Mission Carmel

As part of our missions tour, we visited the mission at Carmel. For all of these pictures, you can click on them to get much larger more detailed images.

Mission at Carmel

Mission at Carmel

Where I just love the garden and flowers.

Blue cone of flowers with a bee at the top

Start at the top and work your way down

There is also a display of the history of the mission, including a collection of tools from the time of the building. Note that in addition to iron and wood, some of these are stone tools.

Mission Carmel Tools Display

Mission Carmel Tools Display

Along with more traditional museum exhibits and some very interesting statuary.

Mission Carmel Museum Statue

Mission Carmel Museum Statue

The actual burial place of Fr. Serra is a bit more modest:

Fra Juniper Serra final resting place at Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo

Fra Juniper Serra final resting place at Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo

Known as Fray Junipero Serra in Spanish, he was a native speaker of Catalan. It was his efforts that brought the missions to California. Monterey was the capital of California (and related territories) then under Spain. The dining room has a plaque stating that ships captains and governors would often dine there along with other notables. You will note his resting place in this picture in the lower left. The governor only rated a small place out of the frame to the right in the foreground paving stone area…

Mission at Carmel, Altar

Mission at Carmel, Altar

Mission at Carmel, toward the entrance

Mission at Carmel, toward the entrance

While we were there, a gaggle of Jags showed up in the courtyard:

Gaggle of Jags at Carmel

Gaggle of Jags at Carmel

And I took far too many photographs… so those will need to go in a different posting. Just note that it was something of a media event:

Jaguar media event at the Mission at Carmel

Jaguar media event at the Mission at Carmel

Inside, I found this “Two burner stove with oven” fascinating. That’s one large pot you can heat on that simple burner…

Two burner stove with oven made of mud and bricks

Two burner stove with oven made of mud and bricks

I have a load of photos from this mission alone, so I may do additional postings on some parts of it. For now, just a bit more from the garden. Despite the technical flaw of a bit of flare / washout toward the bottom (the lighting was a challenge) I really like the contrast of colors in this picture:

Red Foliage Yellow Flower

Red Foliage Yellow Flower

And yes, I have a ‘thing’ for red and purple foliage… and as a study in textures, I liked what they did with the small plants between a couple of rocks.

Rocks and Greens texture

Rocks and Greens texture

I just love a wooly wet plant…

Wooly Wet Leafy

Wooly Wet Leafy

When we left, we stopped at the beach in Carmel. There was something about this tree that just shouted “Free Spirit!”

Carmel Beach Tree

Carmel Beach Tree

But i was remembering the flowers at the Mission for days…

Mission Carmel yellow / red flowers

Mission Carmel yellow / red flowers

(The usual ‘terms’ apply. You can use these for non-profit purposes (with attribution where appropriate – i.e. no attribution needed in your wallpaper…) and any commercial use, I get a piece of the action. Mostly I just hope folks enjoy them.)

So now you know what I do when I’m not being technical / analytical 8-)

About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
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9 Responses to Mission Carmel

  1. RK says:

    very nice

  2. Tom Bakewell says:

    Sir, I believe those are not just ‘some jags’ They look like D types or XK-SS models. I never knew there were that many loose in the world.

    From one of your happiest fans. You write it, I read it, if only with modest comprehension sometimes

  3. P.G. Sharrow says:

    That yellow flower amid the red leaves is a bird of paradise. pg

  4. E.M.Smith says:

    You may have noticed I’m prone to modest understatement when describing my pictures…

    It was Concourse d’Elegance week

    http://www.pebblebeachconcours.net/

    More exotic and rare cars in one place than you would ever imagine. One Alpha Romeo was a “one of 85”. There were so many cars that I’ve never seen before (and likely will never see again…). There was a row of Ferraris down town, and a Bently or two, some gaggle of Alphas and Porsches along with the odd row of Shelbys. When walking down town I’d left the camera bag in the car, so no pictures of them. But they were parked all over down town.

    The Jags had a special event at the mission. There were two of an older type out front, and some other newer ones not in the group shown in this photo nearby. I overheard one fellow saying he thought this was close to the world population of these cars (some few in museums not making the journey) and I believe he said “D type”. One Jag was from Ecuador… note the English drive and Euro style plate numbers on the front of others. Yeah, not just “any Jags”. After about 1/2 an hour, SWMBO drug me away to go look at the mission some more… But it was clear from the photographers (and the expense of their gear…) that this was a ‘once in a lifetime’ event. These cars, together, in this place.

    There was a lunch set up for the car crowd. When I post the rest of the Jag pictures I’m going to include that picture as well.

    And they DROVE into the mission. Later we saw them driving off to the downtown event. Saw a local cop with red light on behind one stopped by the side of the road. As we pulled up we saw another Jag that had stopped with him pull out. It was clear that the first one was looking at his engine and the cop was looking at the car. No ticket book in sight, just “helping” and trying not to drool in public. There is something special about seeing these guys on the road.

  5. Verity Jones says:

    The perspective on the photo labelled “toward the entrance” is fabulous, as is the lighting.

    The beach tree – ‘free spirit’ yes! Reminds me of the Gary Larson cartoon of Christmas trees doing their best to look mishapen as someone comes along with an axe.

    Love the plants. I know my plants quite well, so whether you wanted to know or not (or perhaps you already do of course), from top you have an Echium, Cotinus (purple leaf) and Strelitzia (Latin name to more common name supplied by P.G.), between the rocks is Soleirolia (Baby’s tears or Mind your own business), unsure of the wet woolly leaf, and Alstroemeria.

    I made the mistake of introducing Soleirolia to our garden, where it has thrived in the damp areas and smothered the very rocks it was supposed to look pretty around. It has covered steps and everything. It is easy to remove but grows back in a season. It dies back to a mushy black mess after frost.

    And oh those curves (on the cars). Mmmm. They don’t make them like that any more!

  6. E.M.Smith says:

    @Verity Jones: Thanks for the names. I’m lousy at them, so it’s nice to know what is what.

    Also, Adrian points out that the Jags are XKSS types in a comment on the other picture posting here:

    https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2010/08/20/some-texture/

    So I guess what I overheard was folks comparing them to D Type. (That’s the problem with overhearing things, not much context…)

  7. Pascvaks says:

    Ref the Kitchen Pic at –

    Have to ask, it appears the two stoves have a square ?vent? at the top, doesn’t that room get pretty smoky? Would think that even being as old as they are the stoves would have vented to the outside. Does the oven have a vent in the back to the outside?

    Questions arise from some articles I read recently about an agency helping poor villages in third world countries with a venting stove. Looks like these in the old mission didn’t vent to the outside either. Little wonder that women tended to die so young, babies and smoke.

  8. Tom Bakewell says:

    That is a stunning collection of Coventry’s best effort.

    I can’t wait for you to post the rest of the photos.

    In my wild and misspent youth I had several of the snorting beasts (XK-150s) I loved their deep throated 6 cylinder song when they were let out to roam.

    Tom Bakewell

  9. E.M.Smith says:

    I saw no outside vent on the stove, though a similar stove at another mission said it was for use with charcoal. That kitchen had an outside door, but could be closed to make it a kind of ‘smoke house’ from the oven vent. This kitchen, IIRC, had an outside window of large size. It could easily have had a vent built in somewhere that I didn’t notice. There was an ‘odd thing’ on the wall opposite. It looked a bit like a tiny fireplace at waist height with a chimney, but with some kind of ceramic or stone cylinder? sitting in it. That might have been a fresh air ‘intake’ as cool air will sink down an adobe hollow in a massive wall. A similar exit above the oven (I saw no hole on top as in the other kitchen / oven, but could not get around to inspect as the room has a fenced entry…) could be the warm ‘draft’ and the whole place would then have been cross ventilated.

    These folks were pretty darned clever. I would expect there is some subtle ‘fix’ built into the place.

    I did not inspect the wall top / bottom on the outside wall, for example. It would be easy to have had some kind of vents built in that looked like a cupboard door when closed.

    Also, the way the oven works is you build a fire to warm all the masonry, then when it dies down, sweep out the ashes and bake in the hot bricks. It could easily be that the ‘method’ is simply to light up the whole load, stove too. Then when it’s burned down, air it out will taking out the ashes, and cook in the clean air of no fire… That much masonry, if all hot, would stay hot for hours. Basically, separation from the smoke in time instead of in space.

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