GHCN v1 vs v3 Antarctica Region 7

There are very few stations in Antarctica. For that reason it is both very volatile with stations changes and it is very easy to spot where a little change in one spot causes a big shift in “trend”. In this case the v3 data have a much stronger “warming” trend. It largely comes from just a few changes in the 1930-1960 part of the curve. That pulls down that section of the averages ( you can see where the range of the yellow dT line becomes wider, but with a small bias on downward excursions then) and the result is a ‘dip’ at that point. By 1910 the orange line is back at zero (pulled up by the yellow dT having more up excursions and fewer down). The net effect is to create a trend upward from the bulk of the past into the present. If you average all those adjustments would it be a net zero? Would that hide the effect on the overall trend?

v1 vs v3 Region 7 Antarctica

v1 vs v3 Region 7 Antarctica

Notice, too, that the distant past had a group of readings that were inconveniently unchanged from today. Those are omitted in v3.

It is also remarkably striking how the “Ironed Flat” behaviour of recent data really shouts at you from Antarctica. Look at past volatility. +/- 2 C for a total range of 4 C degrees. Look at recent volatility. Barely 1/2 C range. (Though I note that the v3 line is pulled down vs the v1 line even recently, though by a small amount.)

What this chart says to me is that small bias in data shifts (such a a few more down excursions than up) can move a line of trend significanly; and that having adjustments that are just a little shifted in time can make a big shift in trend, even if the “average adjustment” isn’t obviously biasing. (Look at those older high bias data points that put temps back at the zero line in 1910).

Then there is just the effect of “Differential Volatility”. Most of the trend comes from the effect of that very high volatility in the past having a large weight in pulling down that ‘belly of the curve’ while recent low volatility has the line held closer to the zero line. How much of “Global Warming” is really just an artifact of “higher volatility” near the typical baseline period and low volatility now? It was cold in the ’60s and 70s. Nobody doubts that. So if high volatility locations were used then, and low volatility now (as in California) we build in a trend line of “warming” that is really a trend line of “lower volatility” putting the “now” end of the trend line near zero in recent years.

The final point is just to look at how much “trend” changes. The v1 data are dead flat. Run your eye along that thick blue line. It just hugs zero the whole way. Now look at the v3 line. That line has a clearly stronger rising “trend”. If we can get close to 2 C of “warming trend” out of thermometer selection and processing changes between v1 and v3; then how much of “global warming” is in the method and not in the land itself?

Phrased a bit differently:

Which GHCN is a flat out lie? Is it v1 or v3 that’s fraudulent? They can not both be right.

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About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
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7 Responses to GHCN v1 vs v3 Antarctica Region 7

  1. omanuel says:

    Thanks, E.M.Smith, for all your efforts to unravel the deceptive global temperature data that was purchased with public funds. It was only by chance that the Climategate emails and documents were released in Nov 2009.

    The deception in government science began at least sixty-four years earlier in 1945.

    This process started in Aug 1945 when world leaders were surprised by the energy released over Hiroshima and reacted immediately to save themselves and the world from nuclear war.

    a.) Establish the United Nations on 24 Oct 1945 and then
    b.) Promote misinformation in 1946 on the source of energy stored in the cores of heavy atoms (uranium, plutonium), stars (like the Sun), galaxies (like the Milky Way), and perhaps some planets (like Jupiter and Saturn).

    Item b.) seems to have started with two papers that Fred Hoyle published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1946 on the interior of the Sun and other stars being mostly hydrogen (H) rather than iron (Fe) and on the synthesis of other elements from H.

  2. EM – that is a lot of work for us to digest in one sitting. Thanks for putting the effort in.

    A while back I didn’t disbelieve what I was told about global warming – I didn’t have the data to check and accepted the consensus view. Not much I could do about it anyway, and I figured that the problem of burning oil as fuel would sort itself out when it became too expensive for such a use and instead went mainly to make plastics. My main problem with oil use was that we have to import it from people who regard themselves as out enemies. A good reason to find another cheaper and home-grown source.

    If both Antarctica and the equator show no overall signs of warming, then it’s not global. I’ll note a couple of things in passing. I read a while back that soot was found in the Antarctic snow. This will generate a bit of warming through change of albedo. There’s nothing to say that soot was man-made rather than normal forest-fires, though. The other point is that people are working on “global engineering” fixes for the perceived warming problem, such as shooting Sulphur Dioxide into the stratosphere (with an effect similar to the dip in temperatures after Mount St. Helens) or putting mirrors in orbit to reflect the sun’s energy away before it reaches the atmosphere. Such solutions could prove to be a major problem if we can’t adjust them afterwards.

    Since the accuracy of early thermometers depended on how accurately the glass was blown, then early data may easily be a degree or two off the current definitions of temperature, especially since the definitions of temperature scale have changed a few times in the odd century and a half since records began. I think we can rely on NASA’s data being accurate when first measured, but that only goes back a few decades.

  3. Ian W says:

    What this chart says to me is that small bias in data shifts (such a a few more down excursions than up) can move a line of trend significanly; and that having adjustments that are just a little shifted in time can make a big shift in trend, even if the “average adjustment” isn’t obviously biasing. (Look at those older high bias data points that put temps back at the zero line in 1910).

    What this shows to me is a total lack of quality control and/or integrity in the maintenance of data of world importance. There are not that many sites. Each one should be individually documented with any reasons for gaps, changes adjustments formally stated and signed off by the datamanager of the data and the senior forecaster of the meteorological office of the country concerned then signed off by the datamanager of the agency (e.g. CRU/GISS). There should be total and complete traceability for all station records from the original observation through to the final figures with responsibility formally taken for changes by named individuals.

    Is this too much to ask when (from the AGW claims) the future of the planet is at stake? If these people were maintaining the accounts at a village bank they would have been sacked and probably be facing criminal charges.

  4. omanuel says:

    @Simon Derricutt and Ian W

    The AGW crowd were just taking easy research funds in exchange for reporting what their research program officers asked them to find.

    Unfortunately that same behavior has corrupted almost every major field of science since 1945, when world leaders apparently decided to save themselves and the world from nuclear war by:

    a.) Establishing the United Nations on 24 October 1945
    b.) Promoting misinformation on energy in stars in 1946 [1,2]
    c.) Building a fascist Orwellian, one-world government since then

    The rest of the story is here: http://omanuel.wordpress.com/about/#comment-105

    [1] Fred Hoyle, “The chemical composition of the stars,” Monthly Notices Royal Astronomical Society 106, 255-59 (1946)

    [2] Fred Hoyle, “The synthesis of the elements from hydrogen,” Monthly Notices Royal Astronomical Society 106, 343-83 (1946)

  5. DocMartyn says:

    The hypothesis is that CO2 decreases the rate of cooling.
    So the rate of temperature change during the yearly winter/summer cycle should show an increase in the rate of heating on summer and a decrease in the rate of cooling; ignore the Tmax and min. Is there any change in the rates between the 70′s and 2000′s?

  6. E.M.Smith says:

    @Simon:

    One of my favorite things to do when confronted by someone wanting to do the GeoEngineering thing is ask “Do sulphate aerosols cool things?” When they inevitably say yes, I then respond with “Well then it’s easy! Just put the sulphur back in Jet Fuel! They have multiple tanks, so use a low sulphur tank for take off / landing and switch to high sulphur tanks when at altitude.”

    That usually stops them in their tracks for a while ;-)

    @DocMartyn:

    Interesting question. I’d put up graphs under the dT/dt category at the right side for each country on the planet (using the GHCN v2 data set) some with monthly trend lines. IIRC there was no consistent seasonal pattern, but I wasn’t looking for exactly that question / answer… So you could always take a look yourself and see if you spot one. Best to start here:

    http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2010/04/22/dmtdt-an-improved-version/

    and eyeball the graphs in it. If there’s something not already in the dT/dt sets that would help sort it out, let me know and I can likely make a new be of analysis code. To me on a casual look, it doesn’t show much consistent pattern from country to country. (IIRC, Japan had every other month swapping which was warming and which was cooling…)

    @Ian W:

    It would be nice. For formal proof of good record keeping is required of someone who is running a hamburger stand than is used by the “Climate Scientists”…

  7. E.M.Smith says:

    Here are the reports from which the Antarctic graph was made.

    First up, the v1 report:

    Produced from input file: ./DTemps/Temps.rM7                                                                                                              
     
    Thermometer Records, Average of Monthly dP/dt, Yearly running total
    by Year Across Month, with a count of thermometer records in that year
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    YEAR     dP dT/yr  Count JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN JULY  AUG SEPT  OCT  NOV  DEC
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1990   0.00  0.00    6   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1989  -0.15 -0.15   11  -0.3 -0.1 -0.2 -0.7 -1.8  0.1 -1.8  1.1  1.2  0.7  0.0  0.0
    1988   0.29  0.44   16   0.6  0.0  1.0  0.7  2.0  2.3 -0.4  0.1  0.0 -0.2  0.0 -0.8
    1987   0.20 -0.09   22   0.2  0.0 -0.1  0.3 -0.8 -0.2  0.6 -1.2 -1.2 -0.9  1.3  0.9
    1986   0.23  0.03   22  -0.6  1.8  1.1  0.0  0.2 -1.9 -0.2  0.9  0.3  0.1 -0.7 -0.6
    1985   0.44  0.21   25   0.5 -1.6 -0.4  1.0  0.0  2.0  0.0  0.4  1.0 -0.3  0.0 -0.1
    1984   0.56  0.12   26   0.0  0.0 -0.2 -0.7  1.8 -2.4  0.8  0.2  1.0 -0.5  0.3  1.1
    1983   0.54 -0.02   26   0.2  0.0 -0.6  1.1  0.6  1.7 -0.6  0.5 -1.1 -0.2 -0.8 -1.0
    1982   0.02 -0.53   27  -0.1 -1.1 -1.7 -2.2  1.1  1.1  0.4 -3.1 -2.5 -0.1  1.0  0.9
    1981   0.38  0.36   27  -0.2  1.3  1.9  0.4 -2.4 -0.6  2.3  2.8  1.3 -0.7 -0.9 -0.9
    1980  -0.05 -0.42   28   0.0 -0.1  0.0  0.7  0.0 -1.9 -3.1 -2.4 -0.1  0.5  0.8  0.5
    1979   0.05  0.10   31   0.0 -0.1  0.0  1.3 -0.6  0.2 -0.6  0.3  0.7  0.2 -0.2  0.0
    1978   0.16  0.11   32  -0.7  0.9  0.0 -1.1  2.6  0.6  0.5 -1.3  0.2  0.3 -0.2 -0.5
    1977   0.07 -0.09   33   1.2 -0.3 -0.5 -0.8  0.1  0.7  0.9  2.2 -2.9 -1.2 -0.4 -0.1
    1976  -0.29 -0.36   33  -1.1  0.3  0.0 -1.1 -2.2 -1.0 -1.4 -1.6  1.0  0.9  1.1  0.8
    1975  -0.02  0.28   35   0.5 -0.3  0.8  0.4  1.8 -0.2  0.1 -0.9  0.7  1.0 -0.1 -0.5
    1974   0.43  0.45   35   0.0  0.0 -0.6 -0.5 -0.9  1.6  1.6  3.0  0.1 -0.1  0.2  1.0
    1973   0.05 -0.38   34  -0.6 -0.9 -0.4  0.9 -0.1 -1.4 -0.2 -1.3  0.0  0.2  0.3 -1.1
    1972   0.22  0.17   35   0.3  1.0  0.2 -0.4  0.2  0.4  0.0  1.3  1.1 -1.3 -1.3  0.5
    1971   0.44  0.22   35   0.5 -0.4  0.3  0.9 -0.9  0.9  0.5  0.5 -0.7  1.0  0.3 -0.2
    1970   0.30 -0.14   34  -0.2 -0.4  0.0 -1.4 -0.6 -1.2  0.8 -2.1  2.0  0.6  0.4  0.4
    1969  -0.30 -0.60   33  -0.1 -0.4 -1.5  0.5  0.4  0.3 -2.5  0.2 -1.1 -1.7 -1.1 -0.2
    1968  -0.07  0.23   32  -0.6  0.4  1.8  0.0  0.5  0.0  1.4 -0.1 -2.2  1.1  0.9 -0.4
    1967   0.03  0.10   31   1.2  0.1  0.0 -0.4 -0.5 -0.3  1.3  1.0  1.3 -2.0 -0.6  0.1
    1966  -0.11 -0.14   31  -1.1 -0.2  0.4  0.4  0.2  0.2 -0.6 -1.4 -0.5  0.2  0.4  0.3
    1965  -0.02  0.09   28   0.7  1.0 -0.9 -0.5  0.8  0.0 -1.1  1.1  0.1  0.5 -0.1 -0.5
    1964  -0.61 -0.59   28  -0.5 -1.1 -0.6 -2.1 -2.0  1.0  1.2 -2.1 -1.4  0.1  0.4  0.0
    1963  -0.19  0.42   28   0.1 -0.2 -0.5  0.9  1.6 -0.4  0.0  3.5  3.1 -1.9 -1.1 -0.1
    1962  -0.26 -0.07   26  -0.7  0.4  0.3  1.2 -0.3  0.0 -1.1 -1.1 -0.4  1.3  0.0 -0.4
    1961   0.32  0.57   25   0.5  0.8  0.0  0.7  2.3  0.0  0.4 -0.3  0.6  1.5  0.5 -0.1
    1960  -0.42 -0.74   24  -0.5 -0.7 -1.2 -1.4 -1.7 -1.6 -1.3  0.1 -0.9  0.3 -0.2  0.2
    1959  -0.80 -0.38   24  -0.2 -0.8  2.2  0.3 -0.6  0.8 -0.8 -1.5 -2.4 -1.3 -0.8  0.6
    1958  -0.82 -0.03   24   1.2  1.0 -0.2  1.1 -0.1 -2.9 -0.1 -0.6 -0.1  0.4  1.4 -1.4
    1957   0.38  1.20   23  -0.3  0.5  0.6  1.1  1.7  2.6  0.8  2.4  3.8 -0.4  0.2  1.4
    1956   1.43  1.06   14   0.3  0.0 -0.5 -0.6  0.6  4.6  3.1  2.5 -0.4  1.9  0.5  0.7
    1955   0.91 -0.53   11   0.3 -0.4 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -3.4 -0.2 -0.3 -0.3  0.3 -0.3 -0.8
    1954  -0.47 -1.38   10  -1.0 -0.2  0.3  0.0 -0.9 -1.8 -2.8 -5.8 -4.1 -0.5  0.0  0.3
    1953  -0.26  0.21    9  -0.2 -1.0 -0.6 -3.0 -2.2  0.3  1.0  5.8  3.3 -1.1 -0.6  0.8
    1952  -0.01  0.25    9   1.0  1.1  0.3  0.7 -1.3  1.3 -0.3 -0.1  1.0  0.0  0.3 -1.0
    1951   0.42  0.43    9  -0.4  0.3  1.1  3.8  3.9  0.8 -0.4 -0.5 -2.9 -0.6 -1.0  1.0
    1950  -0.47 -0.89    5  -0.9 -0.8 -0.3 -2.1 -3.8 -0.6 -0.7 -2.4 -0.1  0.3  1.0 -0.3
    1949  -1.11 -0.63    5   0.6 -0.9 -2.3 -4.3  1.3 -1.7  0.9 -0.1  1.0  0.1 -1.4 -0.8
    1948  -0.62  0.48    5   0.3  0.4  1.4  3.0  0.0  3.2 -1.2  0.1 -1.0  0.1 -0.8  0.3
    1947   0.42  1.05    5  -0.5  1.0  1.3  1.4  0.4 -3.1  3.4  2.4  2.1  0.9  3.5 -0.2
    1946   0.41 -0.02    5   1.1  0.3  0.0 -0.2  1.9  2.4 -0.2 -1.0 -0.8 -1.6 -2.1  0.0
    1945  -0.92 -1.32    4  -0.9  0.1 -0.6 -2.5 -2.4 -4.1 -2.6 -2.5 -0.9  0.8 -0.8  0.5
    1944   0.25  1.17    4   0.2 -0.8  2.2  3.2  3.1  3.2  2.2  1.7  0.2 -1.7  0.7 -0.2
    1943   1.26  1.01    3   0.1  0.1 -1.1  1.1 -2.7  3.2  3.2  1.8  2.2  1.9  1.3  1.0
    1942  -0.03 -1.28    3   0.2  0.8 -1.4 -3.1  0.4 -3.8 -0.8  0.3 -3.2 -3.4 -1.6  0.2
    1941   0.03  0.06    3   0.4 -0.5 -0.1  0.8  0.8  1.9 -0.9 -3.0  0.4  1.4  0.7 -1.2
    1940   0.57  0.53    3  -1.3  0.0  1.8  1.0  0.9 -0.5 -0.5  1.0  2.3  0.2  1.1  0.4
    1939  -1.01 -1.57    3   0.1 -0.2 -1.5 -0.2 -1.7 -3.7 -2.5 -5.7 -1.8  0.8 -1.7 -0.8
    1938  -0.29  0.72    3  -0.2 -1.4  0.4  0.8  0.1  3.1  1.0  3.9 -0.4  0.7  0.7 -0.1
    1937   0.29  0.58    3   1.1  0.5  0.8 -0.4  2.1  0.7  0.1 -0.7  3.1 -1.4  0.8  0.3
    1936   0.30  0.01    3  -0.7  1.0 -0.5  0.9 -3.7 -2.2  1.2  2.1 -1.2  0.9  0.5  1.8
    1935  -0.92 -1.22    3  -0.6 -0.9  0.9 -2.6  2.5  2.2 -4.4 -2.2 -4.7 -1.1 -1.6 -2.1
    1934  -0.09  0.83    3   1.6 -1.1 -1.6  1.3 -1.8 -3.5  3.8  3.4  4.1  2.0  1.1  0.6
    1933  -0.18 -0.09    3  -1.4  1.3  1.0  0.0  1.9  1.7  1.0 -1.8  0.6 -2.7 -1.4 -1.3
    1932  -0.31 -0.12    3   1.1 -0.1 -0.3 -1.0 -0.8 -3.7 -4.6  1.6  0.6  2.0  2.0  1.7
    1931  -0.12  0.19    3  -1.5 -0.5 -0.2  0.2  0.8  5.4  4.8  0.8 -3.4 -1.2 -2.1 -0.8
    1930  -1.17 -1.05    3   1.5  0.7 -0.4 -0.8 -0.3 -5.3 -6.5 -2.8  2.1 -2.5  1.3  0.4
    1929  -0.42  0.75    3  -1.5  0.0 -0.4  0.7 -0.4  2.9  4.6 -1.4  0.8  3.8  0.7 -0.8
    1928  -1.03 -0.62    3   1.4 -0.2  0.8 -1.2 -3.7 -1.7 -0.9  2.0 -0.8 -1.4 -1.5 -0.2
    1927  -0.68  0.35    3  -0.4 -0.5  0.0  1.9  4.1  3.3  0.9 -3.2 -2.1 -0.3 -0.5  1.0
    1926  -0.22  0.47    3  -0.1  1.8 -0.2 -1.0  0.3 -2.3 -0.1  4.9  1.0 -1.5  1.8  1.0
    1925  -0.06  0.16    3   0.0 -0.7  0.3  1.6  0.4  1.7  0.6 -1.0 -1.1  1.0 -0.7 -0.2
    1924  -0.40 -0.34    3   0.1 -2.1 -0.2 -2.8 -2.5  0.7 -2.4  0.7  2.6  2.5 -0.3 -0.4
    1923  -0.23  0.17    3   0.2  3.0  0.2  1.8  2.6  0.3  1.4 -1.5 -2.4 -1.8  0.0 -1.7
    1922   0.21  0.43    3   0.5 -0.5 -0.4  0.2 -2.8 -1.0  1.7  1.1  1.9  0.2  2.3  2.0
    1921  -0.20 -0.41    3  -0.4 -0.5  0.2  0.2 -0.6  1.2 -1.1 -2.0  0.1  0.6 -1.8 -0.8
    1920  -0.33 -0.12    3   0.0  0.1 -0.5  0.1  2.5 -1.2 -0.4  1.5 -0.8 -3.2  0.2  0.2
    1919   0.28  0.61    3   0.2  0.8  1.0 -1.3 -1.6  0.7  1.5  2.3  1.5  2.5 -0.9  0.6
    1918   0.29  0.01    3   1.2  0.2  0.0  1.5  0.2  0.3 -0.8 -5.5 -0.6  1.9  1.5  0.2
    1917   0.54  0.25    3  -0.8 -0.4  0.1  0.5  3.3 -0.8  0.3  3.4 -2.4 -1.2  1.1 -0.1
    1916  -0.44 -0.98    3  -0.1 -0.4 -1.2 -1.8 -4.3 -0.4 -2.1  0.3  0.8 -1.2 -1.1 -0.3
    1915  -0.71 -0.27    3  -0.3 -0.3  0.7  0.2  0.5 -1.2 -0.7 -4.0  2.0  0.4  0.0 -0.5
    1914   0.27  0.97    3   0.1  0.8  0.4  1.8  3.6  2.0  0.2  4.1 -0.3 -1.0 -0.9  0.9
    1913  -0.41 -0.68    3  -0.7 -0.9 -1.5 -1.4 -0.5 -2.6 -0.3 -0.4  0.5  0.6 -0.6 -0.3
    1912  -0.60 -0.19    3   1.0  0.8  0.3 -1.1 -2.0  1.5 -0.3 -1.9 -0.3 -0.1  0.6 -0.8
    1911   0.05  0.65    3  -0.7 -0.1  0.7  0.0  1.1  1.7  2.3  2.9  0.3  0.7 -0.7 -0.4
    1910   0.45  0.40    3   0.7  0.1  0.3  1.6  0.9  0.6  0.7 -1.7 -0.5 -0.2  2.0  0.3
    1909   0.05 -0.40    3   0.3 -0.4 -0.3 -0.6 -2.0 -1.9 -1.7  2.0 -0.8  0.5 -0.5  0.6
    1908   0.66  0.61    3  -0.7  0.8  0.8  1.0  1.8  1.2 -0.3  0.1  2.4 -0.1  0.6 -0.3
    1907  -0.09 -0.75    3   1.0  0.7 -0.1  0.1  0.5 -1.3  0.3 -5.3 -3.0 -1.1 -0.6 -0.2
    1906   0.12  0.21    3  -0.1 -1.5 -1.0 -0.2 -1.7 -0.6  0.7  4.4  0.7  0.3  0.3  1.2
    1905   0.04 -0.07    3  -1.0 -0.2  0.3 -1.3 -0.7  0.7 -2.8  0.9  2.0  1.2  0.0  0.0
    1904  -0.36 -0.40    2   0.3  0.6  0.2  0.2 -1.8  1.7  1.3 -2.7 -1.5 -2.6  0.4 -0.9
    1903  -0.06  0.30    2   0.0  0.0  0.0 -1.2  1.8 -2.0  2.7  1.6 -1.9  2.4 -0.5  0.7
    1902  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1901  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1900  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1899  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1898  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1897  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1896  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1895  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1894  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1893  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1892  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1891  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1890  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1889  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1888  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1887  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1886  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1885  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1884  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1883  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1882  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1881  -0.06  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1880   0.44  0.50    1   0.0 -0.5  0.3  1.4 -0.3  1.4  2.6 -0.4  1.8  2.4 -1.1 -1.6
    1879   0.44  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1878   0.37 -0.07    1   0.5 -0.1 -1.3  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1877   0.47  0.10    1   0.3 -0.7  3.6 -0.1  0.9  0.6 -0.8  1.3 -1.9 -1.2 -0.8  0.0
    1876   0.06 -0.41    1  -3.0 -0.9 -2.6  1.1 -0.6 -0.5  1.0 -0.2  1.8 -0.6 -0.9  0.5
    1875   0.70  0.64    1   1.0  0.6  1.9 -0.8  0.9  0.8  0.0  0.9  0.5  1.2  1.7 -1.0
    1874   0.85  0.15    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  1.8
     
    For Country Code 7
     
    From input file ./data/v1.mean.invR.dt
    

    Then the v3 report:

    Produced from input file: ./DTemps/Temps.rM07                                                                                                             
     
    Thermometer Records, Average of Monthly dP/dt, Yearly running total
    by Year Across Month, with a count of thermometer records in that year
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    YEAR     dP dT/yr  Count JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN JULY  AUG SEPT  OCT  NOV  DEC
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1990   0.00  0.00   23   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
    1989   0.07  0.07   23  -0.9 -0.2  0.0 -0.8 -0.2  0.3 -0.6  1.3  2.3  0.3 -0.6 -0.2
    1988   0.26  0.18   22   0.9 -0.2  1.1  1.3  1.2  1.0 -1.0 -1.1 -0.4 -0.1 -0.3 -0.3
    1987  -0.36 -0.62   27  -0.1  0.3 -0.6 -0.1 -1.3 -0.7 -1.0 -1.6 -2.6 -0.9  0.9  0.4
    1986  -0.33  0.03   27  -0.7  1.6  0.4  0.6 -0.3 -1.3 -0.1  1.7  0.3 -0.3 -1.0 -0.6
    1985   0.05  0.38   28   0.7 -1.9 -0.4  0.1  0.2  2.2  0.6  0.9  2.0  0.4 -0.1 -0.1
    1984   0.16  0.12   28   0.7 -0.2  0.3 -0.5  2.5 -3.4 -0.0  0.1  1.0 -1.1  0.3  1.6
    1983   0.10 -0.07   29  -0.6  0.3 -1.2  0.9  0.3  2.5 -0.9  0.6 -0.5  0.4 -0.9 -1.6
    1982  -0.55 -0.65   29  -0.3 -0.3 -1.0 -1.8 -0.9 -0.8  0.4 -3.3 -2.7 -0.0  1.7  1.2
    1981  -0.12  0.43   29  -0.3  0.3  1.9  0.7 -1.1  0.8  2.5  3.4  0.7 -1.2 -1.5 -1.1
    1980  -0.40 -0.28   27   0.5 -0.2 -0.1  0.2 -0.2 -2.1 -2.6 -2.5  0.8  0.8  1.5  0.6
    1979  -0.54 -0.14   27  -0.2 -0.2 -0.3  1.8 -0.8  0.2 -2.0 -0.2  0.2  0.3 -0.3  0.1
    1978  -0.30  0.23   27  -0.7  0.9  0.1 -1.1  2.9  1.5  1.5 -1.7  0.4  0.5 -0.5 -0.9
    1977  -0.36 -0.05   28   2.0 -0.5 -0.4 -0.7 -0.1  0.6  1.0  3.3 -3.9 -1.5 -0.5  0.2
    1976  -0.85 -0.50   27  -1.2  0.2 -0.1 -1.2 -2.6 -1.7 -1.9 -2.9  1.8  1.0  1.4  1.3
    1975  -0.43  0.42   28   0.3 -0.1  1.1  0.3  2.6  0.0  0.5 -0.6  0.7  1.3 -0.2 -0.9
    1974   0.07  0.50   28  -0.0 -0.2 -0.9 -0.3 -1.2  1.9  1.0  3.5  0.3  0.1  0.6  1.2
    1973  -0.38 -0.45   26  -0.8 -0.9 -0.7  1.2 -0.1 -1.4  0.0 -1.7  0.2 -0.0  0.4 -1.7
    1972  -0.16  0.22   26   0.4  1.1  0.5 -0.5 -0.4  0.4 -0.3  2.3  1.4 -1.5 -1.4  0.5
    1971   0.05  0.21   25   0.8 -0.2  0.2  1.0 -0.2  0.5  0.3 -0.5 -0.8  1.5 -0.1  0.1
    1970  -0.14 -0.19   24  -0.9 -1.0  0.6 -1.2 -0.8 -0.9  0.7 -2.3  1.7  0.7  0.6  0.5
    1969  -0.76 -0.62   23   0.1  0.0 -1.8  0.6  0.4  0.8 -3.0 -0.1 -1.3 -1.6 -1.2 -0.4
    1968  -0.58  0.18   23  -0.7  0.3  1.9  0.0  0.5 -0.5  1.5  0.5 -2.6  1.2  0.8 -0.7
    1967  -0.24  0.34   22   1.5  0.2 -0.7 -0.9 -0.1  0.3  2.2  1.4  2.0 -2.0 -0.4  0.6
    1966  -0.37 -0.13   22  -1.6 -0.1  1.2  0.9  0.2 -0.1 -1.1 -1.9 -0.3  0.3  0.5  0.3
    1965  -0.50 -0.12   19   0.9  0.9 -2.0 -0.5  1.0  0.1 -1.0  1.5 -0.7 -0.3 -0.8 -0.7
    1964  -0.83 -0.34   21  -0.1 -1.2 -0.1 -2.1 -2.8  1.1  1.7 -1.7 -1.2  0.8  1.2  0.2
    1963  -0.57  0.26   22   0.1 -0.1 -0.8  0.5  1.5  0.2 -0.5  3.1  3.3 -1.8 -1.8 -0.6
    1962  -0.72 -0.14   21  -1.2  0.7  0.3  1.4 -0.4  0.2 -1.3 -1.7 -0.6  1.2  0.0 -0.5
    1961   0.01  0.72   20   0.9  0.5  0.2  0.9  3.0 -1.0  0.6  0.3  0.9  1.6  1.0 -0.2
    1960  -0.98 -0.98   19  -0.7 -1.1 -1.5 -1.6 -2.7 -1.8 -1.2  0.3 -1.4  0.0 -0.6  0.4
    1959  -1.27 -0.29   22  -0.2 -0.4  2.2  0.2  0.0  1.0 -1.4 -1.5 -2.5 -1.1 -0.4  0.6
    1958  -1.42 -0.16   22   1.3  1.1 -0.2  0.9 -0.7 -3.1  0.0 -1.4  0.0  0.4  1.3 -1.5
    1957   0.30  1.73   22  -0.2  0.4  0.7  2.2  2.0  3.8  1.3  3.6  4.7  0.2  0.5  1.6
    1956   1.51  1.21   14   0.4 -0.1 -0.4 -0.6  0.3  4.8  3.8  2.9 -0.3  2.2  0.6  0.9
    1955   0.82 -0.69   10   0.2 -0.6 -0.7 -0.7 -0.6 -3.9 -0.2 -0.5 -0.3  0.4 -0.4 -0.8
    1954  -1.15 -1.97    8  -1.1 -0.3  0.5 -0.8 -1.5 -2.8 -4.5 -8.1 -5.5 -0.4  0.2  0.6
    1953  -1.21 -0.07    7  -0.6 -1.6 -1.5 -4.2 -3.4 -0.4  1.2  7.8  4.4 -2.0 -0.8  0.5
    1952  -0.63  0.59    9   1.1  1.6  0.6  1.7 -1.0  2.5 -0.0  0.3  1.1  0.0  0.2 -1.0
    1951  -0.29  0.34    9  -0.5  0.2  1.5  3.0  4.5  0.3 -0.6 -0.6 -4.3  0.0 -0.1  0.9
    1950  -1.07 -0.78    5  -0.1 -1.1 -0.8 -1.9 -4.0 -0.2  0.8 -3.8  1.7  0.0  0.1 -0.1
    1949  -2.69 -1.62    4  -0.0 -0.6 -3.6 -6.2  0.0 -4.5 -0.6  0.0 -0.1 -0.9 -2.2 -0.8
    1948  -1.54  1.15    4   0.6  0.6  2.4  4.6  1.6  6.1 -1.0  1.1 -1.2  0.5 -1.6  0.1
    1947  -0.09  1.45    4  -0.0  1.9  2.2  2.0  0.8 -4.4  5.8  2.9  2.5  0.2  4.1 -0.6
    1946   0.09  0.17    3   0.1 -0.5 -0.2 -0.1  2.8  6.2 -0.4 -1.8  1.0 -3.0 -2.4  0.6
    1945  -1.74 -1.82    3  -0.6  0.7 -1.8 -3.6  0.5 -6.1 -5.8 -3.5 -2.5  1.0 -0.9  0.6
    1944  -0.59  1.15    3   0.6 -1.0  2.4  5.2 -0.9  1.9  3.7  1.8 -0.4 -1.0  1.6 -0.0
    1943   0.79  1.38    1  -0.6 -0.4 -2.2 -0.7 -6.4  5.4  4.4  5.1  5.6  3.0  2.4  0.9
    1942  -1.77 -2.56    1   0.0  0.5 -1.0 -5.8  1.4 -7.6 -1.0 -1.1 -7.1 -5.4 -2.9 -0.7
    1941  -0.87  0.90    1   0.9  0.4  0.4  4.3  4.7  3.7 -1.2 -6.0  0.7  2.1  1.0 -0.2
    1940  -0.41  0.47    1  -0.8 -0.1  1.8  0.4 -2.3 -0.5 -3.4  2.7  4.8  0.2  1.8  1.0
    1939  -2.39 -1.98    1   0.2 -0.1 -0.9  0.1  0.5 -8.2 -3.5-10.1 -2.8  3.2 -1.2 -1.0
    1938  -1.55  0.84    1  -0.2 -1.3 -0.2  0.9 -3.3  6.8  2.3  7.5 -1.0 -0.4 -0.7 -0.3
    1937   0.44  1.99    1   1.1  1.1  1.6  0.0  6.9  3.3  2.0  0.2  5.6 -0.6  1.9  0.8
    1936  -0.22 -0.67    1  -1.3  0.5 -0.5  0.8 -5.8 -6.7  1.2  3.4 -1.9  0.3  0.3  1.7
    1935  -2.00 -1.77    1   0.3 -0.7  0.6 -2.5  4.3  6.4 -9.4 -6.5 -7.9 -1.4 -2.6 -1.9
    1934  -1.19  0.81    1  -0.1 -1.5 -2.4  0.5 -5.8 -7.2  8.3  6.5  7.0  1.2  2.3  0.9
    1933  -1.78 -0.59    1  -0.3  0.6  1.1 -1.0  3.1  1.9  1.0 -4.0  0.0 -4.3 -2.9 -2.3
    1932  -1.71  0.07    1   0.4  0.2 -0.6  1.2  0.4 -7.8 -8.6  5.1  2.3  4.5  2.9  0.8
    1931  -1.14  0.58    1  -1.6 -0.3 -0.9 -1.9  1.9 10.6  9.9  0.8 -7.2 -2.1 -2.2 -0.1
    1930  -3.60 -2.46    1   1.5  0.4  0.7 -2.6 -2.1 -9.1-14.8 -4.3  4.3 -4.9  1.0  0.4
    1929  -2.13  1.47    1  -1.2 -0.9 -1.3  1.4 -0.6  3.4  9.1 -3.9  2.4  7.3  1.6  0.3
    1928  -3.31 -1.18    1   1.5  0.9  2.4 -1.9 -8.3 -1.2  0.5  1.8 -4.1 -2.9 -2.2 -0.7
    1927  -2.12  1.19    1  -0.3 -0.6 -0.5  4.2  8.6  6.4  0.4 -4.8 -0.4  0.7 -0.7  1.3
    1926  -1.01  1.12    1   0.9  2.5 -0.4  0.0  2.6 -5.2  0.8 11.4  1.7 -3.2  2.3  0.0
    1925  -1.12 -0.12    1  -0.8 -1.0 -0.1  2.1  0.2  4.1  0.9 -2.7 -3.8  1.0 -1.3  0.0
    1924  -1.75 -0.62    1  -0.8 -3.3 -1.6 -4.6 -5.6  2.6 -5.0  1.7  4.9  4.5 -0.2 -0.1
    1923  -0.86  0.89    1   1.0  3.7  2.7  3.2  5.3  0.2  5.1 -2.5 -6.1 -1.0  1.1 -2.0
    1922  -0.83  0.02    1  -0.1 -0.4 -1.5 -1.1 -5.9 -2.2  2.6  0.1  5.6 -0.3  1.3  2.2
    1921  -1.25 -0.42    1  -1.1 -1.0  0.9  2.2 -1.0  3.9 -3.0 -3.6 -0.2  1.5 -2.8 -0.8
    1920  -1.36 -0.12    1   1.0  0.2 -0.5 -0.2  5.0 -2.8 -0.2  4.4 -2.4 -6.5  1.2 -0.6
    1919  -0.16  1.20    1   0.6  0.8  1.4 -2.1 -2.8  0.4  3.1  5.1  4.2  4.9 -2.9  1.7
    1918  -0.42 -0.26    1   1.0  0.3 -0.2  2.0 -0.5  1.9 -0.7-12.4 -0.4  3.0  3.5 -0.6
    1917   0.02  0.44    1  -1.5 -0.5  0.0  1.3  7.3 -3.6  0.7  7.5 -6.3 -1.3  1.0  0.7
    1916  -2.13 -2.15    1  -0.3 -0.6 -1.5 -4.8-10.8 -0.4 -4.3  1.1  0.1 -2.5 -0.9 -0.9
    1915  -2.96 -0.83    1  -0.7 -0.4  0.7  0.7  1.5 -2.8 -3.1-10.4  5.0  0.9 -0.6 -0.8
    1914  -0.62  2.34    1   0.4  1.0  1.0  4.1  7.8  4.4  0.9 10.6  0.2 -2.4 -1.2  1.3
    1913  -1.66 -1.03    1  -0.8 -1.1 -2.3 -1.9 -0.7 -5.4  0.2 -0.4  1.0  0.5 -1.8  0.3
    1912  -2.44 -0.78    1   1.7  1.4  0.3 -2.9 -5.7  2.9 -1.1 -5.4 -0.6  0.7  0.8 -1.5
    1911  -0.46  1.98    1  -1.4 -0.3  0.9 -0.1  3.8  5.9  5.4  7.5  1.6  1.1 -0.3 -0.3
    1910   0.01  0.47    1   0.6  0.2  1.1  3.5  3.0  0.4  0.9 -5.8 -1.8  0.3  3.1  0.1
    1909  -1.11 -1.12    1   1.1 -0.2 -0.7 -1.6 -6.5 -5.0 -4.2  4.9 -1.7  0.8 -0.9  0.6
    1908   0.39  1.50    1  -1.1  0.6  0.5  2.0  5.3  4.8 -0.3  0.4  4.6  0.0  0.9  0.3
    1907  -1.58 -1.97    1   0.5  0.2 -0.1  0.6 -0.4 -6.0  0.5-10.5 -4.9 -2.3 -0.5 -0.8
    1906  -1.25  0.33    1   0.7 -1.0 -1.5 -0.7 -2.5 -0.6  0.2  8.2 -0.5  0.4  0.3  1.0
    1905  -1.20  0.05    1  -1.5 -1.2  1.2 -2.7 -1.2  0.1 -4.7  3.2  5.0  1.9  0.1  0.4
    1904  -2.01 -0.82    1   0.6  1.2  0.4  0.4 -3.7  3.4  2.6 -5.5 -3.1 -5.2  0.9 -1.8
    1903  -1.40  0.62    1   0.0  0.0  0.0 -2.4  3.6 -4.0  5.5  3.3 -3.9  4.8 -1.0  1.5
     
    For Country Code 7
     
    From input file ./data/v3.mean.invR0.dt 
    

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