Mysterious Marble Bar

Marble Bar Australia

For some reason, Marble Bar Australia captures attention. This isn’t the first time it’s come around. We’ve had folks bring it up on some of the other Australia and Pacific threads. But it’s the first time I really looked closely at what is around Marble Bar.

How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Splices

In looking at Marble Bar, the first thing I stumbled over was the question of “Which Marble Bar”? There are two places with slightly different locations and very different names that are very near to each other:

[chiefio@Hummer 2010]$ inin ^5019431500

50194315000 MARBLE BAR -21.17 119.75 189 239R -9HIDEno-9x-9SAND DESERT A 0
50194315001 NULLAGINE (NULLAGINE POST OFFI -21.88 120.12 380 434R -9HIDEno-9x-9SAND DESERT A 0

Decoding this we have “501” as the Australia Country Code. Then “94315” as the main station number. The next 3 digits are used to tell you which “sub-station” is in use at a location. The idea being that if you have a thermometer near the runway at the airport and one on the tower, you can tell them apart. OK, it turns out that “Marble Bar” and “Nullagine Post Office” have the same major station number. Marble Bar having the “000” 3 digit substation ought to be the oldest and “001” ought to have come along later. The numbers after the name are the LAT LONG ALTITUDE as reported and Altitude from a Grid Map. So we can see these are within fractional degrees of the same place, though the Post Office is a bit up slope from Marble Bar. They both have an R for Rural and then a “-9” for no population count. Neither one is an airport (that “x” where airports would have “A”). And both are “Sand Desert”.

But what else is near there that might be blended with them into the Grid / Cell by programs like GIStemp?

Casting a slightly larger net we get several stations in the area:

[chiefio@Hummer 2010]$ inin ^5019431
50194312000 PORT HEDLAND -20.10 119.57 10 8S 13FLxxCO 5A 5WATER A 0
50194312001 GOLDSWORTHY (GOLDSWORTHY) -20.35 119.52 45 38R -9FLDECO30x-9SAND DESERT A 0
50194313000 WITTENOOM -22.23 118.33 464 537R -9HIDEno-9x-9WARM GRASS/SHRUBA 0
50194315000 MARBLE BAR -21.17 119.75 189 239R -9HIDEno-9x-9SAND DESERT A 0
50194315001 NULLAGINE (NULLAGINE POST OFFI -21.88 120.12 380 434R -9HIDEno-9x-9SAND DESERT A 0
50194318000 NYANG -23.03 115.03 112 110R -9HIDEno-9x-9WARM GRASS/SHRUBA 0
50194318001 NYANG (WINNING) -23.17 114.53 75 67R -9HIDEno-9x-9WARM GRASS/SHRUBA 0
50194319000 TELFER -21.70 122.22 294 321R -9HIDEno-9x-9SAND DESERT C 18

Hmm… There are two NYANGs here, with a change of minor number. So another station move / splice.

Everything is “Sand Desert” or “Warm” something or other. Except “Port Hedland” that is “water” and has an “A” airport flag. It is Suburban (that “S” in the 8S so it’s at 8 meters of elevation and is a Suburban Airport. The 13 claims about 13,000 population. This is sounding less and less like an unchanging Rural Desert and more and more like a growing suburban water playground, perhaps with some shipping industry.

From the Wiki:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Hedland,_Western_Australia

Port Hedland is the highest tonnage port in Australia [2] and largest town[3] in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, with a population of approximately 14,000 (this includes its satellite suburb South Hedland, 18 km away).

Port Hedland is a natural deep anchorage port which, as well as being the main fuel and container receival point for the region, was seen as perfect for shipment of the iron ore being mined in the ranges located inland from the town. The ore is moved by railway lines from four major iron ore deposits to the east and south of Port Hedland area. Other major resource activities supported include the offshore natural gas fields, salt, manganese, and livestock. Grazing of cattle and sheep was formerly a major revenue earner for the region but this has slowly declined. Port Hedland was formerly the terminus for the WAGR Marble Bar Railway which serviced the gold mining area of Marble Bar.

So we’ve moved from a declining mining area in the hills to a growing sea port with significant new rail lines and ore handling facilities along with cargo container handling (and the attendant trucks, tarmac and all…).

So, what’s to “tour” in Port Hedland? Well, these folks offer a 24 hour tour that I’d love (but I’m “into” machinery). It includes a nice stop at the BHP Billiton works:

http://www.creativespirits.info/ozwest/porthedland/24hours.html

4.00 pm
Go to the Tourist Bureau in Wedge Street. The staff is very helpful with all your questions. Book your BHP Billiton iron ore tour for tomorrow morning (Monday to Friday only). Get a town map. The office is open till 5 pm.

4.30 pm
Stroll through the town and admire the red dust that covers everything. Use the low sunlight for photography. You might like to buy some minerals at the Rock Shed (good value).

Port Hedland. Near Richardson Street. View to Finucane Island with port facilities.
5.50 pm
Depending on the time of year you are here, the sun sets. Off Richardson Street you can walk to a small three-storey jetty that is an ideal platform to see the sun setting behind the harbour opposite on Finucane Island.

Check out whether you can hire a bike from your accommodation for tomorrow (if you don’t own a car).

8.30 am
Tourist Bureau opens. For a small fee you can climb the Observation Tower, overlooking the red dusty town and the BHP Billiton iron ore site. Good for great morning shots of the town, but mind your hat! You must wear closed shoes to be allowed to climb, and I would advise you not to wear anything white or valuable, as the tower is somewhat rusty.

9.30 am
The BHP Iron Ore Tour starts. You’ll be picked up from the Tourist Bureau in a van which drives through the working plant. Unfortunately you cannot get out to take photos (security). However, the driver is happy to stop anywhere you like and parks the van in the right position. The tour concludes around 11.30 am. The new HBI (hot briquetted iron) plant is not included in the tour.

OK… “Hot Briquetted Iron” does not sound very pristine nor cool… Though I’d love to take a tour of a working ironworks… That “Smith” part of the name is from a family of working Smiths… At about 5 years old my Dad taught me to temper a knife blade by color temperature. Hey, folks who LIKE Iron really LOVE Big Iron! So I’m putting Port Hedland on my “wish list” for next time I’m “Down Under”… but YMMV. The link includes this picture:

BHP Iron Ore Plant with Salt Truck in foreground

BHP Iron Ore Plant with Salt Truck in foreground

It is believed that use of this picture for non-profit educational purposes fits the “Fair Use” doctrine.

Interesting contrast is to Marble Bar. These folks:

http://www.discoverwest.com.au/western_australia/marble_bar.html

have this quote:

Situated some 200 km south east inland of Port Hedland, Marble Bar gained the dubious reputation of the hottest town in Australia when the temperature stayed above 100 degrees Fahrenheit 37.8 degrees Celsius for 161 consecutive days in 1923-24.

Hmmm…. Decisions decisions. Which one to keep in the data set. The one with declining Gold Mining industry and a record set in 1924 that has not been exceeded. The “hottest place” but not getting any hotter… Or… The cooler place by the shore with a rapid major industrializing trend including Iron Ore shipping, smelting and “Hot Briquetting” AND and Airport to boot?

I’m sure it was a very hard decision to make…

Marble Bar Today

Marble Bar has retained its mining background, with manganese mining, gold mining and pastoral production being the mainstay of the population of some 1000 souls.

Marble Bar Attractions

Some colonial buildings of when the brave and the adventurous from around the world were lured by the gold rush to the far north west outback are still evident in Marble Bar. Government buildings erected in 1895 are retained and National Trust listed; the Comet Gold Mine is a museum with displays of rocks, minerals and local gemstones. It also has the highest smoke stack in the southern hemisphere and underground mine tours take place daily.

Marble Bar Nearby Attractions

The Jasper deposit is at Marble Bar Pool, 4 km from town; where splashing water on the marble brings out the colour of the Jasper quartz rock. Chinamans pool is an ideal picnic spot, with an infamous history: A Chinese miner was hanged here, in the olden days when he refused to disclose the secret location of his gold strike to claim jumpers. Fifty kms north of Marble Bar, on the Port Hedland Road, is One Mile Gorge, a photographers and bush walkers delight. Approximately 68km out of Marble Bar, on the old Shay Gap Road, is a deep cutting in the hills known as Coppins Gap, and 6km further on is Kittys Gap.Doolena Gorge, some 45 km NW of Marble Bar is the place to watch the romantic and dramatic glow as the cliff-face turns bright red in the setting sun.

Though it may be just a bit hard to get to these days, and I’d double check that there are accommodations if headed that way. This site:

http://www.planetware.com/australia/marble-bar-aus-wa-mb.htm

makes it sound a bit “small” and getting smaller…

The old gold-digging town of Marble Bar (pop. 330) lies in the arid interior. Its name comes from the unique bar of red jasper which crosses the (usually dry) Coongan River 6km from the little township and gleams when it is wet.

The new line of the Great Northern Highway no longer passes through Marble Bar but between Newman and Port Hedland through the Pilbara region farther to the west. The old road, 480km long, is now a mere track, leaving Marble Bar isolated.

Marble Bar holds the record as the hottest place in Australia. In 1923-4 the temperature was above 37.8°C on 160 successive days.

Marble Bar, now a typical outback settlement, preserves as a reminder of the gold boom its massive government buildings (1895), built of local stone, which are now occupied by the police station and mining offices.

Since the temperature was taken ‘at the Post Office’ for a lot of the time, this “downtown” scenic is probably indicative of the area:

Marble Bar Australia Downtown

Marble Bar Australia Downtown

(as a non-profit educational use I believe that use of this image falls under the “fair use” doctrine).

Original and more images can be found at:

http://www.pleasetakemeto.com/australia/marble-bar/photos/marble-bar_001227

h/t DJA in comments.

And the rest of the photo collection even includes the dry hot surrounds that I’ve “cherry picked out” via picking a “downtown” shot.

The Marble Bar Area, Graphs and Splicing

First up, Marble bar and the nearby Nullagine Post Office.

Marble Bar

Modestly Flat with a bit of a drop at the start and a tiny rise at the end, but probably artifacts of the cut off times. “Accidental” non-average moments at the start and end.

Marble Bar Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Marble Bar Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Nullagine

A little drop and a touch of volatility, but again, mostly flat.

Nullagine Post Office Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Nullagine Post Office Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Combined, Nullagine and Marble Bar

Golly, talk about “emergent behaviours”. We now have nicely drooping entry and nicely rising exit. Still substantially flat in the middle, though now with a clear “rise over time” to the trend line.

Marble Bar and Nullagine Combined Anomalies and Running Total

Marble Bar and Nullagine Combined Anomalies and Running Total

Port Hedland

This is one of the stations that makes it into the present. It’s over by the coast though. Described above as growing and industrial. Volatile with a bit of rise, but nothing spectacular. Mostly a bit of “droop” at the start and an odd drop / overshoot rebound at the end. The middle is more flat than not.

Port Hedland Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Port Hedland Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Goldsworthy

A mining town a bit more inland. A short record that looks a bit like a “boom town” rapid growth of a mine. A very short 25 year record with what looks like about 0.6 C of rise, mostly as a ‘step function’ right in the middle.

Goldsworthy Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Goldsworthy Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Combining Goldsworth and Port Hedland

Golly, more emergent behaviour… who knew? Now we have a much more smoothly rising trend line with an odd “dip” in the end, but then a recovery back to “trend”…

Port Hedland and Goldsworthy Combined Anomalies and Running Total

Port Hedland and Goldsworthy Combined Anomalies and Running Total

OK, that’s 4 of the 7 stations “in the area” and now I’m “hooked”. How about the remaining stations?

Two Misc. Stations

Wittenooom

Wittenoom Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Wittenoom Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Telfer

Telfer Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Telfer Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

The Nyang and Nyang Winning set, when Spliced

These two fragments are disjoint in time by a few years, but in theory if you can splice anything with impunity it ought to be two records from “substantially the same place”…

Nyang

First up, the “more or less flat” recent tail end.

Nyang Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Nyang Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Nyang Winning

Then the early segment from prior to the 25 year gap. This bit with a rising trend.

Nyang Winning Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

Nyang Winning Monthly Anomalies and Running Total

What happens when spliced?

We get a nice rising trend out of it. The end is still flat, but the fact that the “lift” all comes from one hot segment in time at a single slightly different place is “lost in translation”.

Nyangs as Combined Anomalies and Running Total

Nyangs as Combined Anomalies and Running Total

The 7 Stations numbered Near Marble Bar when Combined

OK, now we’re going to take all the above stations and see what happens when we combine all of them together. (This is “reasonable” as the other climate codes frequently “homogenize” together and combine records from up to 1000 km away. Further, GIStemp will then use those combined records to fill in a “Grid Box” up to 1200 km away.

Now we get a stellar fast and hot rise of temperatures. All from splicing a bunch of shorter records for places that were not individually having that much rise over that much lifetime…

Magnificent 7 Near Marble Bar Combined Anomalies

Magnificent 7 Near Marble Bar Combined Anomalies

(This is a total of 8 stations: the 7 “near” it, plus Marble Bar, or think of it as treating the two “NYANG”s as the same place. The “splicing” max count shows some stations don’t all overlap.)

Have I mentioned lately that it’s A Very Bad Idea to splice data series? I think Marble Bar is a stellar example of why. If you live in “Boom Town” country and move the thermometer with you every time a new boom town forms, you catch a series of “Boom Town Heat Island Explosions”. Then Splicing them all together is a horrifically wrong thing to do. And what is “averaging anomalies” other than a computerized automated splice? And what do all the data series ( such as GIStemp and CRUtem et all) do? Yup, average anomalies. Though they do it on steroids as they do a boat load of “fill in” prior to that process, so you get a “double dip” of the splice artifacts.

Conclusions

I can just hear The Warmers saying things like “Well, of course you found a warming trend, you just spliced without all the appropriate adjustments done by GIStemp and other professional codes.

One Small Problem.

They find the same “warming trend”.

NASA Dec2009 Anomaly Map defaults

NASA GISS Anomaly map Dec 2009 Default 1200 km 'fill in'

Marble Bar is over in that deep red blob on the North West corner of Australia… And it isn’t just an artifact of this particular monthly graph. It’s in the yearly too:

The GISS view of 2009 via their Anomaly Map for 2009

The GISS view of 2009 via their Anomaly Map for 2009

So, IMHO, their method of splicing my be slightly better, but it’s still a splice. “Houston, YOU have a problem!”.

Some Data

I’m going to post some data blocks here. These are the same data as in the graphs. I will most likely delete these data blocks in a day or two unless someone asks for them to be retained.

So, what does the data look like? First up Marble Bar (where, oddly, the 1992 anomaly from the data is higher than the 1924 anomaly when the record was set. Gee, wonder if there was about to be an embarrassing need to explain how the “anomalies in the data” could be higher with no records being set… just speculation mind you…)

Produced from input file: ./DTemps/Temps.rM50194315000                                                                                                    
 
Thermometer Records, Average of Monthly dT/dt, Yearly running total
by Year Across Month, with a count of thermometer records in that year
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
YEAR     dT dT/yr  Count JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN JULY  AUG SEPT  OCT  NOV  DEC
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1992   0.66 -0.66    1  -1.5 -0.1 -0.8 -0.4  0.0  1.1  1.0 -2.0 -1.0 -4.2  0.0  0.0
1991   0.37  0.29    1   2.0  1.5  0.6  0.0  0.2  0.7  1.0  0.0 -0.6  2.8 -4.6 -0.1
1990  -0.47  0.83    1  -0.2 -1.0  2.2  1.5  0.4  2.4  0.4  1.8 -0.6 -0.1  3.3 -0.1
1989  -0.26 -0.21    1  -1.1  0.8 -1.3 -0.3  1.2 -2.6 -1.7 -0.2  0.9 -2.1  0.7  3.2
1988  -0.37  0.11    1   1.6  2.0  0.6 -1.5 -0.3 -0.4  0.2 -0.4 -0.1  3.1 -1.4 -2.1
1987  -0.56  0.19    1   0.1 -2.9 -2.7  0.1 -1.1  1.4  3.6  1.9  1.1  2.2  0.0 -1.4
1986  -0.15 -0.41    1  -2.2  0.7  1.7  2.1 -0.5  0.0 -2.4 -2.6 -1.3 -1.3  0.1  0.8
1985  -0.87  0.72    1   2.4 -0.8  3.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  1.2  1.5  2.2 -2.5  0.0  1.7
1984  -0.89  0.02    1   0.9 -0.2 -2.1  2.5  2.0 -0.3  0.0 -1.3 -3.1  1.2  0.9 -0.3
1983  -1.05  0.16    1   0.0  2.9  1.8 -2.2 -0.9  1.4 -1.1  0.0  1.1  0.1 -0.4 -0.8
1982  -0.73 -0.32    1  -1.6  0.6 -0.9 -2.6  0.0 -0.5  0.6  0.0 -1.3 -0.8  2.7  0.0
1981  -0.53 -0.20    1   0.7  0.0 -2.6  3.3 -0.7 -1.5 -0.2 -0.3 -0.8  2.5 -1.9 -0.9
1980  -0.47 -0.06    1  -1.9 -2.4  1.5 -2.3  2.9  0.3  0.1  0.9  3.4 -1.6 -2.2  0.6
1979  -1.68  1.21    1   1.0  1.4 -0.3  0.7 -0.3  2.1  1.8  1.1  2.1  0.6  2.4  1.9
1978  -0.43 -1.25    1  -0.9 -3.3  0.5  0.5 -0.9 -1.0 -2.3 -1.8 -1.3 -1.8 -1.1 -1.6
1977  -1.64  1.21    1   2.6  2.6  2.3  0.6  0.0  0.1  0.2  0.8 -0.6  3.7  3.2 -1.0
1976  -0.85 -0.79    1  -2.0  0.4 -2.5 -1.4 -1.6 -0.5 -1.5  0.5 -1.9  0.4 -2.5  3.1
1975  -1.26  0.41    1   2.8 -0.5  0.0  2.7  1.8  0.6  0.6 -1.7  0.6 -1.9  1.1 -1.2
1974  -0.12 -1.14    1  -1.1 -1.9 -0.8 -3.3 -1.6 -0.4 -2.5  0.3  1.1 -1.0 -1.7 -0.8
1973  -0.33  0.22    1  -0.7  1.5  0.7  1.4  0.3 -1.4  3.0  1.4 -2.0  1.0 -1.1 -1.5
1972  -1.43  1.10    1   0.0  0.5 -0.4  0.4  0.8  2.6  1.4  0.5  1.6  0.0  4.3  1.5
1971  -0.46 -0.97    1  -2.7 -1.1 -0.6 -1.3  0.8 -2.6 -1.4 -0.7  1.6 -2.1 -1.9  0.3
1970  -0.89  0.43    1   1.4  2.2  1.6  1.4 -1.6  2.7  0.2  0.0 -0.3  0.3 -1.8 -0.9
1969  -1.78  0.89    1   2.8 -1.5  1.0 -0.3  3.0 -2.1  0.9  2.8 -0.1  1.6  1.1  1.5
1968  -1.14 -0.64    1   0.0  1.9 -1.4 -0.7 -3.5  1.9  0.0 -1.8 -0.9 -2.3 -1.0  0.1
1967  -1.94  0.80    1  -2.3 -1.0  0.0  0.6  3.1 -0.9  0.0  0.5  2.0  3.6  3.0  1.0
1966  -0.26 -1.68    1  -0.2 -3.1  1.4 -0.2 -3.5 -2.0  0.1 -2.1 -3.0 -2.1 -2.6 -2.9
1965  -0.87  0.61    1   0.1  1.2 -2.3 -0.6  2.1  1.3 -0.5  0.3 -0.4  2.4  2.2  1.5
1964  -1.45  0.58    1   2.1  3.5  0.6  1.3 -0.4  1.9 -0.1  1.5  0.9 -2.6 -1.7  0.0
1963  -1.13 -0.32    1  -1.4 -0.7 -0.3 -0.9  0.4 -3.2  0.5  0.1  0.5  1.9  0.6 -1.4
1962  -0.86 -0.27    1   0.0  0.0  1.0 -0.3  0.3  2.3  1.1 -0.2 -1.3 -3.8 -1.6 -0.7
1961  -1.05  0.19    1   0.1  0.0 -0.8  0.1  1.1 -0.5 -2.3 -0.7  1.8  1.1  1.0  1.4
1960  -0.03 -1.02    1  -1.8 -3.5 -2.0 -1.2 -1.4 -0.3  2.0  0.1 -2.5  0.3 -2.0  0.0
1959  -0.72  0.69    1   2.6  0.1  2.5 -0.7 -3.5 -1.3  0.0  0.0  3.2  3.3  2.1  0.0
1958  -0.33 -0.39    1  -2.6  2.3 -0.7  0.4  1.8  0.6  0.1  0.1 -3.0 -3.2 -1.8  1.3
1957  -1.49  1.17    1   1.2 -0.8  2.6  1.5  3.3  1.5  0.2 -0.3  2.1  2.1  2.0 -1.4
1956  -1.48 -0.01    1   1.4 -0.1 -2.1  0.2 -0.8  1.2 -0.8 -0.4 -1.7  1.2  0.8  1.0
1955  -0.38 -1.10    1  -1.8 -0.9 -2.2  1.3 -2.5 -0.9 -0.9 -0.4  0.0 -2.9 -0.8 -1.2
1954  -0.81  0.42    1  -0.4  0.6  0.1 -1.5  2.1 -1.0 -0.8  2.8  2.3  1.0  0.1 -0.2
1953  -0.91  0.10    1   1.1 -1.3  1.9 -0.8 -0.2  1.0  1.0 -1.2 -2.0  0.2  0.2  1.3
1952  -0.53 -0.38    1   0.1  1.3 -1.2 -0.4 -0.2 -1.4  0.3  0.3  0.5  0.0 -3.1 -0.7
1951  -1.27  0.73    1  -0.6 -0.1  1.1  2.3 -0.9  2.7  1.4 -0.9 -0.1  1.1  2.7  0.1
1950  -2.08  0.81    1   0.5  4.1  1.4  1.7  2.1 -0.3 -1.4 -1.6  1.5  0.0  1.6  0.1
1949  -1.78 -0.29    1   1.0 -2.7  1.2 -1.0 -1.3 -0.5  0.2  2.0 -0.6 -1.8 -0.4  0.4
1948  -1.07 -0.72    1  -2.3 -0.4 -0.1 -1.3 -1.4 -3.0 -2.2 -0.5  0.9  2.6 -1.5  0.6
1947  -1.23  0.17    1   1.1  1.4 -1.1  2.4  0.0  2.3  1.1 -1.9 -0.8 -2.7  2.3 -2.1
1946  -0.37 -0.87    1  -0.8 -3.9 -0.7 -3.6  0.1 -1.3  0.3 -0.4 -0.1  1.5 -2.8  1.3
1945   0.26 -0.62    1  -0.4  0.2 -2.3  0.2  0.6  0.7  0.4  0.6 -4.2 -2.5 -0.7 -0.1
1944  -1.55  1.81    1   0.7  3.9  2.1  1.2  1.8  1.0  0.4  2.3  4.4  1.2  3.3 -0.6
1943  -1.53 -0.03    1   3.7 -0.2  1.7  0.6 -2.5 -0.9 -0.8 -1.9 -1.5  0.4 -0.9  2.0
1942  -0.21 -1.32    1  -4.0 -4.1 -0.3 -3.1 -0.4  0.4 -2.4  1.2 -0.4  0.6 -1.0 -2.3
1941  -0.35  0.14    1   2.9  1.6 -2.4  2.6  2.6 -1.2  1.9 -1.3 -0.9 -3.0 -0.7 -0.4
1940  -1.33  0.98    1  -0.5  0.7  0.8 -0.8 -2.4  2.3  3.1  2.5  2.3  2.5  1.0  0.3
1939   0.30 -1.63    1  -1.1 -0.1 -2.3 -0.8 -0.6 -2.2 -1.7 -1.9 -2.6 -3.3 -2.5 -0.5
1938  -0.67  0.97    1   1.3 -0.8  1.0  2.3 -0.3  0.5  0.8  1.1  2.6  1.9 -0.1  1.3
1937   0.27 -0.93    1  -3.0 -1.8 -0.2 -1.7  2.5  0.9 -2.7 -3.2 -1.6 -0.1  1.2 -1.5
1936  -1.17  1.43    1   2.3  2.3  2.1  1.4 -0.4  1.0  2.1  2.7  3.2  1.4 -1.2  0.3
1935  -1.69  0.52    1  -1.1 -0.3  2.1  0.7  0.4 -0.9 -0.4 -0.2 -1.1  1.3  5.1  0.7
1934  -0.99 -0.70    1  -1.6 -1.9 -2.7  0.3  0.0 -1.4 -0.4  2.0  0.1 -1.7 -2.4  1.3
1933  -0.67 -0.32    1   0.7  1.9 -2.0 -0.9  0.1  0.9 -0.8 -1.3 -0.3  0.6 -1.7 -1.0
1932  -1.42  0.75    1   1.8 -1.1  2.2 -1.1  1.7  1.4  0.2 -0.1  0.3  0.5  3.8 -0.6
1931  -0.36 -1.07    1  -2.3  0.9 -0.3 -0.3 -2.4 -3.3 -0.2 -0.3 -2.9 -0.3 -3.7  2.3
1930  -0.85  0.49    1  -0.7 -0.9  1.3  0.5 -1.8  2.7  2.6 -0.8  4.1 -0.1  0.0 -1.0
1929   0.13 -0.97    1   2.0  1.9 -3.5 -3.4  2.0 -0.2 -1.4 -2.6 -4.2 -1.1 -1.4  0.2
1928  -0.71  0.83    1   0.1 -0.1  2.6  5.1  0.7 -1.3 -0.5  1.9  0.8 -0.2  2.0 -1.1
1927  -0.31 -0.40    1  -0.1 -2.0  0.2 -2.8  0.8  1.5 -1.1  1.1 -0.4 -0.4 -2.0  0.4
1926  -1.27  0.96    1   1.9  3.1 -0.1  1.5 -2.7 -0.7  3.6  0.7  3.9  1.1  0.7 -1.5
1925   0.09 -1.36    1  -3.2 -3.5 -1.8 -0.2 -1.3 -1.5 -5.5 -0.8 -3.2  1.7  2.3  0.7
1924  -0.88  0.98    1   2.4  1.2  0.6 -1.0  2.5  2.2  3.3  0.6  2.0 -1.3 -1.7  0.9
1923  -0.59 -0.29    1  -2.8 -0.4  0.7  0.0  0.0 -0.9  1.9 -0.7 -1.8 -1.1  1.0  0.6
1922  -0.78  0.19    1   0.3  2.4  1.7  1.1 -2.0 -0.4 -2.0  0.9  1.6  1.4 -0.5 -2.2
1921  -1.10  0.32    1   0.3 -3.0 -1.2  2.5  2.6  0.9  0.5  0.0  0.0 -1.3  0.7  1.8
1920   0.05 -1.15    1   0.0  1.9 -1.6 -3.7 -1.9 -2.2 -1.7 -2.0 -0.8 -0.8 -0.8 -0.2
1919  -0.72  0.77    1   1.2  2.5  2.4  0.4  0.7  0.5  1.7  2.2 -1.8 -0.1 -0.3 -0.2
1918  -1.56  0.84    1   2.4 -0.4  0.0  1.7  2.6  2.3 -3.0  0.3  1.4  1.1  1.1  0.6
1917  -0.33 -1.23    1  -4.1 -3.0 -1.1 -0.4 -3.2 -3.4  3.6 -2.6 -1.5  0.9  1.4 -1.3
1916  -0.58  0.24    1   3.3  1.5 -1.2 -0.9  1.3  0.3 -1.6  2.7  2.9 -0.5 -4.0 -0.9
1915   0.17 -0.75    1  -0.7 -2.3 -1.0 -1.5 -0.2  1.4 -0.4 -3.5 -3.1 -2.8  2.9  2.2
1914  -0.94  1.12    1  -0.6  0.1  2.5  1.1  2.1  2.3 -0.9  2.1  3.0  3.1 -1.2 -0.2
1913  -0.36 -0.58    1  -2.3  0.8  0.0 -0.2 -3.1 -0.4  2.3 -0.5 -1.3 -1.8  0.3 -0.8
1912  -0.38  0.02    1   1.5  0.4 -2.2 -0.1  0.5  0.2 -0.5  0.3 -0.4  0.8 -0.9  0.7
1911  -0.35 -0.03    1  -1.5 -0.6  2.2 -0.4  0.2 -1.2  0.4 -0.6 -1.9  0.5  1.4  1.1
1910  -1.28  0.93    1   3.4  0.1 -1.5  2.5  1.2 -0.1 -0.2  2.5  2.1  0.9  1.2 -0.9
1909  -1.53  0.24    1  -2.9  1.6  2.1 -1.3 -0.4  1.4  1.4 -0.1  2.2  0.3 -2.2  0.8
1908  -0.95 -0.57    1   1.9 -0.9  0.7  0.3 -0.3 -0.9 -2.1 -1.7 -1.3 -2.0  1.3 -1.9
1907  -0.15 -0.80    1  -1.2 -1.3 -2.7 -3.5 -1.0 -2.1 -0.4  0.1  1.8  0.5 -0.7  0.9
1906  -0.86  0.71    1   0.2  1.0  0.1  1.6  0.5  2.7  1.3  0.2  0.1  1.4  0.7 -1.3
1905  -1.23  0.37    1  -0.2  0.8  0.7  1.9  0.7 -0.1  0.3 -0.1 -1.7  1.4 -0.6  1.3
1904  -1.06 -0.17    1   0.0 -0.6 -0.5  0.4 -1.1 -1.7 -0.3  0.2  0.7 -1.7  1.1  1.5
1903  -1.48  0.42    1   2.9  2.2  0.0 -0.1  1.3  1.0 -0.2 -0.4 -0.9  0.6 -0.4 -0.9
1902  -1.93  0.45    1   0.0  0.5  3.1  0.3 -0.3  1.1  2.1  2.5  0.0 -0.4 -1.7 -1.8
1901  -1.93  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
 
For Country Code 50194315000
 
From input file ./data/v2.mean.inv11.M.dt
 

So “Marble Bar” is modestly flat in the -1.x range until the 1980 “lift” we’ve seen before, then ramps up a bit and is dropped in 1992.

The “nearby” Post Office at Nullagine:

Produced from input file: ./DTemps/Temps.rM50194315001                                                                                                    
 
Thermometer Records, Average of Monthly dT/dt, Yearly running total
by Year Across Month, with a count of thermometer records in that year
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
YEAR     dT dT/yr  Count JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN JULY  AUG SEPT  OCT  NOV  DEC
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1983   0.07 -0.07    1  -0.8  2.7  1.9 -2.0 -0.9  1.7 -1.7 -0.7  0.2  0.0  0.0 -1.2
1982   0.21 -0.14    1  -2.1  0.9 -0.8 -2.3  0.1 -0.3  0.9  0.3 -0.5  0.0  3.1 -1.0
1981   0.41 -0.20    1   1.8 -0.5 -2.7  2.8 -1.2 -1.7 -0.7  0.5 -1.0  2.7 -2.2 -0.2
1980   0.07  0.34    1  -1.5 -1.4  1.5 -1.5  3.3  0.9  1.2  0.4  3.4 -1.6 -1.6  1.0
1979  -1.17  1.24    1   1.2  1.4 -0.5  0.8 -0.6  1.7  1.1  1.3  2.7  0.5  2.7  2.6
1978  -0.18 -0.99    1  -0.5 -3.3  2.7  0.3 -0.7 -0.4 -1.3 -1.5 -1.4 -2.0 -1.4 -2.4
1977  -0.99  0.81    1   1.3  1.7  0.0  0.1  0.1  0.1 -0.4  0.9 -0.5  4.0  2.9 -0.5
1976  -0.65 -0.34    1  -1.6  1.3 -2.2 -0.5 -1.0 -0.2 -1.5  0.7 -2.0  1.1 -1.6  3.4
1975  -0.51 -0.14    1   2.5 -0.3  0.1  2.3  1.1 -1.3  0.5 -2.2  0.8 -2.6 -1.2 -1.4
1974   0.41 -0.92    1  -0.7 -0.9 -0.4 -2.9 -0.1  0.0 -3.1  0.0 -1.5 -0.6  0.0 -0.8
1973  -0.20  0.61    1   0.0  0.0  0.6  1.2  0.0 -0.2  3.8  1.8  0.0 -0.6  2.6 -1.9
1972  -0.33  0.13    1  -2.1 -0.4 -1.6  0.1 -0.4  2.4  0.5  0.1  1.4  0.5  0.0  1.1
1971  -0.61  0.28    1   0.0  0.0  1.3 -0.5  1.1 -0.1 -0.4  1.9  2.5 -2.0 -1.5  1.0
1970  -0.53 -0.08    1   0.0  1.9  0.0  0.0 -2.5  0.0  0.4  0.0 -0.8  2.0 -1.6 -0.3
1969  -0.82  0.28    1   0.3 -1.6  0.8  0.0  2.8  0.0  1.1  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
1968  -0.62 -0.19    1   0.0  0.2  0.7  0.0  0.5  0.0 -0.5 -3.2  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
1966  -0.57 -0.05    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0 -0.6  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
1965  -0.57  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
1964  -1.11  0.53    1   3.8  1.0  0.6  1.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
1963  -0.88 -0.22    1  -0.2 -0.4  0.5  1.6  1.3 -3.0  0.5 -0.4 -0.9  0.6 -0.5 -1.8
1962  -0.87 -0.01    1  -0.5  0.1 -0.7 -2.3 -0.9  3.6  1.2  0.9  0.4 -2.3  0.4  0.0
1961  -1.24  0.37    1   0.5  0.0  0.7  0.3  2.6 -0.7 -2.7 -0.3  2.1  0.7  0.0  1.2
1960   0.33 -1.57    1  -2.0 -3.1 -2.3 -2.0 -2.3 -0.4 -0.2 -1.9 -3.6  0.3 -2.2  0.9
1959  -0.27  0.60    1  -0.3 -0.3  2.0  0.1 -1.7 -0.8  2.3  1.6  3.4 -0.1  1.8 -0.8
1958  -0.42  0.15    1   0.0  2.1  0.0  0.0  1.2  0.0  0.4 -0.4 -1.0  0.0 -2.1  1.6
1957  -0.42  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
1956  -0.57  0.15    1   1.6  0.7 -1.0  0.9  0.0  0.3 -0.6 -1.1 -2.4  1.4  0.7  1.3
1955   0.46 -1.03    1  -2.1 -1.2 -3.2  0.9 -1.8 -0.2 -0.9 -0.2  0.1 -2.8 -0.3 -0.7
1954   0.34  0.12    1   0.0  1.1  0.8 -3.2  1.3 -1.8 -1.0  2.8  2.3  0.9 -0.7 -1.1
1953   0.31  0.03    1   0.6 -1.7  1.4  0.4 -0.3  1.5  1.0 -1.4 -1.7 -0.8  0.4  1.0
1952   0.43 -0.12    1  -0.5  0.7 -1.9  0.1  0.4 -1.5  0.6  1.0  0.3  1.2 -1.9  0.1
1951  -0.27  0.69    1  -0.1  0.1  3.5  3.1 -2.2  2.7  1.3 -1.9 -0.6  0.8  1.9 -0.3
1950  -0.78  0.52    1  -1.0  3.7 -0.6  1.2  2.4 -0.5 -1.0 -1.0  1.8  0.0  1.1  0.1
1949  -0.37 -0.42    1   2.4 -2.2  2.1 -1.8 -1.2 -0.4 -1.0  1.8 -0.9 -2.6 -0.5 -0.7
1948  -0.02 -0.34    1  -2.8 -1.2 -0.8 -0.5  0.0 -2.3 -0.9 -0.5  1.8  3.2 -2.1  2.0
1947  -0.02  0.00    1   0.7  2.3 -1.4  2.4 -1.1  1.4  0.4 -1.9 -1.4 -2.2  3.0 -2.2
1946   0.20 -0.22    1   0.9 -3.6 -0.1 -2.3  1.5 -0.1  1.3 -0.5  0.2  1.6 -2.4  0.8
1945   0.29 -0.09    1  -0.1  1.6 -0.9 -0.8  0.7  1.2  0.3  0.9 -2.6 -1.8  0.2  0.2
1944  -0.38  0.67    1   0.3  2.2  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.1 -1.4  2.0  2.7  0.4  1.8  0.0
1943  -0.27 -0.11    1   2.3  1.0  1.4  1.2 -2.4 -1.8  0.3 -2.1 -1.9  0.0 -0.5  1.2
1942   0.82 -1.09    1  -2.5 -5.2 -1.2 -0.2 -1.8  1.3 -2.3  1.4  0.2 -0.5 -1.0 -1.3
1941   0.56  0.26    1   1.5  2.2  0.0  0.0  4.4 -0.9  1.9 -1.2 -1.1 -2.2 -0.2 -1.3
1940  -0.08  0.64    1  -0.4  0.0  0.3 -1.5 -2.8  0.9  2.1  2.6  2.3  2.9  0.5  0.8
1939   1.19 -1.28    1  -0.8 -0.1 -1.9  0.1 -0.5 -1.1 -0.8 -1.0 -2.6 -3.2 -2.9 -0.5
1938  -0.17  1.36    1   1.6 -0.5  1.7  2.6  0.3  0.3  1.5  0.8  4.0  2.4  1.4  0.2
1937   0.72 -0.88    1  -2.7 -0.6  0.6 -1.0  2.7  1.0 -3.1 -3.8 -3.1 -1.2  0.8 -0.2
1936  -0.20  0.92    1   1.8  1.2 -0.1  0.3 -0.5  1.1  1.5  2.3  2.6  1.8 -1.4  0.4
1935  -0.76  0.56    1  -0.6 -0.5  2.0  0.3  0.7 -1.3  0.2  0.5 -0.8  0.9  4.5  0.8
1934  -0.71 -0.05    1   0.1 -1.1 -2.5  1.3  0.0 -0.7 -0.6  2.1  0.9 -0.4 -1.2  1.5
1933  -0.41 -0.30    1  -1.6  2.4 -0.9 -2.5 -1.0  2.0 -0.3 -1.0  0.6  0.4 -1.0 -0.7
1932  -1.13  0.73    1   2.9 -1.5  1.8  0.0  2.6 -0.1 -0.2 -0.1 -0.2  1.1  2.8 -0.4
1931  -0.02 -1.12    1  -2.0  1.5 -0.2 -0.2 -1.6 -2.4 -0.5 -1.1 -3.3 -1.4 -3.7  1.5
1930  -0.23  0.22    1  -0.6 -1.2 -0.3  0.3 -1.4  1.7  2.0 -0.5  4.1  0.1 -0.6 -1.0
1929   0.17 -0.40    1   1.6  1.8 -1.0 -2.3  1.5  1.1  0.0 -1.7 -3.8 -0.5 -0.7 -0.8
1928  -0.67  0.83    1   0.4 -0.9  1.4  5.5  0.9 -1.7 -0.3  1.5  0.9  0.0  1.9  0.4
1927  -0.60 -0.07    1   1.3 -1.3  1.0 -3.3  0.3  1.7 -0.8  1.9 -0.1 -0.4 -1.7  0.6
1926  -1.03  0.43    1  -0.2  2.8 -0.6  1.3 -2.9 -0.5  2.9  0.0  3.8  0.4  0.5 -2.3
1925   0.14 -1.17    1  -2.9 -2.5 -1.2  0.3 -1.3 -1.4 -5.0 -0.9 -4.2  1.6  2.3  1.1
1924  -0.54  0.68    1   2.2  0.3 -0.2 -1.9  2.2  1.6  2.6  0.6  3.1 -1.3 -1.3  0.3
1923  -0.44 -0.10    1  -2.6 -0.4  1.3  0.3  0.2 -1.5  2.6 -0.4 -1.7 -0.5  0.9  0.6
1922  -0.25 -0.19    1   0.7  1.8  0.8  1.3 -2.5 -0.8 -2.6  0.5  0.9  1.0 -1.1 -2.3
1921  -0.84  0.59    1  -0.1 -2.4 -0.7  1.7  3.3  1.6  0.7  0.1  0.2 -0.9  1.2  2.4
1920   0.73 -1.58    1   0.5  2.5 -0.7 -3.2 -2.7 -4.0 -3.5 -3.1 -2.0 -1.0 -1.2 -0.5
1919  -0.05  0.78    1  -0.1  0.9  1.4  0.1  1.2  1.5  3.6  2.7 -1.6 -0.2 -0.2  0.1
1918  -0.97  0.92    1   2.2  1.3 -0.2  0.9  3.0  4.2 -3.7  0.4  1.9  1.4  0.3 -0.6
1917   0.27 -1.24    1  -3.6 -4.6 -1.3  0.8 -3.4 -4.8  4.0 -3.0 -1.0 -0.2  1.8  0.4
1916   0.03  0.23    1   3.7  1.4 -1.0 -1.4  1.6 -0.2 -1.6  3.4  2.4  0.3 -3.6 -2.2
1915   0.96 -0.92    1  -0.7 -1.7 -1.8 -1.5 -0.5  2.2 -0.9 -3.9 -2.9 -2.8  2.0  1.4
1914   0.05  0.91    1  -1.6  0.1  2.3  0.5  1.2  2.5 -0.4  2.3  3.0  2.0 -1.0  0.0
1913   0.05 -0.00    1  -1.8  1.3  1.8  1.8 -2.1 -0.3  1.4 -1.0 -1.2 -0.5  1.1 -0.5
1912   0.51 -0.46    1   1.3 -1.3 -2.6 -1.3 -0.7 -0.9  0.2  1.5 -0.1 -0.1 -1.8  0.3
1911   0.70 -0.19    1  -0.9 -0.6  2.1 -0.4 -0.3 -1.4 -0.3 -1.7 -2.8  1.7  1.6  0.7
1910  -0.18  0.88    1   2.1  1.4 -2.4  1.7  2.1 -0.1  0.5  2.2  2.0 -0.7  0.9  0.9
1909  -0.56  0.38    1  -1.4  1.1  2.7 -0.5 -1.0  2.0  1.4 -0.2  2.2  0.7 -2.1 -0.4
1908   0.07 -0.62    1   0.7 -1.5 -0.2 -0.5  0.3 -1.1 -2.7 -0.7 -1.0 -1.5  1.8 -1.1
1907   1.20 -1.13    1  -1.0 -2.0 -2.1 -3.7 -1.0 -2.4 -0.6 -0.6  1.4 -0.2 -1.2 -0.2
1906   0.20  1.00    1   0.6  1.8 -0.7  2.0 -0.5  2.4  2.8  0.7  1.1  2.0  0.9 -1.1
1905  -0.27  0.47    1   0.4  1.8  0.8  2.9  1.2  0.3 -1.6 -0.4 -2.9  0.9 -0.3  2.5
1904  -0.02 -0.24    1   0.0 -1.3 -0.2 -1.6 -0.2 -1.4  1.1  0.1  1.2 -1.3  0.0  0.7
1903  -0.85  0.82    1   2.3  2.2  0.5  1.8  1.4  0.9 -0.1 -0.5 -0.6  1.0  1.1 -0.1
1902  -0.42 -0.43    1  -3.3  0.3  3.0 -0.5 -0.8  0.5  0.7  2.0 -1.3 -1.1 -2.8 -1.9
1901   0.01 -0.42    1   0.4 -4.7  0.2  0.4  1.0 -2.2  0.9 -0.2  2.4 -2.8  1.4 -1.9
1900  -1.03  1.04    1   3.4  4.0 -0.3  0.0  0.9  2.4 -0.9 -0.3 -2.8  3.6 -0.3  2.8
1899  -1.04  0.01    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0 -0.9  1.2 -0.2
1898  -1.04  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
 
For Country Code 50194315001
 

Is very similar. But cuts off in 1983. It does start further back in time. Odd given the higher station number.

Then we have Port Hedland.

 
Produced from input file: ./DTemps/Temps.rM50194312000                                                                                                    
 
Thermometer Records, Average of Monthly dT/dt, Yearly running total
by Year Across Month, with a count of thermometer records in that year
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
YEAR     dT dT/yr  Count JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN JULY  AUG SEPT  OCT  NOV  DEC
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2010  -0.01  0.01    1   0.1  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
2009  -0.22  0.22    1  -0.5 -0.1 -0.1  0.0 -1.0 -0.1  1.8  0.1 -1.6 -0.4  2.5  2.0
2008  -1.10  0.88    1   1.3 -0.2  1.9  1.2  0.5  2.3 -0.5  1.1  1.5  2.3 -1.5  0.6
2007  -1.09 -0.01    1   1.2  0.9 -1.3  1.1  1.1 -0.1  2.1 -0.8  0.0 -2.2 -1.2 -0.9
2006  -0.70 -0.39    1  -2.2 -1.3 -1.3 -3.0 -1.9 -0.7 -2.5  0.8  1.2  3.5  2.1  0.6
2005  -0.80  0.10    1   1.2  2.1  1.5  1.6  2.1 -1.6 -0.7  0.6  0.3 -3.3 -1.3 -1.3
2004  -1.18  0.38    1  -0.2 -1.2  0.5  0.9 -1.6 -0.3  0.7 -0.6 -0.5  3.3  1.3  2.2
2003  -0.85 -0.33    1   0.4  1.4 -1.7 -1.4 -0.9  1.7  0.3 -0.4  1.0 -2.4 -0.7 -1.2
2002  -1.85  1.00    1   0.3  0.1  2.3  1.2  1.2 -0.1  0.5 -0.2 -1.1  3.5  1.8  2.5
2001  -2.08  0.23    1   1.7 -0.5  0.5  0.4  3.5  1.4 -0.6  1.5 -1.0 -2.0  0.4 -2.5
2000  -1.70 -0.38    1  -2.3  1.5 -1.5  1.9 -2.6 -2.3  1.2 -1.9  0.4  0.5 -0.5  1.0
1999  -0.46 -1.24    1   0.9 -3.0 -1.0 -3.2 -2.4  0.3 -0.7 -0.6 -0.7 -2.5 -1.5 -0.5
1998  -1.68  1.22    1   0.7  2.2  0.8  1.2  2.7  0.6  1.0  1.6  1.7  1.4  1.0 -0.3
1997  -0.60 -1.07    1  -1.8 -0.8 -0.4 -0.7 -0.1 -3.1 -2.2 -1.4 -0.8 -1.1 -0.4 -0.1
1996  -1.44  0.84    1   0.7  1.3  1.1  0.0  0.4  2.6  1.4 -0.6 -0.3  2.3 -0.2  1.4
1995  -0.36 -1.08    1  -1.8 -2.5 -1.3  0.6 -1.3 -0.5 -0.5  1.2 -0.8 -2.8 -1.3 -2.0
1994  -0.72  0.36    1   0.7  0.2 -0.4 -2.7 -0.9  0.0  0.8  0.4  1.7  3.3  1.8 -0.6
1993  -0.88  0.16    1   0.6  0.3  0.1  1.5  0.9 -1.4 -2.2  0.7  0.4 -1.4  0.6  1.8
1992  -0.33 -0.55    1  -0.7 -0.2 -0.5 -0.1  0.0  0.9  1.0 -1.7 -0.8 -3.3  0.0 -1.2
1991  -0.43  0.11    1   0.5  0.2  0.3  0.1  0.4  0.9  1.0  0.6 -0.8  2.7 -4.6  0.0
1990  -1.23  0.80    1  -0.3 -0.5  1.4  1.2  0.3  1.6  0.2  1.3 -0.5  0.6  3.4  0.9
1989  -0.38 -0.85    1   0.4 -1.0 -1.6 -0.9 -0.5 -2.5 -1.4 -1.1  0.7 -2.6 -0.4  0.7
1988  -0.77  0.39    1   0.1  1.6  0.3 -1.0 -0.6  0.4 -0.1  0.2 -0.1  3.5  1.3 -0.9
1987  -1.05  0.28    1  -0.8 -0.2 -0.9  0.2  0.8 -0.2  2.7  1.7  1.0  1.3 -2.1 -0.2
1986  -0.99 -0.06    1   0.5 -0.4  1.1  1.0  0.2  1.4 -1.8 -1.3 -0.5 -0.9  0.2 -0.2
1985  -0.83 -0.16    1  -0.5 -0.8  1.6  0.1 -1.5 -0.3  0.3  0.2  1.2 -3.2  0.1  0.9
1984  -0.87  0.03    1   1.2  0.3 -1.1  1.9  1.6 -0.4  0.7 -1.0 -3.0  1.1  0.2 -1.1
1983  -0.78 -0.08    1  -1.2  2.2  1.0 -1.7  0.5  0.6 -1.1 -0.7  1.3 -0.2 -0.9 -0.8
1982  -0.75 -0.03    1   0.3 -0.3  0.0 -1.8 -0.8  0.3  0.0  0.2 -1.9 -0.5  3.0  1.1
1981  -0.42 -0.33    1   0.2 -0.2 -2.4  1.8 -1.0 -1.8  0.5 -0.4 -0.2  2.0 -1.6 -0.9
1980  -0.74  0.32    1   0.8 -1.0  1.1 -0.2  2.8  0.6  0.0  0.5  2.6 -1.1 -1.5 -0.7
1979  -1.45  0.71    1  -1.6  0.1 -0.4  0.0 -0.3  1.5  1.6  1.3  1.8  0.5  1.4  2.6
1978  -0.83 -0.62    1   0.3 -0.9  1.2  0.1 -1.1 -0.5 -1.8 -1.2 -0.7 -1.1 -0.7 -1.0
1977  -1.66  0.82    1   1.3  0.8  0.9  0.5  0.4  0.2  0.0  0.6 -0.3  2.9  2.8 -0.2
1976  -0.93 -0.73    1  -0.4  0.9 -1.9 -0.6 -1.1 -0.7 -1.4  0.5 -2.1 -0.4 -1.9  0.3
1975  -1.30  0.37    1   0.8 -0.3  0.6  1.5  0.6 -0.4  1.1 -0.8  1.4 -0.9  1.2 -0.3
1974  -0.13 -1.17    1  -1.2 -2.0 -0.8 -1.3 -1.1  0.2 -3.2 -1.1  0.4 -1.3 -1.7 -0.9
1973  -0.47  0.33    1   0.4  0.6  0.9  0.5  0.6 -0.5  3.3  1.9 -1.8  0.4 -1.7 -0.6
1972  -1.55  1.08    1   0.1  1.2 -0.2  0.3  0.6  2.6  1.1  0.1  0.9  0.8  3.9  1.6
1971  -0.81 -0.74    1  -1.0 -0.2  0.1 -0.7  0.2 -3.5 -1.3 -0.7  1.4 -1.5 -1.1 -0.6
1970  -1.26  0.45    1   0.1  0.4 -0.2  0.7 -1.4  2.8  0.3  0.7 -0.2  0.9 -0.5  1.8
1969  -1.20 -0.06    1   0.4 -0.7  0.4 -0.6  2.4 -2.5  0.8  1.4 -0.7 -0.3 -0.5 -0.8
1968  -1.23  0.03    1   1.5  1.1  0.2 -0.5 -3.0  2.5  0.5 -1.2  0.1 -0.5 -1.2  0.9
1967  -1.69  0.46    1  -1.6 -0.1 -0.6  0.3  2.7 -1.4 -0.5  0.2  1.6  2.3  3.2 -0.6
1966  -0.55 -1.14    1  -0.3 -2.2  0.7  0.0 -2.6 -1.9 -0.6 -1.0 -2.1 -1.2 -1.5 -1.0
1965  -0.83  0.28    1   0.2  1.1 -1.2 -0.3  1.4  1.1 -0.5 -0.3 -0.5  1.0  0.6  0.7
1964  -1.29  0.47    1   1.1  1.9  0.2  0.7  0.4  2.0  0.3  1.3  0.3 -2.0 -0.9  0.3
1963  -0.87 -0.42    1  -0.5 -1.3 -0.1 -0.5  0.3 -3.4  0.4 -0.4  0.4  2.2  0.0 -2.2
1962  -0.99  0.12    1  -0.2  1.1  0.7 -0.4 -0.7  2.7  1.5  0.9 -0.1 -3.7 -0.7  0.4
1961  -1.29  0.30    1   1.0 -0.3  0.1  0.0  1.7 -0.4 -2.5 -1.3  1.0  1.6  0.9  1.8
1960  -0.57 -0.72    1  -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -1.0 -1.3 -0.4 -0.4 -1.4 -1.9  0.6 -0.7  0.5
1959  -0.82  0.25    1   0.4 -1.0  1.2 -0.2 -3.2 -1.0  2.1  1.6  1.8  1.9  0.0 -0.6
1958  -1.00  0.18    1  -0.4  1.7 -0.4  1.8  2.0  1.3  0.8  0.5 -1.2 -2.5 -0.7 -0.7
1957  -1.93  0.92    1   0.0 -0.3  1.0  0.1  3.1  1.0  0.0 -1.3  0.7  2.9  2.0  1.9
1956  -1.27 -0.66    1   0.7 -0.6 -1.6 -0.2 -1.4  0.6 -1.5 -0.3 -2.1  0.0 -0.3 -1.2
1955  -0.67 -0.60    1  -1.0 -0.8 -0.5  0.6 -2.2 -0.4 -0.4  0.4  1.3 -3.2 -0.1 -0.9
1954  -1.23  0.57    1   0.6  2.1 -0.8 -2.0  2.1 -0.9 -0.1  2.4  1.2  2.0 -0.2  0.4
1953  -1.59  0.36    1   0.1 -1.8  1.4  1.1 -0.6  1.3 -0.4 -0.2 -0.6  0.9  1.3  1.8
1952  -1.42 -0.17    1   1.7  1.2  0.0 -0.2  0.5 -1.6  0.9 -0.4  0.4 -0.2 -3.5 -0.9
1951  -1.63  0.22    1  -2.0 -0.3  0.2  1.4 -0.9  2.0  1.6 -1.2 -0.7 -0.1  3.0 -0.4
1950  -1.84  0.21    1  -0.1  1.6  0.1  1.2  1.3 -0.8 -1.2 -1.3  1.1  0.9  1.0 -1.3
1949  -1.70 -0.14    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0 -1.3  1.4 -1.1 -2.5 -0.1  1.9
1948  -1.70  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
 
For Country Code 50194312000
 
From input file ./data/v2.mean.inv11.M.dt

That looks to me like it warms a bunch, but mostly a bit later in the series. (Chart will make it more clear).

So what does it look like when we splice all the “nearby” stations together?

A Splicing We Will Go, A Splicing We Will Go

The combined set of Seven “nearby” stations:

Produced from input file: ./DTemps/Temps.rM5019431                                                                                                        
 
Thermometer Records, Average of Monthly dT/dt, Yearly running total
by Year Across Month, with a count of thermometer records in that year
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
YEAR     dT dT/yr  Count JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN JULY  AUG SEPT  OCT  NOV  DEC
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2010  -0.06  0.06    2   0.7  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
2009  -0.39  0.33    2   0.2 -1.2 -0.3 -0.1 -0.6 -0.9  0.6  1.2 -0.2  1.0  2.3  2.0
2008  -0.74  0.35    2   0.6 -0.1  0.9  0.6  0.2  1.1 -0.2  0.6  0.8  1.1 -1.1 -0.3
2007  -0.73 -0.01    1   1.2  0.9 -1.3  1.1  1.1 -0.1  2.1 -0.8  0.0 -2.2 -1.2 -0.9
2006  -0.34 -0.39    1  -2.2 -1.3 -1.3 -3.0 -1.9 -0.7 -2.5  0.8  1.2  3.5  2.1  0.6
2005  -0.44  0.10    1   1.2  2.1  1.5  1.6  2.1 -1.6 -0.7  0.6  0.3 -3.3 -1.3 -1.3
2004  -0.81  0.38    1  -0.2 -1.2  0.5  0.9 -1.6 -0.3  0.7 -0.6 -0.5  3.3  1.3  2.2
2003  -0.49 -0.33    1   0.4  1.4 -1.7 -1.4 -0.9  1.7  0.3 -0.4  1.0 -2.4 -0.7 -1.2
2002  -1.49  1.00    1   0.3  0.1  2.3  1.2  1.2 -0.1  0.5 -0.2 -1.1  3.5  1.8  2.5
2001  -1.72  0.23    1   1.7 -0.5  0.5  0.4  3.5  1.4 -0.6  1.5 -1.0 -2.0  0.4 -2.5
2000  -1.34 -0.38    1  -2.3  1.5 -1.5  1.9 -2.6 -2.3  1.2 -1.9  0.4  0.5 -0.5  1.0
1999  -0.10 -1.24    1   0.9 -3.0 -1.0 -3.2 -2.4  0.3 -0.7 -0.6 -0.7 -2.5 -1.5 -0.5
1998  -1.31  1.22    1   0.7  2.2  0.8  1.2  2.7  0.6  1.0  1.6  1.7  1.4  1.0 -0.3
1997  -0.24 -1.07    1  -1.8 -0.8 -0.4 -0.7 -0.1 -3.1 -2.2 -1.4 -0.8 -1.1 -0.4 -0.1
1996  -1.08  0.84    1   0.7  1.3  1.1  0.0  0.4  2.6  1.4 -0.6 -0.3  2.3 -0.2  1.4
1995   0.00 -1.08    1  -1.8 -2.5 -1.3  0.6 -1.3 -0.5 -0.5  1.2 -0.8 -2.8 -1.3 -2.0
1994  -0.35  0.36    1   0.7  0.2 -0.4 -2.7 -0.9  0.0  0.8  0.4  1.7  3.3  1.8 -0.6
1993  -0.51  0.16    1   0.6  0.3  0.1  1.5  0.9 -1.4 -2.2  0.7  0.4 -1.4  0.6  1.8
1992   0.20 -0.71    6  -2.0 -0.6 -0.7 -0.8 -1.0  1.1  0.9 -1.7 -1.1 -2.6  0.0 -0.2
1991  -0.14  0.34    6   1.9  2.2  0.3  0.3  0.3  0.5  0.8 -0.1 -0.6  2.3 -3.6 -0.3
1990  -0.80  0.66    6  -0.2 -1.6  1.7  1.1  0.6  1.5  0.2  1.7 -0.6  0.2  2.7  0.8
1989  -0.27 -0.53    6  -1.2  0.1 -1.4 -0.6  1.0 -2.4 -1.8 -0.6  0.7 -2.5  0.8  1.7
1988  -0.71  0.44    6   1.5  1.6  0.7 -1.1 -0.1  0.3  0.7  0.2  0.1  2.7  0.1 -1.4
1987  -0.79  0.08    6  -0.3 -1.3 -1.9  0.5 -0.9  0.1  2.8  1.4  0.9  2.1 -1.4 -1.1
1986  -0.46 -0.33    6  -1.3 -0.2  1.2  1.0 -0.0  0.8 -2.5 -1.7 -0.8 -1.1 -0.1  0.7
1985  -0.87  0.40    6   1.2 -0.6  2.4  0.3 -1.0 -0.2  1.2  0.8  1.5 -2.5  0.3  1.5
1984  -0.60 -0.27    6   0.7  0.7 -1.8  1.8  0.9 -0.8 -0.1 -1.4 -3.0  0.6  0.1 -1.1
1983  -0.86  0.26    7   0.0  2.2  1.7 -1.6  0.4  1.9 -1.1 -0.3  1.4 -0.2 -0.5 -0.8
1982  -0.63 -0.23    7  -1.6  0.4 -0.5 -2.2 -0.3 -0.3  0.6  0.2 -1.8 -0.2  2.9  0.1
1981  -0.34 -0.29    7   0.7 -0.8 -3.1  2.9 -0.9 -1.6 -0.2 -0.2 -0.5  2.4 -1.8 -0.7
1980  -0.51  0.17    7  -0.9 -1.2  1.6 -1.6  3.0  0.3 -0.1  1.0  3.2 -1.9 -1.5  0.1
1979  -1.50  0.99    7   0.6  0.9 -0.2  0.2 -0.7  1.7  1.6  0.9  2.2  0.9  1.7  2.1
1978  -0.51 -0.99    7  -0.5 -2.4  1.0  0.4 -0.9 -1.0 -1.9 -1.9 -1.6 -1.2 -0.8 -0.9
1977  -1.34  0.83    7   1.5  1.6  1.2  0.4  0.0  0.3  0.1  0.8 -0.4  3.1  2.5 -1.1
1976  -1.01 -0.33    7  -1.1  0.8 -1.4 -0.4 -1.0 -0.4 -0.9  0.9 -1.5  0.4 -1.6  2.3
1975  -1.21  0.20    7   1.8 -0.2 -0.1  1.6  1.2  0.2  0.3 -0.9  0.6 -1.4  0.2 -0.9
1974  -0.45 -0.76    7  -1.1 -1.8 -0.6 -1.7 -1.2 -0.3 -1.1  0.1  0.6 -0.9 -0.8 -0.3
1973  -0.69  0.24    6  -0.1  1.1  0.5  0.8  0.5 -0.9  2.2  1.1 -1.5  0.2  0.1 -1.3
1972  -1.30  0.62    6  -0.4  0.4 -0.4  0.2  0.3  1.9  0.5  0.2  1.1  0.5  2.2  0.9
1971  -0.67 -0.63    5  -1.5 -0.6 -0.1 -0.9  0.8 -2.0 -1.1 -0.0  1.7 -2.1 -1.7  0.1
1970  -0.91  0.24    5   0.3  1.4  0.5  0.5 -2.1  2.3  0.2  0.0 -0.5  0.9 -1.3  0.6
1969  -1.50  0.58    5   1.2 -1.2  1.2 -0.0  3.0 -1.5  1.4  2.0 -0.3  0.8  0.2  0.1
1968  -1.11 -0.38    5   1.3  1.6 -0.1 -0.8 -2.9  1.1 -0.3 -2.2 -0.6 -1.5 -0.7  0.5
1967  -1.73  0.61    4  -1.9 -0.6 -0.4  0.5  2.2 -0.7 -0.1  0.3  1.4  3.5  3.0  0.0
1966  -0.91 -0.82    5   0.1 -1.7  0.7 -0.2 -1.8 -1.1 -0.3 -0.9 -1.4 -1.2 -1.2 -1.0
1965  -1.17  0.27    4   0.1  0.9 -1.7 -0.1  1.3  0.9 -0.6 -0.1 -0.2  1.4  0.9  0.5
1964  -1.62  0.45    4   2.2  2.5  0.6  0.9 -0.2  1.4  0.0  0.7  0.1 -2.0 -0.9  0.2
1963  -1.32 -0.30    4  -0.3 -1.0 -0.1 -0.4  0.6 -3.2  0.6 -0.2  0.1  1.8  0.0 -1.5
1962  -1.17 -0.15    4  -0.7  0.5  0.2 -0.6 -0.3  2.5  1.2  0.6 -0.5 -3.5 -1.0 -0.3
1961  -1.60  0.43    4   0.4  0.1  0.1  0.3  1.8 -0.1 -2.2 -0.6  2.0  1.0  0.9  1.5
1960  -0.34 -1.27    4  -1.8 -3.0 -2.0 -1.7 -1.8 -0.6  0.1 -1.1 -2.6  0.6 -1.8  0.6
1959  -1.23  0.90    4   1.2  0.1  2.5  0.1 -1.5 -0.1  2.0  1.1  2.7  1.8  1.5 -0.6
1958  -1.19 -0.04    4  -0.8  1.5 -0.3  0.6  1.2  0.5  0.2  0.0 -1.5 -1.5 -1.0  0.5
1957  -1.89  0.70    3   0.4 -0.4  1.2  0.5  2.1  0.8  0.1 -0.5  0.9  1.7  1.3  0.2
1956  -1.77 -0.12    4   1.2 -0.0 -1.4  0.6 -0.6  0.2 -0.9 -0.5 -1.9  0.8  0.5  0.6
1955  -0.70 -1.08    4  -1.6 -0.9 -2.2  0.7 -2.2 -0.4 -1.2 -0.4  0.1 -3.0 -0.9 -1.0
1954  -1.19  0.50    4  -0.0  1.1  0.5 -2.3  1.5 -1.2 -0.6  2.7  2.5  1.7  0.4 -0.2
1953  -1.45  0.25    4   0.8 -1.2  1.4  0.6 -0.2  1.2  1.0 -0.8 -1.6  0.1  0.4  1.4
1952  -1.19 -0.25    4   0.3  0.8 -0.8 -0.1  0.2 -1.1  0.4  0.2  0.3  0.1 -3.0 -0.4
1951  -1.60  0.41    4  -0.7 -0.1  1.2  1.7 -1.0  1.9  1.1 -1.0 -0.3  0.4  1.9 -0.2
1950  -2.11  0.50    4   0.1  2.8  0.5  1.8  2.0 -0.9 -1.4 -1.1  1.1  0.4  1.2 -0.3
1949  -1.73 -0.38    4   0.8 -1.6  0.7 -1.2 -1.4 -0.2 -0.2  1.6 -0.9 -2.3 -0.5  0.6
1948  -1.55 -0.18    4  -1.3 -0.3 -0.1 -0.4 -0.2 -1.3 -0.9 -0.6  0.8  2.0 -0.7  0.8
1947  -1.71  0.17    3   0.5  1.9 -0.3  2.3 -0.3  2.0  0.6 -1.2 -1.1 -3.0  1.8 -1.1
1946  -1.13 -0.58    3  -0.2 -2.8 -1.0 -2.9  0.4 -1.2  0.7  0.1  0.5  1.5 -2.7  0.6
1945  -0.82 -0.31    3   0.2  0.4 -1.4 -0.0  0.7  1.0  0.0  0.4 -2.9 -1.8 -0.3  0.0
1944  -2.04  1.23    3   0.3  2.6  1.5  0.8  0.4  0.4  0.2  2.0  3.2  1.6  2.4 -0.6
1943  -2.00 -0.04    3   2.3 -0.2  1.1  0.4 -1.3 -0.5 -0.2 -1.7 -1.1  0.3 -0.8  1.3
1942  -0.69 -1.32    3  -2.5 -3.5 -1.3 -1.5 -0.8 -0.4 -2.6  0.4 -0.5 -0.7 -0.8 -1.7
1941  -1.07  0.38    3   1.5  1.3 -0.8  0.9  2.3 -0.1  2.1 -0.5 -0.4 -1.7  0.0  0.1
1940  -1.88  0.81    2  -0.4  0.3  0.6 -1.1 -2.6  1.6  2.6  2.5  2.3  2.7  0.8  0.6
1939  -0.86 -1.02    3  -0.6 -0.1 -1.4 -0.2 -0.4 -1.1 -1.1 -1.3 -1.7 -2.2 -1.8 -0.3
1938  -2.02  1.16    2   1.5 -0.6  1.4  2.5  0.0  0.4  1.1  0.9  3.3  2.2  0.6  0.8
1937  -1.11 -0.91    2  -2.8 -1.2  0.2 -1.4  2.6  0.9 -2.9 -3.5 -2.3 -0.6  1.0 -0.9
1936  -2.02  0.91    3   1.7  1.6  1.2  1.1 -0.9  0.7  1.5  1.8  1.9  1.1 -0.9  0.2
1935  -2.56  0.54    3  -0.9 -0.5  1.8  0.8  0.7 -0.5  0.2  0.3 -0.5  1.0  3.8  0.4
1934  -2.12 -0.44    3  -0.4 -1.1 -2.2  0.5  0.3 -0.8 -1.0  2.0  0.0 -1.0 -2.4  0.7
1933  -1.81 -0.31    2  -0.4  2.2 -1.5 -1.7 -0.4  1.5 -0.6 -1.1  0.2  0.5 -1.4 -0.9
1932  -2.55  0.74    2   2.3 -1.3  2.0 -0.6  2.2  0.6  0.0 -0.1  0.1  0.8  3.3 -0.5
1931  -1.46 -1.09    2  -2.2  1.2 -0.2 -0.2 -2.0 -2.8 -0.3 -0.7 -3.1 -0.9 -3.7  1.9
1930  -1.81  0.35    2  -0.6 -1.0  0.5  0.4 -1.6  2.2  2.3 -0.6  4.1  0.0 -0.3 -1.0
1929  -1.12 -0.69    2   1.8  1.9 -2.2 -2.8  1.8  0.4 -0.7 -2.2 -4.0 -0.8 -1.0 -0.3
1928  -1.96  0.83    2   0.2 -0.5  2.0  5.3  0.8 -1.5 -0.4  1.7  0.9 -0.1  2.0 -0.3
1927  -1.81 -0.14    3   0.2 -0.9  0.4 -2.5  1.0  1.1 -0.6  1.0 -0.2 -0.3 -1.2  0.3
1926  -2.48  0.67    3   1.5  2.6 -0.3  1.0 -2.4 -0.6  3.0 -0.3  3.1  1.1  0.5 -1.3
1925  -1.46 -1.02    3  -2.6 -2.4 -0.8  0.1 -1.5 -1.5 -4.7 -0.5 -3.0  1.5  2.4  0.7
1924  -2.19  0.73    3   1.4  0.4  0.2 -0.9  2.0  1.7  2.6  0.5  2.1 -1.2 -0.8  0.6
1923  -1.99 -0.20    2  -2.7 -0.4  1.0  0.2  0.1 -1.2  2.2 -0.6 -1.8 -0.8  0.9  0.6
1922  -1.99  0.00    2   0.5  2.1  1.2  1.2 -2.2 -0.6 -2.3  0.7  1.2  1.2 -0.8 -2.2
1921  -2.28  0.29    3  -0.2 -1.7 -0.3  1.7  2.4  1.3  0.7  0.3 -0.2 -1.4 -0.1  0.9
1920  -1.26 -1.03    3   0.7  1.9 -1.4 -2.6 -2.3 -2.8 -2.6 -2.2 -0.9 -0.1 -0.1  0.1
1919  -1.95  0.70    3  -0.4  1.4  1.9  0.0  1.3  0.8  2.5  2.1 -1.1  0.1 -0.3 -0.0
1918  -2.56  0.61    3   2.2  0.1  0.1  0.8  2.1  3.0 -2.8  0.0  1.3  0.5 -0.1  0.1
1917  -1.51 -1.06    3  -2.7 -2.7 -1.7  0.3 -2.9 -3.4  3.6 -2.2 -2.0  0.4  1.6 -0.8
1916  -1.61  0.10    3   2.4  0.9 -0.7 -0.6  1.0 -0.5 -1.9  2.2  3.3 -0.4 -3.6 -0.9
1915  -0.91 -0.69    3  -1.0 -1.7 -0.5 -1.2 -0.3  1.7 -0.6 -3.4 -3.6 -2.3  2.8  1.8
1914  -1.82  0.91    3  -0.4 -0.1  1.5  0.2  1.5  1.8 -0.6  2.5  3.0  2.4 -1.0  0.2
1913  -1.52 -0.30    3  -1.8  0.5  0.3  0.7 -2.5 -0.1  2.0 -0.7 -0.5 -1.1  0.5 -0.9
1912  -1.48 -0.04    3   1.0 -0.1 -1.3 -0.4  0.5  0.1 -0.3  0.8 -0.4  0.2 -1.0  0.4
1911  -1.56  0.07    3  -0.6 -0.4  1.3 -0.5  0.3 -0.7  0.6 -0.6 -1.5  1.1  1.3  0.6
1910  -2.35  0.79    3   2.5  0.8 -0.8  2.5  1.2 -0.6  0.1  1.8  1.4  0.2  0.9 -0.6
1909  -2.61  0.27    3  -1.6  1.5  1.9 -1.0 -0.8  1.8  0.9  0.2  1.7  0.1 -1.9  0.4
1908  -1.93 -0.68    3   0.3 -1.9 -0.1 -0.5 -0.1 -1.1 -2.0 -1.5 -1.1 -1.0  1.5 -0.7
1907  -1.09 -0.85    3  -0.7 -0.6 -2.2 -2.8 -1.1 -2.3 -0.6 -0.4  1.8 -0.1 -0.7 -0.3
1906  -1.64  0.55    3   0.3  0.9 -0.2  1.2  0.0  1.7  1.4  0.3  0.4  1.1  0.4 -0.9
1905  -1.92  0.28    3   0.1  0.9  0.5  1.6  0.6  0.1 -0.4 -0.2 -1.5  0.8 -0.3  1.3
1904  -1.71 -0.20    2   0.0 -0.9 -0.3 -0.6 -0.6 -1.5  0.4  0.2  0.9 -1.5  0.6  1.1
1903  -2.34  0.63    2   2.6  2.2  0.2  0.9  1.4  0.9 -0.2 -0.4 -0.8  0.8  0.3 -0.5
1902  -2.35  0.01    2  -1.6  0.4  3.0 -0.1 -0.6  0.8  1.4  2.2 -0.6 -0.8 -2.2 -1.9
1901  -2.13 -0.21    2   0.2 -2.3  0.1  0.2  0.5 -1.1  0.4 -0.1  1.2 -1.4  0.7 -0.9
1900  -3.18  1.04    1   3.4  4.0 -0.3  0.0  0.9  2.4 -0.9 -0.3 -2.8  3.6 -0.3  2.8
1899  -3.18  0.01    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0 -0.9  1.2 -0.2
1898  -3.18  0.00    1   0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0
 
For Country Code 5019431
 
From input file ./data/v2.mean.inv11.M.dt

Suddenly it’s a fairly deep and much more smooth “Global Warming”.

High Ho The Dairy-O A Splicing We Will Go…

This really needs a more complete treatment, like that Boballab did for Costa Rica, looking at each of these 7 stations and how the “blend” interacts. But what it looks like to me is a simple case of: “It’s a Bad Idea to Splice Data Sets” even at the individual station level and down to the “Duplicate Number” of processing at the same station.

FWIW, here are the GHCN actual temperature data for Marble Bar:

[chiefio@Hummer 2010]$ inin "MARBLE BAR"
50194315000 MARBLE BAR                     -21.17  119.75  189  239R   -9HIDEno-9x-9SAND DESERT     A    0
[chiefio@Hummer 2010]$ grepmean ^50194315000
5019431500001901-9999  305  295  276  233  183  168  192  249  280  333  345
5019431500001902  315  310  326  279  230  194  189  217  249  276  316  327
5019431500001903  344  332  326  278  243  204  187  213  240  282  312  318
5019431500001904  344  326  321  282  232  187  184  215  247  265  323  333
5019431500001905  342  334  328  301  239  186  187  214  230  279  317  346
5019431500001906  344  344  329  317  244  213  200  216  231  293  324  333
5019431500001907  332  331  302  282  234  192  196  217  249  298  317  342
5019431500001908  351  322  309  285  231  183  175  200  236  278  330  323
5019431500001909  322  338  330  272  227  197  189  199  258  281  308  331
5019431500001910  356  339  315  297  239  196  187  224  279  290  320  322
5019431500001911  341  333  337  293  241  184  191  218  260  295  334  333
5019431500001912  356  337  315  292  246  186  186  221  256  303  325  340
5019431500001913  333  345  315  290  215  182  209  216  243  285  328  332
5019431500001914  327  346  340  301  236  205  200  237  273  316  316  330
5019431500001915  320  323  330  286  234  219  196  202  242  288  345  352
5019431500001916  353  338  318  277  247  222  180  229  271  283  305  343
5019431500001917  312  308  307  273  215  188  216  203  256  292  319  330
5019431500001918  336  304  307  290  241  211  186  206  270  303  330  336
5019431500001919  348  329  331  294  248  216  203  228  252  302  327  334
5019431500001920  348  348  315  257  229  194  186  208  244  294  319  332
5019431500001921  351  318  303  282  255  203  191  208  244  281  326  350
5019431500001922  354  342  320  293  235  199  171  217  260  295  321  328
5019431500001923  326  338  327  293  235  190  190  210  242  284  331  334
5019431500001924  350  350  333  283  260  212  223  216  262  271  314  343
5019431500001925  318  315  315  281  247  197  168  208  230  288  337  350
5019431500001926  337  346  314  296  220  190  204  215  269  299  344  335
5019431500001927  336  326  316  268  228  205  193  226  265  295  324  339
5019431500001928  337  325  342  319  235  192  188  245  273  293  344  328
5019431500001929  357  344  307  285  255  190  174  219  231  282  330  330
5019431500001930  350  335  320  290  237  217  200  211  272  281  330  320
5019431500001931  327  344  317  287  213  184  198  208  243  278  293  343
5019431500001932  345  333  339  276  230  198  200  207  246  283  331  337
5019431500001933  352  352  319  267  231  207  192  194  243  289  314  327
5019431500001934  336  333  292  270  231  193  188  214  244  272  290  340
5019431500001935  325  330  313  277  235  184  184  212  233  285  341  347
5019431500001936  348  353  334  291  231  194  205  239  265  299  329  350
5019431500001937  318  335  332  274  256  203  178  207  249  298  341  335
5019431500001938  331  327  342  297  253  208  186  218  275  317  340  348
5019431500001939  320  326  319  289  247  186  169  199  249  284  315  343
5019431500001940  315  333  327  281  223  209  200  224  272  309  325  346
5019431500001941  344  349  303  307  249  197  219  211  263  279  318  342
5019431500001942  304  308  300  276  245  201  195  223  259  285  308  319
5019431500001943  341  306  317  282  220  192  187  204  244  289  299  339
5019431500001944  348  345  338  294  238  202  191  227  288  301  332  333
5019431500001945  344  347  315  296  244  209  195  233  246  276  325  332
5019431500001946  336  308  308  260  245  196  198  229  245  291  297  345
5019431500001947  347  322  297  284  245  219  209  210  237  264  320  324
5019431500001948  324  318  296  271  231  189  187  205  246  290  305  330
5019431500001949  334  291  308  261  218  184  189  225  240  272  301  334
5019431500001950  339  332  322  278  239  181  175  209  255  272  317  335
5019431500001951  333  331  333  301  230  208  189  200  254  283  344  336
5019431500001952  334  344  321  297  228  194  192  203  259  283  313  329
5019431500001953  345  331  340  289  226  204  202  191  239  285  315  342
5019431500001954  341  337  341  274  247  194  194  219  262  295  316  340
5019431500001955  323  328  319  287  222  185  185  215  262  266  308  328
5019431500001956  337  327  298  289  214  197  177  211  245  278  316  338
5019431500001957  349  319  324  304  247  212  179  208  266  299  336  324
5019431500001958  323  342  317  308  265  218  180  209  236  267  318  337
5019431500001959  349  343  342  301  230  205-9999-9999  268  300  339  337
5019431500001960  331  308  322  289  216  202  200  210  243  303  319  337
5019431500001961  332  308  314  290  227  197  177  203  261  314  329  351
5019431500001962-9999-9999  324  287  230  220  188  201  248  276  313  344
5019431500001963  318  301  321  278  234  188  193  202  253  295  319  330
5019431500001964  339  336  327  291  230  207  192  217  262  269  302  330
5019431500001965  340  348  304  285  251  220  187  220  258  293  324  345
5019431500001966  338  317  318  283  216  200  188  199  228  272  298  316
5019431500001967  315  307-9999  289  247  191-9999  204  248  308  328  326
5019431500001968-9999  326  304  282  212  210-9999  186  239  285  318  327
5019431500001969  343  311  314  279  242  189  197  214  238  301  329  342
5019431500001970  357  333  330  293  226  216  199  214  235  304  311  333
5019431500001971  330  322  324  280  234  190  185  207  251  283  292  336
5019431500001972  330  327  320  284  242  216  199  212  267-9999  335  351
5019431500001973  323  342  327  298  245  202  229  226  247  293  324  336
5019431500001974  312  323  319  265  229  198  204  229  258  283  307  328
5019431500001975  340  318  319  292  247  204  210  212  264  264  318  316
5019431500001976  320  322  294  278  231  199  195  217  245  268  293  347
5019431500001977  346  348  317  284  231  200  197  225  239  305  325  337
5019431500001978  337  315  322  289  222  190  174  207  226  287  314  321
5019431500001979  347  329  319  296  219  211  192  218  247  293  338  340
5019431500001980  328  305  334  273  248  214  193  227  281  277  316  346
5019431500001981  335  305  308  306  241  199  191  224  273  302  297  337
5019431500001982  319  311  299  280-9999  194  197  224  260  294  324-9999
5019431500001983-9999  340  317  258  232  208  186  224  271  295  320  329
5019431500001984  328  338  296  283  252  205-9999  211  240  307  329  326
5019431500001985  352  330  326-9999-9999  205  198  226  262  282-9999  343
5019431500001986  330  337  343  304  247-9999  174  200  249  269  330  351
5019431500001987  331  308  316  305  236  219  210  219  260  291-9999  337
5019431500001988  347  328  322  290  233  215  212  215  259  322  316  316
5019431500001989  336  336  309  287  245  189  195  213  268  301  323  348
5019431500001990  334  326  331  302  249  213  199  231  262  300  356  347
5019431500001991  354  341  337  302  251  220  209  231  256  328  310  346
5019431500001992  339  340  329  298-9999  231  219  211  246  286-9999-9999
[chiefio@Hummer 2010]$ 

The “-9999” are “missing data flags”.

Postscript

Well, this has been fun. I hope folks enjoyed watching the posting be built “real time”. It was somewhat interesting, yet a small stress, to be putting things up “as discovered” and without a lot of “checking time” before hitting that “post” button. (Don’t know that I’ll do a lot of it in the future ;-)

On the other hand, you got to see how things progressed from “idea” to “early findings” to “with reports” to “with some graphs and pictures” and eventually on to “with more pictures, complete graphs, and conclusions along with comparison to GISS anomaly maps”. Hopefully that gives a bit of an idea how much work can go into making a finished product of a posting…

Unless there is a request, I’ll be deleting the “anomaly reports” above about Tuesday California time as the same data are now in the graphs. I’ll leave up the actual Marble Bar temperatures as there was a request for them.

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About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
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18 Responses to Mysterious Marble Bar

  1. Pingback: TWAWKI » Censorship – in science and governments

  2. FijiDave says:

    The Port Hedland co-ordinates take you to a place called Pardoo, 102 kilometres away.

    REPLY: [ The meta data in GHCN are not always the greatest… but I’d expect the name is more accurate indicator. You might want to check DMS vs decimal degrees… Putting it in “Google Maps” as 20 10″ S 119 57″ E gives Port Hedland. Thought the port proper as the Airport is a ways outside of town near the rail line. So I’d expect it’s DMS but with a bit of error from someone picking a place off a map rather than using the actual airport location … -E.M.Smith ]

  3. Ausie Dan says:

    Hi there – that’s very interesting.

    I am working through Australian data and am finding a different set of circumstances, but also leading to another hockey stick, this time pivoted on the year 1975.

    Thsi is slow work as I have other things I must attend to.
    I will make a detailed post when I can.

    My tentative conclusion from what I have seen so far:
    – no real warming in Australia for 100 years.
    – much UHI, causing aparent warming.
    – hockey stick caused by “value adding”, use of anomolies rather than absolutes and data selection – all of which I can model simply.

    All good fun.

  4. E.M.Smith says:

    @Aussie Dan

    Yeah, I’ve seen a 1990 “Pivot” and a 1980 “Lift” but also a “something” in the 1970s in different places. It does look like it is ‘sort of mid decade” but I’ve not narrowed it down yet. It shows up a little bit in the “hair graphs” as a tangle or lowered volatility, but not a full on bulls eye as in the ’90s. Ive not mentioned it as much for two simple reasons. It is ‘weaker” in the places I first started to look at (USA / Europe) and it isn’t as easy to spot in the graphs with dT/dt (so I probably need a different tool tuned for it).

    FWIW, there are a couple of stellar examples of the “70s” thing in Africa. See Morocco for example.

    When you get something ready to go, put up a link (or if you need a place to put it up, let me know and we’ll work out a posting.).

    At all:

    I’ve added graphs. If you are just skipping over the top to read the comments, go back and look at the graphs.

  5. Cement a friend says:

    Hi Chiefio,
    You may know that BOM has original data here http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/data/weather-data.shtml
    The stations named Marble Bar are a bit confusing.
    There is one numbered 004106 at 21 36S, 118.88 E listed as 91.9km away and another with the same number listed 0.6 km away at 21 17S, 119 75 E. Looking at the data it seems they are the same and the station commenced in the year 2000 (I presume it is the Marble Bar airstrip).
    Then looking at closed station there is one called Marble Bar Comparison with a number of 004020 (21 18S, 119 75E elevation 182m). This station was opened in 1895 and closed in 2006. I presume that would be in town at the post office. (Around Australia there were a huge number of stations opened in the period 1892 to 1900 all operated officially by post offices- these have all been closed when the PMG Post Master Generals Department was corporatised to Australia Post and Post Offices where either shut or contracted out)
    Any way you can find the monthly average maximums here
    http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/ncc/cdio/weatherData/av?p_nccObsCode=36&p_display_type=dataFile&p_startYear=&p_stn_num=004020
    A quick glance shows the highest monthly temperatures Jan 2005 at 44.6C followed by 44.4C in Jan 1910 & 1922. The highest annual ave. max was 37.1C in 1944 followed by 36.9C in 1924. The range is 33.5C(1978) to 37.1 (1944) with a mean of 35.3. There is no evidence of an increase in recent years. For Station 4106 the mean annual average max. for the years 2001 to 2009 is 35.3 the same as that for station 4020
    You can download the data for max and min in separate csv files.

    I would be interested in your comparison of the actual raw data and the database you have accessed. Maybe the latter contain a hidden adjustments.

  6. Tim Clark says:

    EM

    Biggest infrastructure development at Port Hedland and inland has been by Fortescue metals group limited. Here’s the link.

    Note to investors, I own the stock.

    http://www.fmgl.com.au/IRM/content/project_infrastructure_port.htm

  7. Tim Clark says:

    I guess to be technically correct:

    I own “some” of the stock.

    REPLY: [ What, not all of it? ;-) Trades on the Australian exchange (from the USA in Bigcharts ticker is AU:FMG ) and in the USA on the NQB variation of NASDAQ under FSUMY and in Frankfurt under DE:FVJ and where I presume the “DE” isn’t needed if you are IN Germany… Looks like there might be a preferred listing in Australia as well AU:FMGDA but I’ve not researched the capital structure, just speculating from the symbol. Nice rising trend, looks like a good pick… PE is a touch high at 27, but if it’s growing well…. And with the Aussie Dollar kicking U$ butt, not a bad deal at all for those of us on this side of the lake. Hmmm….. I’ll need to ponder this one some more. Thanks! -E.M.Smith ]

  8. Tim Clark says:

    Link to some pictures at Port Hedland:

    http://www.fmgl.com.au/IRM/content/project_imagegallery_milestones.htm

    REPLY: [ Nicely done image gallery. Love the train shots (grew up ‘near the tracks’ and like hearing trains in the distance… the ‘clicky clack’ will always put me to sleep if I’m stressing… comforting somehow.) You can really sense the growth of industry from the mine to the trains to the port onto the large ships. -E.M.Smith ]

  9. Stephen Brown says:

    Nullagine to Marble Bar is one helluva drive, I can tell you. “Nearby” does NOT apply! The only redeeming feature of both places is that the Swan lager is served icy cold (do NOT ask for a VB!)

    My cousin writes the software which controls the three or four diesel locos which haul the mile-long trains of ore into Port Headland. He’s been there a number of years and if you ask him about the climate his reply is “Bloody hot! Always.”

    When I was driving on the Inland Highway the road was all dirt-track. I wonder if its been tarred over yet?

    REPLY: [ Yeah, I usually put “nearby” in quotes as it bugs me too. But GIStemp will “fill in” a station via “homogenizing” from up to 1000 km away and it will use a station up to 1200 km away to fill in an anomaly “Grid Box”. So, like it or not, in “climate science” we have a definition of a “nearby” station of 1000 to 1200 km away… See Hansen’s papers on “The Reference Station Method”. In San Jose, California, it can be 50 F hotter than in San Francisco, or the same temperature, or 20 F colder (that I know of, maybe more…) and yet it’s only 50 miles away. Sacramento can be 60+ F hotter and near 40 F colder and it’s about 1 hours drive away from San Francisco. Heck, even Lake Tahoe with blizards and skiing is “nearby” in “climate science”. I hate it, but that’s what they do… So these Australian stations are highly likely to be combined and used to fill in the “nearby” grid boxes. And they will be treated as interchangeable and merged, spliced, and blended via The Reference Station Method with abandon. So it’s reasonable to ask what biases might be hiding in this combining that could “leak through” that method. -E.M.Smith ]

  10. Ian Beale says:

    Somewhat o/t

    I was once questioned on the meaning of a quote which went along the lines of:-

    “You can’t scare me with hell-fire” said a new arrival to the devil. “I’m from Marble Bar”.

  11. oldtimer says:

    When scratching around earlier today, trying to get up to speed, I discovered that a Port Hedland is listed in the Global Surface Network (GSN) as follows under Australia (Lat 20-S – 25~S) as:
    Index# Station name Lat Long Elev(m)
    94312 PORT HEDLAND AIRPORT 20 22S 118 38E 9

    The full list of GSNs (c1000) is here:
    http://gosic.org/docs/GSN_Station_Region_Jan09.pdf

    A write up about the GSN selection process is here:
    http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/hofn/gsn/gsnselection.pdf

    Apologies if this is all old hat information. I do note, however, that the write up says that c90+% of the GSNs are in the GHCN station list.

    REPLY: [ Thanks for the pointers! I think it is the same place. The LAT and LONG look like what I remember the Airport as being. (It’s a bit inland and toward the rail road tracks on the Eastern approach to town IIRC the map. As near as I can tell, the GSN’s are a strongly airport biased subset of GHCN in total but very similar to GHCN in 2009 after they dropped a lot of thermometers… but I’ve not proven that perception. -E.M.Smith ]

  12. E.M.Smith says:

    UPDATE: I’m now done adding to the posting. Some new things were just added, so you all may want a re-look. At this point I’m of the opinion that this posting is “done” and will start working on the next one.

    @Ian: I LOVE it!

    My “home town” had regular excursions to 110 F and the odd day or two that hit 114 – 117 F (in the shade, and thar aint no shade!) About 43 to 47 C. Every Summer.

    When I visited Phoenix Arizona I was right at home in about the same temps. One day it hit close to 120 F (not sure which side ;-) but the news on the radio reported the tarmac at the airport was soft and melting so was being temporarily shut down (IIRC they said it was 128 F at that part of the airport… and about 122 F elsewhere). That was a nice warm day… we hit the ‘solar heated pool’ at the hotel and it was warm. Didn’t realize how warm until I jumped in the attached Hot Tub (that must, by law, be kept below 105 F or so) and it was COOLER than the pool! Checked the thermometer. Yup 104 F in the “Hot “Tub ;-)

    I’ll have to remember to say “Hell ain’t nuttin, I’m from a place as hot as Marble Bar!” We even had red dirt in the hills too …

  13. Cement a friend says:

    Chiefio,
    On view the tables for Marble Bar appear truncated but they downloaded OK. If I get time I will make a comparison between the actual raw data and the GHCN data.
    I have had a quick look at the BOM data for 1924 and 1992. It appears in the winter particularly June & August the 1992 mininums are higher than for 1924 but for the maximums the reverse applies. Overall for the years, the average temperate in 1924 (28.5C) is higher than in 1992 (28.2C). I would conclude that the GHCN data has been adjusted to give a higher anomaly in 1992.

    I would suggest that GHCN are not only splicing data but are also applying a UHI adjustment incorrectly to rural sites (ie up for rural instead of down for cities) as has been shown elsewhere eg http://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/02/26/a-new-paper-comparing-ncdc-rural-and-urban-us-surface-temperature-data/

    Further of course there is no need for the splicing. The Marble Bar data is still available. There is an overlap between the old PO station 4020 and the new 4106 station (0.6km away) of six years so that it is possible to pick up any UHI effect difference. I have noted that with a small Queensland town station Gayndah where the PO station 39039 was closed in 2009 while the Airport station was opened in 2003. In the latter case the PO station was 0.2 higher than the airport (2km away)

  14. Tom Harley says:

    Great post.
    The area south of Broome to Exmouth along the coast and inland to various Pilbara mining towns is often regarded as the hottest part of Australia, and covers a very large area. It is affected by a few cyclones each summer, causing temperatures to greatly reduce when rain and cloud from these systems crosses the coast and moves inland, cooling desert regions sometimes all the way to the south coast of Australia, flooding South Australia even.
    Some years, towns here often have few or no cyclones, resulting in consistent hot temperatures above 40 degrees C. This summer is one of those and rainfall has been very limited.
    Here in Broome, closer to Port Hedland than Telfer, the last few months have been above average. However Broome’s long term temperature average over the last 70 or so years measured at the airport is only 0.1C more than the previous 50 years or so at the Post Office, just 1.6 km away.
    Broome’s temp. is milder than all Pilbara towns due to the sea being on 3 sides so that the town is more affected by sea water temperatures. The airport runs across the neck of the peninsular so it may have a smaller UHI than most places. There can be a temperature change just 10 km inland at times up 7 or 8 degrees in summer and down the same in winter.

  15. Keith Hill says:

    chiefio. BoM lists the following co-ordinates for the Port Hedland surface station No.004032 (WMO No.94312)
    20.3725S Lat 118.6317E Long
    4 decimal places – how’s that for exactitude !

    REPLY: [ I Like It! Now if you can just talk NASA / GISS and NOAA / NCDC into doing it… -E.M.Smith ]

  16. sky says:

    Since getting the monthly mean MAX and MIN series for Marble Bar 1901-2006 a few days ago from Mike Jonas’ posted link on the “Aussie go…” thread, I compiled yearly means of each series to remove the seasonal cycle. The yearly means show a mild declining trend in the MAXes and a slightly stronger rising trend in the MINs. In other words, the diurnal range is shrinking and the yearly mid-range temp is rising very mildly (~.2K per century) overall.

    The curious thing, however, is the abrupt flatenning of the MIN series in the 70’s, while the MAXes were declining, leading to a sharp drop in the diurnal range. This suggests either a shift to stronger marine influence at the station or a change in the measurement process there. In any event, the Marble Bar record is quite enigmatic in its stochastic non-stationarity.

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