GHCN – Oh!, Canada – Rockies, We Don’t Need No Rockies

Canadian Rockies - Ringrose Peak

Canadian Rockies - Ringrose Peak

Canada Vancouver - On the Beach With Palms

Canada Vancouver - On the Beach With Palms

Upslope in the Canadian Rockies, or downslope on the shore in Vancouver. I think this matters…

Original images. First, Ringrose Peak

Canadian Rockies – Ringrose Peak


The Vancouver Palm scene:

For reasons that are completely opaque, WordPress sometimes gets it’s nose out of joint on some hypertext and just becomes a pill about it, stripping out the “offending html” even if there is nothing wrong with it. I’ve tried for about an hour to get this URL to “stick” inside an HTML tag, and it won’t. No idea why right now. I’ll come back to it some other day. But if you want to see the original Vancouver beach scene you will need to do a ‘copy paste’ and put this address in your browser. (And yes, I know the HTML to build the link and yes I’ve tried it – along with a dozen capricious variations that sometimes get WordPress to change it’s mind – all to no avail.)

Rockies? ROCKIES? We Don’t Need No Stinking Rockies!

Oh, Canada! Being turned into one flat hockey field!

The absolute lowest point in the Canadian Rockies is a river valley, and it is above 300 m in elevation. So as you watch all that “stuff” above 300 m slowly erode, you can just imagine it being deposited on a beach near the ocean…

Look at ./Alts/Therm.by.Alt403.Dec.ALT (Y/N)? y
 
    Year -MSL    20   50  100  200  300  400  500 1000 2000  Space
DAltPct: 1779   0.0  0.0  0.0 75.0 25.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1829   0.0  0.0  0.0 68.0 32.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1839   0.0  0.0  0.0 84.6 15.4  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1849   0.0  0.0  0.0 80.5 19.5  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1859   0.0  0.0 23.5 60.8  7.8  0.0  7.8  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1869   0.0  0.0 22.2 53.3 13.3 11.1  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1879  10.1  9.5 21.1 31.9 21.4  4.4  0.0  1.5  0.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1889  12.8  7.5  9.9 24.9 21.3  7.8  2.8 10.5  2.5  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1899  14.5  7.1  9.1 17.7 15.0  9.8  7.1 15.2  4.6  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1909  14.6  5.9  9.2 16.8 13.7  9.4  7.2 18.9  4.3  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1919  10.6  5.3  8.3 14.2 14.5 10.8  8.7 23.1  4.5  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1929  10.4  5.3  7.6 13.7 12.9 12.1  8.8 25.2  4.0  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1939  11.1  6.8  7.4 12.6 12.2 13.0  7.6 25.6  3.7  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1949  12.0 10.0  8.7 12.5 10.9 12.6  6.5 23.5  3.2  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1959  12.4 10.8 11.2 12.9 10.3 12.3  5.3 22.1  2.7  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1969  13.4 11.4 11.6 11.9 10.3 12.2  4.4 22.0  2.8  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1979  13.2 11.7 11.1 11.1 10.6 10.9  4.4 23.6  3.3  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1989  13.0 12.0 10.6 10.7 11.7  9.6  4.0 24.6  3.7  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 1999  17.5 19.8 14.8  9.1 10.6  6.7  2.0 18.0  1.6  0.0  0.0
DAltPct: 2009  22.0 23.2 10.0  8.1  8.9  9.3  2.9 14.4  1.2  0.0  0.0
 
For COUNTRY CODE: 403

Almost half of Canada is below 50 m elevation and 55% is below 100 m elevation.

Notice that this chart has asymmetrical altitude bands. The gradations are smaller at the low altitudes than they are at the top. In the middle, I go by 100 m, then a 500 m jump, then 1000 m, then everything above 2000 m.

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About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
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8 Responses to GHCN – Oh!, Canada – Rockies, We Don’t Need No Rockies

  1. Harold Vance says:

    Excerpt from the Summits of Canada web site:

    “Temperatures are extremely cold on and near Mount Logan. On May 26, 1991 a record -77.5 °C (-106.6 °F) was observed, making it the coldest recorded temperature outside of Antarctica. (It is not counted as the coldest temperature in North America since it was recorded at a very high altitude.)”

    http://www.summitsofcanada.ca/canatrek/summits/yukon.html

    It’s also interesting that Banff is listed as the highest town in Canada with an altitude of 1,463 m. This is lower than Denver.

  2. E.M.Smith says:

    How can they decide to just leave it out due to altitude? All of the high plateau of Antarctica is high elevation and we don’t leave it out…

  3. Dennis says:

    Meanwhile, in the U.S. Rockies, the continental US hit its coldest recorded temperature of -70 °F on January 20, 1954 at Rogers Pass, Montana. The pass sits at 5,470 feet elevation in the Rocky Mountains.

    The two reference thermometers in Montana are at Missoula and Billings. Missoula is at about 3200 feet and is far from representative. I live 8 miles from there and my temps are typically 4-5 degree lower and ppt. is 2″ to 3″ higher on an annual basis.

    Missoula is about 75 miles from Rogers Pass. I suspect including Great Falls or Havre and Kalispell or Libby would go a long ways in balancing the temperature profile for Montana

    REPLY: [ I started in doing a ‘by alititude’ profile for the western states, but there is not a convenient division of the ‘country code’ to capture what I was looking to capture. I’m still working on it… but there is clearly some evidence that the same effect is working in the USA, with thermometers running ‘down slope’ away from the snow and toward the beach… or the meadow, for Montana ;-) -ems ]

  4. juanslayton says:

    OT, but I want to reach you. I just posted the following on the Tips thread at WUWT.

    Att: EM Smith & other interested persons

    Looks to me like NOAA has just taken down its 2 lists of GHCN stations that were formerly posted at http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/station_….
    Sorry, the ends of those links don’t show on my bookmarks pull-down. Wouldn’t matter anyway, the listing has been removed.

    One list purported to show stations actually in use; the other a larger list of stations that were eligible for use. Do you have them archived?

  5. juanslayton says:

    Guess here is that you do have them archived. Just in case you don’t, I just found the “List of All Stations” that I downloaded a few days ago.
    jws

  6. E.M.Smith says:

    @juanslayton

    All of GISS seems to be “down” right now.

    Since I have archived copies of the GHCN and USHCN data, I can recreate the used vs not used from that.

    I’ve put up a “GISS Watch” posting as we wait to see what tomorrow brings…

  7. vjones says:

    I have a list of ‘stations actually used’ in Excel if anyone needs. It is useful as it can be readily sorted by lat/long, by country code etc. as well as providing a search capacity for any name or Station ID.

    email is under full profile on site.

  8. E.M.Smith says:

    Testing comment link handling:

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