In a “Willy” mood…

For no real reason other than that I’m “Packing my shit” and in a “Willy mood”:

The Original. Haunting and causes the soul to quiver… :

By “cowboys in suits”; with richness and depth:

With “Picken an a Grinnin”

And Elvis, jus’ foolin aroound…

With a bit of “juice”…

and more modern…

Kind of amazing how a simple song can “mutate” and become a variety of different things over time and over cultural “nuance”…

Then, as it gets “outside”…

We be “bringing it home”….

A long long ways from Burl Ives… yet I can’t say which one I like the most… Each in its own way…

Now, just to add a “political hook” to it all… There is a “Celtic Thread” ™ that runs through America and much of Europe. Yes, we are oppressed by Rome. Still, every so often, we sack Rome… IMHO, music such as this expresses that Celtic Thread. Romans would be well advised to remember that we sack Rome, if you annoy us enough. That we don’t give a damn much of the time ought not to be construed as either stupidity nor as acquiescence… it is simply marginal tolerance. We know what you are “up to”, and we do not agree to it. We just have other more important things we’d rather spend our time and efforts upon. (Like weddings and graduations and parties and all…) But, should you get too far out of line, we can become, if needed, Ghost Riders In The Sky…

You really do not want to see that… We’ve sacked Rome a few times now. We thought maybe you would learn… but if not, we stand prepared to repeat the lessons, as needed.

With that, “once more, with feeling this time”…

Just since I’m going past N’Orleans…

and I’m “of a certain age” where this speaks to me…

As I check out of “Hotel California”…

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About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
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18 Responses to In a “Willy” mood…

  1. Jason Calley says:

    Well, E.M., you have managed to score two out of two when posting songs that most make me shiver — but probably not for the reasons one might hope. Here’s the story. When I was about 12 years old, my older brother, then 16 years old, found himself in the possession of a five string tenor banjo. Having purchased the blasted thing from the local pawn shop, he proceeded to teach himself to play. The first two songs he learned (and the last two, as well) were “Ghost Riders in the Sky” and “House of the Rising Sun.” He played them moderately well. Endlessly. Eternally and co-eternally, with an earnest passion that only a 16 year old possesses. He played fast, slow, note by note, slide style, but always repeatedly. Our shared bedroom became a place of continuous Ghostriding and Rising Suns. Over and over. And over. And over. And over.

    I thought that I would go insane. Perhaps I did.

    The only thing that saved me were the sporadic periods when he would be so hard up for cash that he would take the darned banjo back to the pawn shop to exchange it for a cash infusion. I would have a week or two of peace, and then he would redeem the evil instrument and I would be plunged once more into five string hell.

    I cannot hear either song today without a shiver. Not a good shiver. A very pronounced and painful shiver.

  2. E.M.Smith says:

    Well, OK, then skip on to the next posting… Unless raised 1/2 Hispanic you ought hot to shiver at all …

    ;-)

  3. John F. Hultquist says:

    Post prompted me to read about ‘Riders’ and its writer, Stan Jones – both have short wiki entries.

    “Jones said that he had been told the story when he was 12 years old by an old cowboy friend. The story resembles the northern European mythic Wild Hunt.” (from the song entry on wiki)

    The ‘Wild Hunt’ wiki post starts: “The Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe.”

    Fancy that! Good traveling. Stop in TX for some slow smoked ribs.
    Best, John.

  4. jradig says:

    A few more versions of Riders in the Sky:
    The first I ever heard, in very dramatic fashion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAbtX9xpTjY&feature=PlayList&p=1FDE1F0A427CFEAE&playnext_from=PL&playnext=1&index=14
    A version by an 80’s icon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dt0mJDzTbyo

    Finally, what I think is the most unusual treatment, by Scatman Crothers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6nU-h3pLQU (check the link while it’s there, one that was posted previously has disappered)

  5. Zeke says:

    “Romans would be well advised to remember that we sack Rome, if you annoy us enough. That we don’t give a damn much of the time ought not to be construed as either stupidity nor as acquiescence… it is simply marginal tolerance. We know what you are “up to”, and we do not agree to it. We just have other more important things we’d rather spend our time and efforts upon. (Like weddings and graduations and parties and all…)”

    According to Plato, the purpose of the state is to prevent change. The mobility and change of the democratic, open society was to him the source of all evil and tumult; his ideal was the separation of the classes so that the aristocracy was preserved and the authority of the philosopher king was upheld. The aristocracy is allowed to have weapons, chariots, art, land, and palaces. The rest of the people are bred and managed in order to serve the aristocracy.

    But there were other people who did not arrange their societies in this way. These other cultures did possess conjugial love, strong families, upward mobility, a merchant class that produced wealth rather than concentrating it on a few degenerate and powerful families, and there was private ownership of land. I am describing the Etruscans right now, but there were others who appear to have had developed less rigid societies. However, these were invaded by the Romans, subjugated, and all of their writing and histories were destroyed. The Celts, the Etruscans, the Thraceans, the Phrygians, the Lydians – these conquered people of Rome and their literature are reduced to nothing but inscriptions. I believe that their writings were taken, altered, and published by Greek and Roman authors, and it is time to cause the Roman Empire to disgorge what it has ruthlessly devoured and trampled to residue. It may be possible to restore the genuine history and identity of many ancient people, and to reclaim history so that civilisation itself is no longer defined as the presence of a ruthless and degenerate Aristocracy that enslaves all others in service of their palaces. That is not our true history.

  6. adolfogiurfa says:

    @Zeke: There is a difference between aristocracy and kleptocracy….The ideal aristocracy is that of the heart not of the wallet.

  7. adolfogiurfa says:

    …Then, during the golden age, we had the distinctive instinct to discriminate properly, the conscience to recognize and respect a superior level of being and such respected beings did not ask for any power over us other than just to hopefully follow their example without any obligation at all.
    Now, and from a long time ago, the world it is up side down, like the Tarot´s “Hang man”, the vilest and most corrupt and stupid at the top: The “winners”, those lenders at the Temple whipped away by Jesus.

  8. Zeke says:

    Speaking of empires, what is the difference between “United Nations” and World Empire?

    When you see your economies being subjugated, your traditions, language, and culture being systematically removed, your children becoming property of the state, and populations being removed from their lands or large groups of other people being placed in your land deliberately, there are some signs that you are falling under Empire.

  9. Zeke says:

    adolfogiurfa says:
    29 May 2013 at 5:57 pm “…Then, during the golden age, we had the distinctive instinct to discriminate properly…”

    What do we know about the Golden Age? What are the descriptions of that mythical time which would allow us to qualify and describe what physical and spiritual conditions existed? Once again, this myth is reduced to a few Greek and Roman sources – known world powers with a vested interest in retelling the past.

    It is easy for modern comparative mythologists to select a few details about the Golden Age and ignore others. For example, the legends of the Golden Age seem to testify of extraordinarily long lifespans, and also it always ends in cataclysm because of a terrible corruption and violence. So whatever the state of the Golden Age was, it was not incorruptible. What made the Golden Age Golden? This is an open question, with many missing pieces. Without standards, comparative mythologists cannot resist confirming their own ideologies and Roman historians.

  10. Zeke says:

    And it is customary for World Empires to demand Tribute of its vassal states, while destroying and remaking their economies to weaken them, keep them subject, and yet provide what is needed to the ruthless, perverted Aristocracy.

    America’s Real Contribution to U.N. Is Unknown

    How much money does the United States currently contribute to the United Nations and its various agencies? Surprisingly, no one knows for sure.

    The State Department does report on its spending at the United Nations, but it is only one of several federal agencies that give money to the world body each year.

    In its fiscal 2014 State and Foreign Operations budget proposal released in April, the Obama administration asked for $1.57 billion for contributions to international organizations, including $617.6 million for the U.N. operating budget — up from $568.8 million in fiscal 2012. But other agencies giving to the U.N. include the Departments of Labor, Energy, Agriculture, Defense, and Health and Human Services, CNS News reported.

    Fiscal 2007 legislation stipulated that the Office of Budget and Management (OMB) report all federal agencies’ contributions, but the requirement expired in 2011.

    Now Republican Sens. Mike Enzi of Wyoming and Mike Lee of Utah, and others, are submitting legislation that would reinstate the requirement”

  11. adolfogiurfa says:

    @Zeke: Have you heard of scalar waves transmission? (N.Tesla patent #645,576 March 20,1900), it is a quite simple resonant spiral which can be made nano-sized:

  12. philjourdan says:

    I am fortunate enough not to have to remember the 2 songs as Jason did with a shiver of pain. I remember them both fondly, but for different reasons.

    The melody of Ghost Riders is probably one of the most popular for westerns. Those shows that were always on TV when we were kids. No matter what else was on, there was the Rifleman or Maverick in black and white, when good triumphed in the end. Simple times. Times that probably never really existed except in the minds of small boys 50 years ago.

    And House of the Rising sun came about as that young boy was entering the teen years. It was a warning ballad (that and what I saw happened to my sister). So yes, I remember both fondly. They take me back to times when it was easy to fix what was wrong. And what was wrong was not much.

    Oh, and the best version is still the Willie and Johnny version.

  13. Given that I don’t have a musical bone in my body my opinion is probably of little value. However I still love Tom Lehrer and Flander & Swann. Here is a snip reminding us that there was “Extreme Weather” fifty years ago (at least in England). Then they sing about the “Reluctant Cannibal” and “Interior Decor”.

    Here are some of my favorites. The “London Omnibus”, the “Gnu Song”, the “Weather Song” (again), the “Hippopotamus Song”, the “Gasman Song” and “My French Horn”.

    My personal favorite is “Misalliance” with its important political message. I could not find the original on “Youtube” so here is James France:

  14. Zeke says:

    @Adolfo: Instead of watching the video with the panel I am reading Tesla’s patent 645,576. Thank you as always.
    http://www.teslauniverse.com/nikola-tesla-patents-645,576-transmission-of-energy

  15. Zeke says: 29 May 2013 at 5:58 pm
    “When you see your economies being subjugated, your traditions, language, and culture being systematically removed, your children becoming property of the state, and populations being removed from their lands or large groups of other people being placed in your land deliberately, there are some signs that you are falling under Empire.”

    Great nations rise owing to the merit of their institutions and they fall when those institutions become corrupt. If you doubt this I ask you to read “Why Nations Fail” by Acemoglu and Robinson. The authors see a contrast between “Extractive” and “Inclusive” institutions.

  16. Steve C says:

    Zeke says (29 May, 5:58 pm):
    “When you see your economies being subjugated, your traditions, language, and culture being systematically removed, your children becoming property of the state, and populations being removed from their lands or large groups of other people being placed in your land deliberately, there are some signs that you are falling under Empire.”

    Check … check … check … check … Well, that’s about it for the UK, then. Evidently, having had an Empire yourself doesn’t inoculate you. Be warned, America!

    Never been much of a one for C&W myself, despite a (London-based!) friend trying to persuade me some years back that “all life in in those songs, Steve”. I’d guess that at least some of its popularity in the USA comes from its being “home-grown”, though I still don’t really understand its appeal in London. Jazz, OTOH, has travelled very well from its Stateside roots into my sitting room, be it Trad or some of the more modern experimental stuff.

    Mostly, though … “classical”, using the word in its all-inclusive sense rather than specifically to point to (approximately) Beethoven’s time. With a thousand years’ worth of music to choose from, there’s always something to enthrall, from meditative plainchant to vast, richly layered orchestral pieces. Saint Johann Sebastian (Bach), for instance, can have you on the verge of tears one minute, yet practically shouting with laughter the next, as the ensemble launches into a cheeky little riff that just dances with joy.

    Plus, as a hardcore Big Music enthusiast, I’ve already enjoyed one live performance of Wagner’s “Ring Cycle” (from the NY Met) this year, and am greatly looking forward to hearing Daniel Barenboim conducting another at the BBC Promenade Concerts this summer. A “week of evenings” absorbing the Ring always leaves me completely spaced out for a couple of days or so before the effect wears off, if indeed it ever does. As the man himself wrote, “Mark well my poem. It contains the world’s beginning, and its end.” And how.

    Not very good as road music, of course. Well, okay, if you’re already one of the world’s top Heldentenors you might be able to sing along here and there …

  17. Zeke says:

    Why Nations Fail looks like a really great book gallopingcamel.

  18. BobN says:

    Ghost Riders – first song I learned on the guitar.
    Best version – Duane Eddy

    House of the Rising Sun – A real Belt Buckle Polisher in its day!

    Great Music EM

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