W.O.O.D. – 24 December 2019 – The Christmas / Solstice WOOD

We’re just a tiny bit past the Winter Solstice about to touch Christmas. The reason these (almost) coincide is the same reason Easter falls on an approximation of the Spring Equinox. The Ancient religions celebrated the cycles of the Sun, the Moon, and the Earth. When Christianity came along, it found easier acceptance if they planted a Holy Day right on top of the exiting Holi-Day. Then, over a 1000+ years the calenders tend to drift a bit from the Stars… so it’s an Almost.

The day length in the Northern Hemisphere is just past the shortest it will be, from here on out, days get longer and nights shorter (and exactly the opposite in the Southern Hemisphere). Yet the brunt of Winter is still in front of us. There’s a time lag of about 3 months between when the solar input changes and when the result is finally able to move the masses of air, water and dirt to warmer (or colder). So the top few meters of ocean and soil have been giving up heat for a few months now, but still need to cool some more before they catch up with the loss of insolation. In another month or three these catch up, only to find the sun running to hotter and they must change direction and try to catch up, again, but to the warming side. Thus “February is the cruellest month”. Days are getting longer, it ought to be warming, but it isn’t warm yet… But that is still a couple of months away.

For now, we’ve got a long run of holiday time ahead of us. Christmas, New Years. Congress not in session (Hip Hip Hooray!)

Enjoy ’em if you got ’em!

Intro

This is another of the W.O.O.D. series of semi-regular
Weekly Occasional Open Discussions.
(i.e. if I forget and skip one, no big)

Immediate prior one here:

https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2019/12/18/w-o-o-d-18-december-2019-the-impeachment-party-wood/
and remains open for threads running there (at least until the ‘several month’ auto-close of comments on stale threads).

Canonical list of old ones here:
https://chiefio.wordpress.com/category/w-o-o-d/

For just general FYI notices, use to “tips” pages. All the old ones remain for historical reference:
Tips Pages

What’s Going On?

BREXIT

Boris won. His Parliament is behind him. They past a law saying basically “Its On! No More Extensions.”

So now it’s January 2021 – “This time for Sure!”. But will it be BINO? Brexit In Name Only?

At present the law passed is an act of parliament to make an agreement to negotiate a “deal” on trade. Weak tea, but the best we’ve seen so far.

IF this space stays dull for the next few weeks I’ll likely drop this section until / unless something actually happens.

Impeachment Circus, Sort Of

The Dims voted for Articles. One of them is now a SCOTUS case (the “obstruction” for asking the court to decide) so mooted on the face of it. The other, “abuse of power” is laughable. Ukraine was a Democratic Money Laundry for $Billions, a conduit for “Foreign Aid” money to be laundered into the pockets of Democrats like Biden. Trump held up more aid until he could assure the new President of Ukraine was actually going to stop corruption, then let the aid flow. There is a treaty between the two countries that we are supposed to help each other investigate crimes.

In essence, Trump is being Impeached for doing his job and stopping the Democrat / Soros driven corrupt money laundry.

But Pelosi is sitting on the Articles. Until they are transmitted to the Senate, Trump is not impeached. So Pelosi is trying to use this as leverage to get the Senate to do things Her Way. Fat chance. Her leverage amounts to “Give me concessions or I will NOT impeach the POTUS and NOT disrupt the Senate with an impeachment trial”! Or perhaps she has had a bit of a think (or been “consulted” with a money stick) to understand that if she now just doesn’t send ’em over, nobody calls Biden & Son or Soros to a Senate trial and the Dims in Trump States can claim that “yes, they voted for it, but nothing came of it”? With this crowd of corruption and deception, any game is possible.

POTUS has now signed a temporary funding bill, but it included some “gifts” to the Democrats; in particular a statement that no more aid would or could be put on hold by the POTUS. They are trying to spin this as stopping Trump from using it for blackmail when in fact the purpose is to keep the money laundry funded and running. I say “Hey, Barr! FOLLOW THE MONEY!”. I want to see Perp Walks in January.

I’m leaving other political news of the world blank for now as typically it all takes a break for Christmas. Only exception is that the Yellow Vests in France said they will keep protesting. I suspect it will be more wine and cheese than bricks and tear gas when protesting over the holidays… but “we’ll see”.

Snow Season & Food Prices / Prepping

It’s here. We’re getting lots and lots of snow all over the planet. Lots of records falling. Washington State (and some of Oregon) being whacked with a Pineapple Express “Aerial River” so record rain.

After the wet spring last year, and then the early rain and snow this year, causing a lot of crop losses; I’m expecting the same thing this coming year. LOTS of rain and snow leading to a late start to planting season, and another early onset of winter in 2020. Cattle culling is happening now as herd sizes are reduced; so beef will stay reasonably priced until that ends. Figure about 2 months more, maybe. African Swine Fever has already killed about 1/4 of the swine on the planet and is just now knocking on the door of Australia. Putting a couple of canned hams or cans of Corned Beef in the pantry and a few pounds of bacon in the freezer is not a bad idea. China is busy buying meat and grain anywhere it can get it. This will only get worse.

If you do not have some degree of strategic food reserve (i.e. a Prepper Pantry), do so while you can still do it relatively cheaply. There’s lots of low cost options for putting some food by without a lot of effort or cost. Just a simple thing like buying double your usual buy for anything that keeps well and putting the extra in a closet. Canned goods, tuna, peanut butter, boxed dry meals like Mac N Cheese or Potatoes Au Gratin, jam & preserves, spam or canned ham or canned corned beef, breakfast bars or fig newtons. Have some “staples” extra too. Salt, Sugar, Pepper & Spices. A 20 pound bag of white rice was selling for $10 today. Add a 20 pound bag of beans for a little more and you have “beans and rice” for a month for 2, or longer if used as sides to things like that canned ham.

If you buy things you regularly eat, the money isn’t wasted and isn’t going into a pile of freeze dried diced Whatzits or hard winter wheat berries that you will never eat. If you like tuna sandwiches, buy extra tuna and a couple of boxes of crackers. Tuna and crackers store well. Tuna, peas and a box of Mac N Cheese makes a great casserole and the whole lot stores well. The mix does want butter and milk, but you can substitute olive oil or coconut oil and canned or powdered milk. Doing this, you can have a 6 month “food supply” in about 6 months without breaking the budget or working at it too hard. Plus, it’s stuff you already eat.

The bad weather this year is not going to have a major impact on prices, but will have an impact. The big hit will come next year. That’s when the inventory from this year runs short. Shortages of seeds (seed potatoes took a big hit this year as did the valley that grows most of our vegetable seeds) and another year of bad weather will leave a mark on food prices and availability. That’s not the time to want to be buying extra. Do it now. The worst that happens is you learn some new food storage skills and don’t have to buy beans and rice again for a year ;-)

It isn’t (yet) a dire “running out” situation. I expect it to be more of a food price arbitrage situation. I’ve canned about a dozen meals worth of chicken meat ( I like mine better than the store bought cans). I’ll be canning another batch “soon”. Right now I can get it on sale at 79 ¢ to 99 ¢ per pound. I expect that to be $1.50 in 6 months to a year, maybe. I’ll let other folks pay up then and make my own chicken and rice. Even things like ocean fish, not subject to rain and snow, will likely have price rises as folks buy more alternatives to their “usual” meat as the prices rise or the supply drops. One pound of dry goods feeds a person for a day with plenty to spare. Dry goods are running abut $1 / pound. That’s about $360 for food for a year. 6 tanks of gas. Then you get to stop buying beans, rice, canned goods, etc. for a few months as you “rotate stock” using up the first of it you bought. A pretty small price to pay for avoiding the whole issue of weather driven crop losses and price swings.

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About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
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108 Responses to W.O.O.D. – 24 December 2019 – The Christmas / Solstice WOOD

  1. Larry Ledwick says:

    Well we are technically in Christmas Eve here in the mountain time zone so Merry Christmas to those who will be away from their computers the next couple days.

    I just had a pleasant and unexpected surprise Microsoft actually did something right (so far)
    I just went through the online upgrade process from my windows 7 pro 64 bit desktop to windows 10. It actually worked as you would expect it to (ie as it should). So far all my applications have worked first time with no fiddling, the upgrade did not brick my system and all my desktop icons and task bar icons are where they are supposed to be and actually work.

    I even opened photoshop and stitched a quick panorama and it actually worked a bit faster than I expected. Maybe Win 10 is better at using graphics chip processors or some such but it did the process very quickly.

    Twitter recognized I was logging in from a new device and sent me an email to ask if that was me.
    (and my email worked) as did my vpn which just connected as usual.

  2. E.M.Smith says:

    As I’m painfully aware, I’m near the end of the cycle of days. (Hawaii is 2 hours further on, but not much beyond me, really, to the international date line). I’m always “late to the global party”.

    So I’ve chosen to run the Blog on Greenwich Mean Time / UTC.

    Australia / New Zealand are way ahead of all of the rest of us. I left there once via plane and while the flight took something horrid like 18 hours, I arrived in California an hour before I left…

    Thus my title on this posting of 24 December, even though, technically, it was 23 Dec when I posted it from here, but 24 in the TZ of the blog, UTC….

    AND: Yes, a Merry Christmas to all.

    In about 13 hours I’m having desert with family & friends. I’ve baked an apple and a peach pie and I’m waiting for them to cool enough to put in a container for transport (all of 2 blocks…).

    We have a kind of Pot Luck Get Together. Each person brings an assigned category. Some have drinks, others pies, or ice cream, or cookies or “etc.”.

    So yes, you can expect an “outage” of comments from me starting in about an hour and running for about 14 to 15.

    We did a bit of FaceTime with the Son & DIL in Chicago yesterday. Saw the grandson and heard the new granddaughter expressing her opinion about Nap Time in the distance ;-) I’m hoping to get to Chicago about February. (Spouse goes in January… and I get to Dog Sit…)

    I really am happy about what my Son has achieved with his life. A good job, a good wife, and a good family. Even ranking in his church (not sure exactly how far up, but does music and some amount of speaking. Has his minister credentials.) Just wish he would find sinners to save somewhere with less snow than Chicago ;-)

    Well, I need to go check the pies again and see if they have cooled enough to put them away, or am I mixing another Tang & Vodka? (Hey, it’s a Prepper Thing…. What, you mean you DON’T have some “keeps forever mixer” and “fuel / barter / anaesthetic / antiseptic” liquid that needs “rotation and testing”, um, “periodically”? For shame!! ;-)

  3. A C Osborn says:

    Merry Christmas to you too E M and of course to all those posters that celebrate it.
    To those that don’t, have a nice holiday.

  4. beththeserf says:

    Likewise E.M. and Denizens, supporters of ye laws of physics. ) Happy Xmas.

  5. corev says:

    Merry Christmas to all!

  6. H.R. says:

    Yup. Just getting started on Christmas prep here in Florida.

    My sister, who lives in Lakeland, Florida, is hosting Christmas dinner. She did that last year as well. We brought desserts from a specialty bakery and a side. It was really great to spend Christmas with her and her hubby because she has made – I think – only one Christmas in the last 25 years up to the family stomping grounds in the frozen Midwest.

    This year, her oven is out. Bummer! So I’m buying a heat-n-eat dinner from Cracker Barrel. For those outside the U.S., it’s a national restaurant chain with an ‘Old Country Store’ theme and serves classic American Southern comfort food and breakfast anytime.

    https://www.crackerbarrel.com/

    Problem. My travel trailer oven is too small. Well, as it happens, my wife’s cousin and his wife are Wintering in the Tampa Bay area. They just retired this year and bought a 5th-wheel. He was born in South Africa. My wife was born in London, England. We’ve always gotten together for Thanksgiving or Christmas because the wife and cousin are pretty much it for family in the States. All the rest of their family is still in Scotland.

    So I’m heading out in an hour or so to pick up the dinner at a Cracker Barrel near the cousins. Then we’ll stop at their trailer and split up the dinner. Between the two travel trailer ovens, we have enough space to fix the dinner tomorrow and meet up at my sister’s house.

    Christmas dinner will be a bit different this year. Since actual from-scratch cooking is not on the agenda for anyone this year, Christmas Day will be pretty relaxed.

    Oh, the other nice thing about Christmas when you are older; there’s no Christmas shopping to speak of. We are all blessed with having pretty much whatever we need and most of the toys we coveted and bought over the years. There no toys to buy that anyone can afford. For example, I want a Bugatti Veyron, but I’m not expecting one under the tree. My wife has all the diamonds, rubies, and tanzanite toys she has wanted – too many to wear, now – and is planning how to split up and pass on all but a few pieces.

    My sister wants a poinsettia to plant by her front steps. My wife’s cousin and my brother-in-law are getting 4 oz lead pyramid sinkers from me. They can’t get them easily inland and they are both out of them. My wife wanted a dense foam pool floatie lounger (not cheap as pool toys go, but still only eighty bucks) so I got her one. Christmas Shopping is done and done.

    I’ll be checking in here time-to-time for random reflections and holiday notes that the usual suspects might post here during quiet times.

    To all the Chiefio Blog denizens in the States and around the World, I wish everyone a Merry Christmas. It’s a great day to kick back with family and friends or relax by yourself, regardless of the religious meaning (or lack of) it holds for anyone. The World as a whole gets pretty calm on Christmas day. It’s generally a good day off for the World.

  7. beththeserf says:

    glo- bull war-ming, omg, panic stations every one!

  8. Simon Derricutt says:

    Whether you’re celebrating Solstice, Christmas, Chanukah, or whatever, have a good end of year. I’ve had an interesting year, and looks like next year will be more interesting with the (very) odd Physics stuff I’m doing. Thanks to the people here who didn’t automatically write it off as crackpot stuff, but saw the point I was making.

    Meantime, the politics this year has been pretty crazy. Over here in France I’m not affected much by Trump, but my friends over there note that people are better off and there’s more work around. It ought to be pretty obvious that if you leave money in peoples’ pockets they’ll spend it more efficiently than the government ever will, and so reducing tax rates produces a bigger pie for everyone and thus (since most countries are well over the Laffer curve) more actual taxes to do what governments do whilst making everyone in the country that bit better off. Over in the UK a lot of my friends are bemoaning the fact that Corbyn didn’t win the election, and start taxing those rich corporations and banks the way they should be. What they don’t seem to see is that those banks and corporations will simply raise their prices if they get taxed more, so the extra taxes will be paid by their customers (with a bit extra on top because of the inefficiencies) so in reality everyone pays and the poorest pay a larger percentage. Excessive taxing reduces the size of the overall pie, after all, and here in Europe the tax rates (including hidden taxes) are pretty high. That’s why the EU has to use protectionist policies – we’re handicapped by the weight of the taxes. I don’t expect that will change much, though.

    Also, the exhortations to “decarbonise” everything are getting shriller, despite the actual (unadjusted) data showing no acceleration of sea-level rise, no poles melting more than usual in Summer, and just a normal set of weather patterns if you don’t limit yourself to only looking back 30 years. Looking back 250 years or so on https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcet/graphs/HadCET_act_graphEX.gif shows the “warmest evah” 2019 to have been pretty average. Variability has been about normal, with some warmer periods and some cooler than average. Seems far more critical to look at the trends in late springs, early winters, wet/dry/freezing/hot at the wrong time for farming than the averages, anyway. Still, maybe soon we’ll have enough cheap energy to indoor farm far more and the problems of food production will go away.

    There seems to be a general trend towards emoting about things rather than looking at the actual data. I’m not good at emoting about things…. Given the way Polar bears are happily increasing their population, I’m not going to worry about them going extinct because they won’t have enough ice, especially since I see that they’ve survived ice-less Arctics before. During the MWP there was obviously less ice up there than there is now. Polar bears are fine. Next….

    Technology changes at an amazing rate. I figure we’ll fix the real problems as we come to them, and the pretend problems don’t need fixing.

  9. E.M.Smith says:

    Hey, H.R., you could buy her one of these for emergency / holiday use. A portable electric oven.

    https://www.amazon.com/Electric-22-Quart-Capacity-Versatile-Self-Basting/dp/B01N9O1BWT

    Some years back when making Thanksgiving dinner for a large herd ( about 10 ) at the S.I.L. house, I bought one like it, so we could do the Turkey and pies and warm rolls and cook casseroles, despite only one medium electric oven built in. Works well, though the lid gets hot.

    No longer needed now that were down to at most 6 folks but often 4 or even just 2 for meals (some moved to Chicago, then 3 are now vegetarian so offended by the Turkey… we do it at home now, for just the 2 of us). But it is a nice option for added oven capacity and uses a regular 120 V outlet.

    IIRC I got mine at Walmart.

  10. Larry Ledwick says:

    Hmmm interesting idea! I might have to get one of those.
    Much more convenient that using the big oven. I assume it would also work well for roast beef and veggies (sort of like a high capacity hot pot capable of higher temperatures).
    (would also be a way to do oven baking on emergency generator power if it does not draw too much peak current, and you have a generator running anyway for lights etc.)

  11. Larry Ledwick says:

    A little Christmas humor

  12. Steve C says:

    The very best wishes to all from Nottingham, along with a little prayer for a bit less turbulence in the next year (which will probably go unanswered). Sunset here (15:51) already 3 minutes later than it was this time last week, while sunrise hits its latest (08:18) on Boxing Day, ’til New Year. Christmas Day predicted bright but cold. All, with the aid of a little wine, is well, midwinter not too bleak. Santé!

  13. Nancy & John Hultquist says:

    I think I see a connection:

    ” . . . the Yellow Vests in France said they will keep protesting.”
    And there is this info: a large cruise ship under construction
    And: in SF, dogs have to wear booties to avoid human poo

    Hong Kong and Chili have “troubles” along with the usual hell holes.
    A news item the other day was about a large cruise ship under construction: “The Trick to Making a 180,000-Ton Carnival Cruise Ship Feel Cozy” – – building its largest ship ever, the Mardi Gras, which can hold 6,641 people.
    Upon further searching I found that there are dozens of such things being built.
    Then I just read that the rich are sailing to St. Barts and other places on their personal cruise ships.

    So, unless you have enough money to provide for your own health and safety, comfort, and wine – – –
    . . . tourism is problematic for the tourist, and regions that rely economically much on tourist money are in a world of hurt.

  14. u.k.(us) says:

    Forget all the PC traps, and just enjoy it ?

  15. Nancy & John Hultquist says:

    If protein gets expensive, I have a solution — Eurasian collared dove.

    ” Mac N Cheese makes a great casserole”

    Did so with a box of Rice-A-Roni — creamy four cheese variety.
    [ shelf life — I did not check ]
    Added a few things, mostly left over turkey,
    but one of the Eurasian collared doves would work and would only cost a 22 shell.

    Back to reading.

  16. Nancy & John Hultquist says:

    Should have mentioned that the turkey was a 4.5 pound breast-only that I bought and froze 2 years ago.
    We’ve had 1 power outage in those 2 years. It lasted about 3 hours but with extra space in freezer filled with 2 Lt bottles of H2O that was not a problem. There are different scenarios.

  17. philjourdan says:

    @Larry Ledwick – Re MS Update

    I just finished upgrading my wife’s old computer as well. (it is 10 years old and died – corrupt HD), so not out of desire, but out of necessity (it came with Win7). I found a link on HowToGeek, and apparently, as long as you have a valid Windows key, the upgrade is still free. It never asked me for a key (since it was an OEM license). And it was the smoothest upgrade I have ever done.

    I got my wife a new one when hers died as I was not sure I could recover her old one. But it did so now she has 3 (nice new touch screen/ssd, a 2-n-1 and her old 17 inch one).

  18. Taz says:

    ZeroNet mischief is hard perhaps impossible to stop. So what would could be done to arouse the Dims to make them behave more stupid?

    I’m talking real lultz stuff that gets passed around…..

    “Pleeez,pleez – just make it stop!”

    Don’t normally enjoy kicking cripples. This is a special case.

  19. Larry Ledwick says:

    A brief musical interlude for Christmas – don’t disturb the cat.

  20. Taz says:

    @Nancy & John Hultquist
    “And: in SF, dogs have to wear booties to avoid human poo”

    Yuk. Hope those booties are disposable :(

    I just don’t understand SF helplessness. They remind me of idiots who keep walking past the nail in the parking lot instead of taking the initiative and picking it up. We allow such people to vote?

    Bill Mahr has stated publicly that Los Angeles spends $500,000 to remove each homeless person. Just can’t imagine the chain of useless eaters involved in that transaction.

    Prefab concrete construction shack domes with kitchen and bathrooms can probably be had for <$10K each. One would only need to lay plumbing and electrical with total construction time taking less than a day. So why is California so helpless. Wasn't always that way. SF once churned out hundreds of troop carriers as a marvel of efficiency. What happened?

  21. Nancy & John Hultquist says:

    Taz says: Los Angeles spends $500,000 to remove each homeless person.{Bill Mahr}

    The plan, I think, is to “remove” them to modular stacked units (like a cobbled together apartment complex). These will be connected to all necessary amenities, a prefab community, with services and whatever.
    Government run, poor execution, people unused to responsibility . . .
    What can go wrong?

  22. philjourdan says:

    @Taz, Nancy & John – I like Oakland’s solution – rent a cruise ship and house them there. What can go wrong?

  23. Larry Ledwick says:

    The newest move is to use shipping containers for homeless housing. They only cost about $4000 for the bare container then you just need to do plumbing, heating, windows and doors and you have a small crash pad that is durable and easy to setup. A single container creates a 160 sq/ft tiny home, a couple stacked together can create module like a nice mobile home.

    https://www.ocregister.com/2017/04/04/how-these-shipping-containers-converted-to-housing-have-affected-homeless-veterans/

    https://www.lamag.com/citythinkblog/shipping-container-homeless-housing/

    http://www.24hplans.com/top-20-shipping-container-home-designs-and-their-costs/

  24. Larry Ledwick says:

    Just in time for Christmas dinner, the Trump administration rolls out a web site to help you win political debates. (I love the URL)
    This of course assumes the snow flake being debated even knows how logic and debate works.

    https://snowflakevictory.com/

  25. Another Ian says:

    Larry

    That will likely cause some indigestion!

  26. jim2 says:

    Merry Christmas!

  27. E.M.Smith says:

    @Taz:

    Yeah, makes censorship near impossible. From the wiki:

    As of 2016 there was no way to take down a ZeroNet page which still had seeders, thus making such pages immune to third-party methods of taking them down, including DMCA takedown notices.

    Per SF / LA: you answer your own question. With whom does the $500, 000 get spent? Oh, SEIU Government union members and the government contractors who donate to the politicians in charge. Who gets screwed? The tax payers who do not get an itemized bill..

    @Lartt L : Nice!

    Merry Christmas to all!

  28. Ossqss says:

    If the pic doesn’t load, MerryXmas, or happy whatever you celebrate this time of year to all!

  29. Larry Ledwick says:

    Merry Christmas to all – one of the great legacies of western European Culture will be the chorus and symphonic productions. The grand music intended to be performed in the great Cathedrals of Europe, The majority were produced in a religious context, but even if you could not understand the words, the songs carry a message in the music alone.

    Hopefully all will enjoy these choices regardless of religious affiliations.

  30. billinoz says:

    African Swine fever & Australia mentioned in passing !
    Here’s some detailed info :
    Biosecurity high alert against African Swine Fever
    Monday,23 December 2019
    Australians travelling to Bali or heading elsewhere overseas for holidays can expect unprecedented airport scrutiny on their way back into Australia as biosecurity officers step up defences against African swine fever (ASF).

    Following confirmation of ASF in North Sumatra and concerns the devastating pig disease is present in other Indonesian provinces–having already reached Vietnam, Timor Leste, Cambodia and elsewhere in Asia–Australian biosecurity officials are on high alert for any ASF breach.

    “With ASF edging nearer and posing a threat that would cripple our $5.2 billion pork industry, as well as threaten our trade reputation, environment and economy, we are asking Australians and international visitors to be on guard over the coming months,” said Agriculture Department biosecurity head Lyn O’Connell.

    “Summer is when our ports, airports and mail centres are busiest, but this holiday season will require extra vigilance from everyone as ASF is spreading and adds to pest and disease threats that could devastate our environment, health and agricultural industries.

    “If you’re going overseas, think hard about what you bring back and if you visit a farm or go off track to a rural area, declare it when you come home and avoid bringing high-risk products in your luggage and remove potentially contaminated soil on your shoes and camping gear.”

    African swine fever is a highly contagious viral disease of domestic and wild pigs that has established itself in Asia and parts of Europe, and continues to spread. While the disease does not affect humans, ASF kills about 80 per cent of the pigs it infects, with serious repercussions for the global food chain.

    Biosecurity searches are being stepped up since ASF was reported in Indonesia this month and Timor-Leste in September, with the government boosting biosecurity funding by $66.6 million to arrest the threat.

    Extra funding will see more officers, detector dogs and high-tech three-dimensional x-ray machines on the front line of airports and mail centres, with international passengers including Australians arriving home from Bali being warned to declare or risk heavy penalties and fines.

    Around 130 extra frontline biosecurity officers will be deployed over summer to do half a million more passenger screenings a year, while detector dogs are in place at airports including Cairns, Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane and Darwin.

    Biosecurity officers will continue to have a no tolerance policy, and issue infringements for deliberate non-compliance with biosecurity rules at ports and airports, while a new biosecurity squad will check products brought into Australia for sale.

    Arriving passengers, Ms. O’Connell said, can expect extra questions and detector dogs on duty to maximise detection of high-risk products, with ASF signage, social media, and audio and video warnings, ramped up on all flights.

    The Department of Agriculture has written to airlines and cruise ship operators ahead of Christmas to place ASF information in airports, in-flight and in passenger cabins.

    “International passengers are a major risk path and over 235,000 biosecurity risk items were intercepted across Australia’s international airports between January and October,” said Ms. O’Connell.

    “We’re asking all Australians and international visitors to help protect Australia from serious biosecurity risks by being aware of what they can and can’t send or carry into Australia from overseas, especially high risk food items like pork and scraps that can carry ASF through our front door.”

    Source : https://www.agriculture.gov.au/about/media-centre/media-releases/biosecurity-high-alert-asf?fbclid=IwAR0M0aFlo8m5RWuLyTbSCnozwFwBw8It7MoZrmmSIS1-3CKE1z6TfTDqZdQ

    For more information on what can and cannot be brought into Australia, visit agriculture.gov.au/travelling

  31. Bill In Oz says:

    African Swine fever & Australia mentioned in passing !
    Here’s some detailed info :
    Biosecurity high alert against African Swine Fever
    Monday,23 December 2019
    Australians travelling to Bali or heading elsewhere overseas for holidays can expect unprecedented airport scrutiny on their way back into Australia as biosecurity officers step up defences against African swine fever (ASF).

    Following confirmation of ASF in North Sumatra and concerns the devastating pig disease is present in other Indonesian provinces–having already reached Vietnam, Timor Leste, Cambodia and elsewhere in Asia–Australian biosecurity officials are on high alert for any ASF breach.

    “With ASF edging nearer and posing a threat that would cripple our $5.2 billion pork industry, as well as threaten our trade reputation, environment and economy, we are asking Australians and international visitors to be on guard over the coming months,” said Agriculture Department biosecurity head Lyn O’Connell.

    “Summer is when our ports, airports and mail centres are busiest, but this holiday season will require extra vigilance from everyone as ASF is spreading and adds to pest and disease threats that could devastate our environment, health and agricultural industries.

    “If you’re going overseas, think hard about what you bring back and if you visit a farm or go off track to a rural area, declare it when you come home and avoid bringing high-risk products in your luggage and remove potentially contaminated soil on your shoes and camping gear.”

    African swine fever is a highly contagious viral disease of domestic and wild pigs that has established itself in Asia and parts of Europe, and continues to spread. While the disease does not affect humans, ASF kills about 80 per cent of the pigs it infects, with serious repercussions for the global food chain.

    Biosecurity searches are being stepped up since ASF was reported in Indonesia this month and Timor-Leste in September, with the government boosting biosecurity funding by $66.6 million to arrest the threat.

    Extra funding will see more officers, detector dogs and high-tech three-dimensional x-ray machines on the front line of airports and mail centres, with international passengers including Australians arriving home from Bali being warned to declare or risk heavy penalties and fines.

    Around 130 extra frontline biosecurity officers will be deployed over summer to do half a million more passenger screenings a year, while detector dogs are in place at airports including Cairns, Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane and Darwin.

    Biosecurity officers will continue to have a no tolerance policy, and issue infringements for deliberate non-compliance with biosecurity rules at ports and airports, while a new biosecurity squad will check products brought into Australia for sale.

    Arriving passengers, Ms. O’Connell said, can expect extra questions and detector dogs on duty to maximise detection of high-risk products, with ASF signage, social media, and audio and video warnings, ramped up on all flights.

    The Department of Agriculture has written to airlines and cruise ship operators ahead of Christmas to place ASF information in airports, in-flight and in passenger cabins.

    “International passengers are a major risk path and over 235,000 biosecurity risk items were intercepted across Australia’s international airports between January and October,” said Ms. O’Connell.

    “We’re asking all Australians and international visitors to help protect Australia from serious biosecurity risks by being aware of what they can and can’t send or carry into Australia from overseas, especially high risk food items like pork and scraps that can carry ASF through our front door.”

    Source : https://www.agriculture.gov.au/about/media-centre/media-releases/biosecurity-high-alert-asf?fbclid=IwAR0M0aFlo8m5RWuLyTbSCnozwFwBw8It7MoZrmmSIS1-3CKE1z6TfTDqZdQ

    For more information on what can and cannot be brought into Australia, visit agriculture.gov.au/travelling

  32. cdquarles says:

    We wish you a Merry Christmas
    We wish you a Merry Christmas
    and a Happy New Year

  33. pg sharrow says:

    It will be very difficult to prevent the spread of Swine Flu. Birds are a vector that spreads many virus. When I was a hog producer, birds were a problem that had to be considered, specially migratory ones, Very good sanitation and isolation are the only real defense in preventing infection in your herd….pg

  34. E.M.Smith says:

    ASF can survive in things like pigs ears dog treats of dirt on a bird foot.

    It is an interesting test of our ability to limit transmission in a world of global transport. A good exemplar of what we can do against a new Spanish Flu or agressive Ebola.

  35. gallopingcamel says:

    @beththeserf,
    I share your enthusiasm for the Goodies so I have some facts that may interest you.
    Bill Oddie was a talented cartoonist who could have made a decent living at it.
    Bill Oddie was quite short but he was an excellent athlete. You can sense that in the gymnasium video……check out those sturdy legs. He played fly half for my college 2nd Rugby team. That may not sound impressive until I mention that our 1st team fly half was Gordon Waddell, captain of the Scottish national team.

  36. philjourdan says:

    @Larry Ledwick says:
    25 December 2019 at 9:57 am

    First I want to thank you for the beautiful music!!! But apparently cats do not like it! I started listening to selections and the smallest one (about 4 months now) perked up his ears and then ran and hid! I went looking for him during the 3rd song and found him cowering with his sister in the closet!

    So while I thoroughly enjoyed the selections (and agree with you on the origins) apparently the purpose may have been to get rid of critters as well! :-)

  37. Another Ian says:

    Maths lessons still needed

    “Bloomberg: RCP8.5 Climate Catastrophe is Unlikely – Because of Cheap Renewables”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/

    A conclusion from that article:-

    “When climate academics make absurd claims about the terrifying 110+ heatwaves which will make entire nations uninhabitable, they lose the members of the audience who actually experience such conditions on a regular basis in their every day working lives.”

    Incidently we made about 42 C for Xmas Day

  38. philjourdan says:

    @Bill and EM

    If there was a human virus that spread so rapidly and with such deadly effect, man would have devised either a treatment, vaccine or cure. They have for most of the worst ones. I suspect it has not gotten painful enough to warrant the research. But if it continues to spread it will.

    Part of the problem is that human virii necessitate that the most humans survive it. But that does not extend to pigs. So the urgency is not there – until people start starving.

  39. gallopingcamel says:

    Chiefio said:
    “BREXIT
    Boris won. His Parliament is behind him. They past a law saying basically “Its On! No More Extensions.”

    So now it’s January 2021 – “This time for Sure!”. But will it be BINO? Brexit In Name Only?”

    If that is the target date I doubt if Boris will survive. Here is a link that puts the date one year earlier:
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/7684780/brexit-key-dates-2019-timeline/

    The Sun is not the most reliable newspaper so maybe they got it wrong.

  40. Larry Ledwick says:

    @Larry Ledwick says:
    25 December 2019 at 9:57 am

    First I want to thank you for the beautiful music!!!

    Thanks! There few great songs that have as deep a personal connection to me that Handel’s Messiah. Mostly due to an accident of time and place. The church I was raised in always sang the Messiah chorus as part of Easter Services. The Reverend had an interesting way of elevating the music to its rightful presentation. At the end of Easter Services he would call all former Choir members out of the congregation and they joined the current Choir in the Choir loft to create a rather substantial Choir for that one performance, the power of that large Choir encouraged the congregation to really participate in the singing of the chorus.

    I remember probably when I was about 9 or 10 during that event that I was seated right beside my Mother and as we stood and sung the song I suddenly realized that she was a pretty accomplished Soprano with a clear clean voice.

    That is probably why I have a fondness for some of the gifted popular singers who also are sopranos like the ladies in Celtic Women and Lorena Mckinnett who has an absolutely angelic voice when she sings the right songs. I also happen to like Lorena’s knack for using traditional instruments and a Mediterranean melody in her compositions.

    I sang in Choir through out school (mostly Junior High) and in the Navy was in the San Diego Blue Jacket Choir in boot camp.

    Being completely immersed in a large Choir enthusiastically singing a composition like The Messiah is a visceral experience, you can feel the notes in your chest especially if there is a proper pipe organ being played as accompaniment.

    This is Loreena McKennitt –
    All Souls Night

    Lady of Shalott

    Caravanserai

    See if these put the cats back in the closet ;)

  41. Larry Ledwick says:

    Hmmm this is interesting?

    https://apnews.com/1bb099d3e59294a6931671a4941b89f2

    There is basically nothing out there but farm land.

    Perhaps someone is trying to work out a drone swarm method for rapid response to emergencies or looking for downed aircraft or some such. A little too early in the evening to do IR searches for pot grow houses and that sort of thing (would be best to do that in the wee hours of the morning when the ground had cooled as much as possible.)

    Will be interesting if the back story ever comes out.

    https://www.google.com/maps/@40.3284371,-102.1746884,76390m/data=!3m1!1e3

  42. E.M.Smith says:

    @Larry L:

    Maybe it is Google testing their new 4K Backyard View mapping….

    Given the number and size, it has to be government or largish corporation. Late like that, unlikely ag mapping; not dropping stuff so not ag activity. I’d guess military test over featureless farm terrain to stress test coordinated navigation.

    @G.C.:

    Note it says Brexit Day, then another year of negotiating before a final Brexit perhaps with no deal, on the following New Years… Yes, badly written about a badly structured schedule.

  43. Larry Ledwick says:

    I was pondering some similar “calibration” type activities, I have a of couple ideas, but think I best keep them to myself. As you mentioned the size of the operations strongly implies big dollar backing from large organizations.

    Unrelated side note on the difficulty of making precision temperature measurements in the real world.

    I put out a new remote temperature sensor today, sender on this one is good to -31 deg F instead of -14 deg F which is pretty easy to hit here during a cold outbreak.

    This new sensor is about 8 ft from another remote thermometer that I have had in place for years. (old one is hard wired, new one is remote radio link at 433 mhz.

    Temperature when I put it out was about 50 degrees, it is currently 31.8 degrees F on the new sensor, and the old thermometer probe is showing 31.9 deg F – it has taken 12 hours for the two sensors to converge to essentially identical readings. When you are talking measurements in 0.1 deg F increments it takes a long time for the sensor to fully acclimate to the new location. Just a few hours ago the differential between them was about 2 degrees F.

    The new sensor is set out away from walls and other heat sinks and is now finally showing a temperature of 31.5 deg while the other older sensor which is in a slightly more sheltered location and just a few inches from an exterior wall is still showing 31.9 deg F.

    Looks like the new sensor will, as I hoped, have less bias from thermal influence of the building walls and respond faster to minor fluctuations. As I have been composing this post it has moved both up and down a couple tenths of a degree just from minor air current changes.

  44. Another Ian says:

    “Inch by inch, row by row – – ”

    “Against all Odds – Three FBI Officials Quietly Working to Reveal the Truth…”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2019/12/25/three-fbi-officials-quietly-working-to-reveal-the-truth/

    Plus a couple of threads further down

  45. Bill In Oz says:

    RE ASF : Foreign passengers detected with any pork products on incoming airline flights, are being refused an entry visa. So far 4 such individuals have been detected. Refused entry and sent back to wherever they came from. All from Vietnam or China.. Will also be refused any entry visa to Australia for three years !
    Some folks need to learn this lesson the hard way.

  46. H.R. says:

    @Bill In Oz: Any idea what the pork products were?

    I’m thinking it wasn’t a half-eaten order of pork fried rice that they brought along to avoid airline food. Or maybe pork food items are included.

    Yes, that was harsh, but ASF is serious stuff and they didn’t line up and shoot any of those four people. One can’t fault Australia for strict enforcement.

  47. Graeme No.3 says:

    @gallopingcamel:
    When I first went to the UK in 1977 I bought a copy of The Sun and decided that I wouldn’t buy another. The same with The Mirror, but I must admit that I found that the News of the World was a laugh on Sunday, while being as salacious as the others. I wasn’t too sure about The Manchester Guardian (as it then was) which struck me as a propaganda sheet (unimpeeded by accuracy).
    By my next trip in 2013 both The Sun and The Mirror had run out of girls wanting to expose their big boobs on page 3, probably because the big boobs were writing for The Guardian.

    The bushfires have, thanks to heroics by our firefighters, spared most of our town. I haven’t been able to get a copy of the map of the fires but it shows 3 towns surrounded by 90-95% burnt areas.
    I’ve escaped with a small burnt patch in my front garden and a little disturbance where the firefighters had to use my backyard to put out a tree fire in the house behind me.
    As someone said “If you and your house are still standing, then it’s a Good Christmas”.

    A belated Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all.

  48. Bill in Oz says:

    HR All of those detections were of uncooked hidden pork in luggage. And all were undeclared.
    All people entering Australia have to fill in a form stating whether they are carrying prohibited items like raw meat, fruits, seeds etc. Lying on this declaration form is an offence under Australian law.

    There are almost dumping points where arriving passengers can off load such prohibited items before going through customs & quarantine. Then there is no penalty. The contents of these bins are all incinerated.

  49. Ossqss says:

    That is an interesting Drone item Larry. Albeit, those would not be the typical helicopter style drones we see frequently. The ceiling to legally fly a personal drone is 400′ per the FAA rules I have to obey. All civilian Drones are actually programmed not to exceed that height and also to avoid protected/controlled spaces. They are also required to label the Drones with their FAA numbers. Those Drones are winged and that would somewhat explain why they can stay up for so long. I am lucky to get 20 minutes out of a battery with my Phantom 3 Pro.

    I would also note, If somebody (law enforcement) really wanted to ID the who, what, where on those mystery Drones, I don’t think it would be very hard to do.

  50. Larry Ledwick says:

    Graeme No3 – glad to hear you only got some small issues with the fires, good to hear you dodged the bullet and can relax a bit. Belated Merry Christmas to you as well.

  51. Larry Ledwick says:

    Looks like the Iranian people are like the people in Hong Kong nearing their limit of tolerance to the abuses of the government, and recognize who their real enemy is.

  52. E.M.Smith says:

    It would be humorous for the Senate or POTUS to file a suit against Pelosi for obstruction of justice for sitting on The Articles….

  53. Ossqss says:

    Talk about coincidence. I got an email from the FAA an hour ago asking for comments on the below. LOL, no BS. One wonders who is watching this site?

    https://www.faa.gov/uas/research_development/remote_id/

  54. Serioso says:

    Merry Christmas to All, and a very good New Year as well. I’ve just finished reading my first present, which I heartily recommend to y’all. It’s “The Fifth Risk,” by Michael Lewis, the author of “Liar’s Poker,” “Moneyball.” “The Big Short,” among many others less well known. It’s available in paperback (despite a 2018 copyright date). and it’s a quick and educational read. And the risk itself? Let’s just call it mismanagement.

  55. jim2 says:

    From the article:
    The Fifth Risk is a 2018 political book by Michael Lewis. It examines the transition and political appointments of the Donald Trump presidency, especially with respect to three government agencies: the Department of Energy, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Commerce.[1][2][3][4][5] The book spent fourteen weeks on the The New York Times non-fiction best-seller list.[6]

    Barack and Michelle Obama acquired the rights to the book for a possible Netflix series about the U.S. Government.[7]

    Lewis is known for his non-fiction works, including The Big Short and Moneyball.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fifth_Risk

  56. jim2 says:

    It’s really sad and too bad Michael Lewis didn’t examine Obama’s IRS. I’m sure there were plenty other things to examine in the Obama administration, like for example putting someone who voted for a Communist in charge of the CIA. McCarthy was right, only his methods were wrong.

  57. Power Grab says:

    FYI: Oklahoma State University is the first 4 year university to have a graduate degree specific to UAS.;

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=okstate.edu+%2B+uas&atb=v143-1&ia=web

  58. Gail Combs says:

    Just dropping in to wish you guys a Merry Christmas and a wonderful New Year.

  59. philjourdan says:

    @Larry Ledwick – no, my critters love Loreena, as do I (I have almost all her work). So we had a very mellow time listening to your selections. She is so great!

    Thanks!

  60. Another Ian says:

    Gail Combs says:
    26 December 2019 at 8:54 pm

    Hi Gail
    Season’s greetings.

    A long time ago as I recall you posted a dissection of the TPP here where you found that of 29 chapters only 5 had to do with trade. Any chance of a link to that, as I haven’t been able to find it? It would be useful to quote at people here in Oz when “Son of TPP” (which we signed) comes up.

    TIA

    Ian
    .

  61. philjourdan says:

    @Another Ian – re: starbucks – Karma is a bitch.

    Eventually these companies are going to figure out the woke crowd is not their customer base.

  62. E.M.Smith says:

    @Another Ian:

    Glad to hear about Starbuckling getting the drop… I’d have never known about it otherwise. See, I’ve not been in a Starbucks in a year or more… Swapped to Pete’s on the S.B. being all wokey woke and never looked back. Now I’m even just taking a thermos instead a lot of the time.

    On cross country trips, I’ll be packing the Trangia and a small espresso pot (those angular Italian things) for roll your own on the roll…

    They did, afterall, tell me they were actively working against my values and rights, with left wing progressive ideology support. So, hey, I can make coffee for myself. I’m not a helpless progressive snowflake…

  63. Another Ian says:

    For review

    “https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2019/12/tulsi-was-great-at-christmas.html”

  64. YMMV says:

    Sting concert in Durham Cathedral, “A Winter’s Night”

  65. gallopingcamel says:

    @Graeme No.3,
    I agree with your comment about the Sun. When I left the UK in 1982 the national newspapers each had a target audience:

    The Times was for the people who ran the country
    The Guardian was for the people who thought they should run the country
    The Financial Times was for the people who owned the country
    The Express was for the wives of the people running the country
    The Daily Worker was for people who wanted another country to run the country
    The News of the World was for people who liked sex scandals
    The Sun was for people who did not care who ran the country as long as the girl on page 3 had big………

  66. Another Ian says:

    Over at The Air Vent

    “Truth”

    https://noconsensus.wordpress.com/2019/12/17/15180/

  67. Jon K says:

    I’m so proud of them. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/us/amelia-ohio-dissolve.html

    Also, a sign of things to come???

  68. E.M.Smith says:

    The Progressive Left is an incurable mental disorder enabled by an ideology and lusting for power and fueled by greed for graft these days too. You can not cure it, you can only toss if out of power for a while or burn down the government it parasitizes.

  69. Larry Ledwick says:

    Looks like we may have had another “sputnik moment”

    https://apnews.com/597e7f2b20b21af959e4c6983b255c37

    Will be interesting to see how far along our own research is in this area as well and counter measures that can adapt to such systems. (high energy lasers etc.)

  70. ossqss says:

    Ok, so I saw an ad on the Science Channel for this new show. Bait or what?

    https://www.discovery.com/science/things-that-make-you-go-boom-

  71. ossqss says:

    Still getting use to this convertible Lenovo laptop set up. Quite good with the Ryzen 5, gen3 (3500u) and Samsung NVMe gen3 x4 drive. I must say, just different than my Android table procedurally and way faster than anything I have used to date on any platform. I don’t buy 3k PCs. I will say again, the SSD drive, particularly the PCIe NVMe version, is a difference maker. Not an over clocked CPU either.

  72. Larry Ledwick says:

    Interesting article on how the Coup against President Trump began

    https://thefederalist.com/2019/10/28/how-the-obama-administration-set-in-motion-democrats-coup-against-trump/

    “If you really were going to do something like an assessment from the intelligence community, then you’d get input from all our seventeen agencies,” says Nunes. “They did the opposite. It was only FBI, CIA, NSA, and DNI. They siloed it, just like they had with Crossfire Hurricane. They kept everyone else away from it so they didn’t have to read them in.”

    So using this as a negative indicator these are the dirty agencies beholding to the deep state, here are the 17 agencies of the US intelligence community. Notice that as often commented by Qanon sources the glaring exception is the military intelligence commands. None of them were in the loop.
    It was Admiral Rogers (military) head of NSA that blew the whistle on the FISA abuse and wire taps / spying on President Trump and his campaign.

    The IC is headed by the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), whose statutory leadership is exercised through the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). The other 16 members of the IC are:[9]
    
    Organization	Parent Organization	Federal Department	Date est.
    Twenty-Fifth Air Force	United States Air Force	Defense	1948
    Intelligence and Security Command	United States Army	Defense	1977
    Central Intelligence Agency	none	Independent agency	1947
    Coast Guard Intelligence	United States Coast Guard	Homeland Security	1915
    Defense Intelligence Agency	United States Department of Defense	Defense	1961
    Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence	United States Department of Energy	Energy	1977
    Office of Intelligence and Analysis	United States Department of Homeland Security	Homeland Security	2007
    Bureau of Intelligence and Research	United States Department of State	State	1945
    Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence	United States Department of the Treasury	Treasury	2004
    Office of National Security Intelligence	Drug Enforcement Administration	Justice	2006
    Intelligence Branch	Federal Bureau of Investigation	Justice	2005
    Marine Corps Intelligence Activity	United States Marine Corps	Defense	1978
    National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency	United States Department of Defense	Defense	1996
    National Reconnaissance Office	United States Department of Defense	Defense	1961
    National Security Agency /Central Security Service	United States Department of Defense	Defense	1952
    Office of Naval Intelligence	United States Navy	Defense	1882
    
    
  73. p.g.sharrow says:

    Spy agencies are always embedded in the diplomatic corp of every Nation, the heart of the Nations leadership. They consider themselves a part of a nations leadership to the point of Managing a nations leadership through their control of information to the leadership. Leadership comes and goes but the “managers” are always there to “nudge” towards the “Correct” decision. The Diplomatic Corp is staffed by hiring the “Best & Brightest” from the best collages, The Elite of the Nation. The natural leadership that will guide the nation regardless of “leadership” changes..
    The State Department and their C.I.A. has been working to subvert the F.B.I. since It’s inception but strong leadership has resisted this encroachment until the Clintons and their C.I.A. watchdogs came into power and began wholesale displacement of the F.B.I.s leadership.
    The Military, State Department and the F.B.I. are supposed to provide independent streams of information to the Nations Elected Leadership, often with conflicting point of views, so that the elected leadership can make the judgement call in the best interest of All of the nation. Not just the best interest of one small group.
    Donald Trump brought something new to the table. He was not a part of the accepted Elite. With his own money and power base, his own Intelligence and security that are Loyal to him alone. Even though the “Deep State” pushed many of their people into the 3,000 positions that a president must fill he has been slowly finding and pushing them aside as they show their true loyalties…pg

  74. Another Ian says:

    “OAN Three Part Investigative Report on Ukraine, Corruption and Biden Family – Rudy Giuliani and Chanel Rion Travel to Ukraine…”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2019/12/28/oan-three-part-investigative-report-on-ukraine-corruption-and-biden-family-rudy-giuliani-and-chanel-rion-travel-to-ukraine/

    “One America News Investigates – Chanel Rion interviews several witnesses who destroy Adam Schiff’s baseless impeachment case against President Trump. In a three part EXCLUSIVE report, Rudy Giuliani debunks the impeachment hoax and exposes Biden family corruption in Ukraine. Starting with Part One:”

  75. Another Ian says:

    So there! You have been told!

    “Huff Post Howler ”

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2019/12/huff-post-howler.html

  76. Larry Ledwick says:

    Nice little snow event setting up for tomorrow in the north central plains.
    about 12 ” near Fargo ND and 18″ near Hibbing Minnisota

    https://www.windy.com/-New-snow-snowAccu?namConus,snowAccu,2019-12-30-14,40.561,-92.960,5,m:eYmadAn

  77. Larry Ledwick says:

    Interesting item here on Impeachment, a house impeachment does not expire a the adjournment of a session of Congress.

  78. Larry Ledwick says:

    Oh cool Colorado has one of the worst state pension funding ratios in the country.
    Glad I cashed mine out 20+ years ago because I was pretty sure it would collapse for I got around to depending on it.

  79. p.g.sharrow says:

    @ Another Ian says:
    29 December 2019 at 1:58 am I sat through the entire OAN 3 part on Ukraine. Learned a couple of things I hadn’t considered about the size of this corruption scheme. We may find out that the foreign aid program is the spigot for money laundering on a vast scale. No wonder they are desperate to cover this up at the State Department. Hillery said if she goes down half of Washington will hang with her. ..pg

  80. E.M.Smith says:

    @P.G.:

    That’s my sense of it too.

    We know Soros was getting money out of Ukraine as Quid Pro Joe shutdown of the prosecutor said so. We know Soros funnels money to Democrats.

    We know the C.I.A. and F.B.I are involved as they started and ran the coup attempt and Russia hoax.

    We know State Dept. Is involved as the Ambassadors were in on it and State was the conduit to the money laundry op. And still can’t say where $ $ Billions went.

    We know D.O.J. was involved as they provided the legal cover (no perp walks yet… and handing out immunity for garbage interviews like chocolates) and fronted Mueller to run the fraud of an “investigation”.

    I’d further assert guilt by association for the EPA and National Science Foundation as money laundries to run the Global Warming scam. Perhaps Dept. Of Ed. too.

    Which has me wondering how much of the massive Ag Dept. budget goes walkies…

    Then there’s D.O.E. giving grants and jerking companies around. We know AlGore via the family oil company picked up the Naval Oil Reserves on sale… long ago. Oxy Pete and Elk Hills, IIRC.

    Frankly, it is looking like one gigantic RICO to me…

    I vote for asset disgorgement for the lot of them AND assign the national debt to them for payment.

  81. Another Ian says:

    E.M.

    Think of the potential in aid projects that stipulate purchase of “made in USA gear”

  82. Larry Ledwick says:

    A list of what President Trump has done for Americans in his first term so far.

    hard to reconcile these actions with the assertion he is racist.
    Too bad the major media has not been supportive of these actions and publicized them better.

  83. Larry Ledwick says:

    It is clear that a lot of circular funds transfers are taking place in all the Federal funding programs where aid given to X comes back as a contract for Y or huge donation from Z to the folks approving or administering the programs.

    Personally I think that is what Giuliani is doing right now, I bet he is looking to see if RICO can be applied to pull that whole scam down to the ground. He is a RICO prosecutor specialist, having used it to successfully attack the New York Mob families.

  84. E.M.Smith says:

    At this point I can only hope Trump & Rudy & Barr are working the long game. Still waiting for that first perp walk…

    I’m also starting to wonder if Pelosi is sitting on the articles hoping to move the trial into the Senate after a Democrat win in the Senate in 2020. Yeah, kinda crazy talk, but so is a deep state coup and a House railroad kangaroo court with no crimes… these are now desperate folks who didn’t think that clearly to start with.

  85. pouncer says:

    Some of the “aid” circles make more sense than others. Subsidizing a weapons factory and giving aid to an unreliable ally to buy the weapons so that our “export” numbers look better is 17th century mercantilism at its worst — especially if / when the ally gives the weapons to our outright enemy to use or reverse engineer. (Boeing, Turkey, Russia, for example)

    But one idea I like. GIVE AWAY uranium fuel, slightly enriched, chemically pure, to nations that buy and use our electric power plant designs. BUY BACK the used fuel rods that are mixed uranium, plutonium, thorium, and mixed fission fragment elements. The partner nation gets cheap electricity. The US gets (A) economies of scale on building the plants. (B) oversight at the border about what the partner nations are doing with nuclear stuff. (Just weigh what was sent out and what was sent back — if the numbers don’t match expectations some comic book mad scientist with metal arms and goggles in some tiny lab lair in the mountains is trying to develop a death ray, or something…) (C) Economies of scale, again, in reprocessing the spent fuel for thorium for our own plants, and plutonium for our own weapons. (The rich nation that runs the program, writes the rules. Suck it, Putin.) Also makes storage of left over wastes (by-products we don’t yet know we need) in Yucca Mountain easier. (D) The US jump starting nuclear electric generation in such a fashion makes electricity cheaper in North America, too. The whole NA grid, not just the US. (E) The US can then brag (falsely, but who cares?) about how renewable nuclear energy has saved the planet from global warming, while bird-choppers, fish-manglers, and desert-poisoning alternatives-to-energy used in other nations have just made the the eco-system worse. America! F*CK YEAH! (E) We recover plenty of plutonium, fissile and otherwise, for the space program which desperately needs the element for batteries and habitat heat sources. (Also for new small weapons to be used against mad scientists and criminal masterminds deeply dug into mountain lair/labs …) (F) Political foes who object can be demonized as “ungenerous”. After all, step one is GIVING AWAY the fuel. Only a heartless bigot would oppose that, right?

    The downside is that right now the beneficiaries of such a program are entrenched players just as bad as Boeing. GE, Westinghouse, Hitachi, Toshiba — But possibly their lobbyists can buy the right congress critters to get it done when sensible rational argument simply fails.

  86. E.M.Smith says:

    @Pouncer:

    Interesting idea, but there are some issues. Mostly circling around how easy nuclear physics really is. It was called a nuclear pile because you litterally could just pile up carbon and fuel rods.

    It all comes down to neutron economy. Make a neutron efficient reactor, such as the CANDU, you don’t need enrichment at all. Make it with a couple of extra fuel channels (it can do online refueling) then you can just shove a bit of Th or U through that channel and breed Special Nuclear Material. That is what India did. That is why the Allied Powers took out the German heavy water plant in Norway in WWII.

    So unless you have detailed inspection of the reactor, control of the reactor type (why the USA has regularly dissed the CANDU and pushed big complicated light water designs) and prevent side channel activities (like research reactors and pool reactors) there will be the opportunity for slow proliferation.

  87. Another Ian says:

    Oh Gawd!

    “This initiative by the Citizens Climate Lobby has the support of Democrats and Republicans in Congress. It has been endorsed by Alan Greenspan, the late Paul Volcker, and Nobel laureate Myron Scholes in the free market camp, and Janet Yellen, Amartya Sen, and Larry Summers on the interventionist side…
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2019/12/26/oven-ready-climate-change-plan-turns-heat-polluters/

    Paul Homewood has the full text…plus a critique:

    27 Dec: Paul Homewood: AEP’s Carbon Tax Fantasy
    Ambrose is away with the fairies again!…
    (FULL TEXT)

    The flaws are so obvious that I should not have to explain them again, but here goes…READ ALL
    https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2019/12/27/aeps-carbon-tax-fantasy/

    Via

    http://joannenova.com.au/2019/12/goldman-sachs-pledges-750-billion-on-climate-change-bankers-just-want-to-save-the-world-too/#comment-2247488

  88. Larry Ledwick says:

    Very interesting – looks like Gab is getting ready to roll out a search engine.

  89. Larry Ledwick says:

  90. Larry Ledwick says:

    Texas church shooting today – this video is very graphic and intense so choose wisely if you have a problem with that!

    It also is a great example of the reality of an active shooter situation.
    Start to finish about 6 seconds.

  91. Larry Ledwick says:

    Wow interesting convergence of the sermon and the events.

  92. E.M.Smith says:

    Looks like Texas changed the law last June to allow guns in churches. AFTER a prior shooting killed 26.
    2 shot in this case, one a security guard volunteer.

    26.
    2.

    Just sayin’… looks like the change saves lives.

    The 2nd volunteer security guard was retired FBI and plugged the perp.

    I suspect a lot of folks in Texas just now found out about the law change…. and future church shootings will be far far fewer… no longer a “disarmed citizens, bad guy free fire zone”.

    The perp had a shotgun. My guess would be a short one, possibly illegally short, to sneak it in. Very hard to defend against a shotgun. You must aim, they just vaguely point…

  93. Larry Ledwick says:

    I’m sure lots of analysis will follow in the next few days. Shooter has been identified, a transient type with lots of criminal encounters with the police including illegal weapons charges.

    The church security team was watching him because of the way he was dressed (all black with hoody and fake beard). The first security guard that got shot was having trouble clearing his pistol it appeared from the video, perhaps he was not processing what he was seeing (this can’t be happening) or carrying in an unfamiliar location – no way to know for sure and not really fair to second guess with the limited information provided at this point. It was so frustrating to watch it happen, and know he was 1 – 1.5 seconds behind events.

    In the concealed carry training classes and online discussions of self defense shootings, you see this event validates the rule of three’s
    Self defense shootings usually happens at under 3 yards, about 3 shots fired and it is over in 3 seconds.

    The whole shooting sequence was 6 seconds long but the revealed gun and actual shots fired were very close to 3 seconds.

    The Head of Church security that took him down made an impressive shot (head shot at about 30 –
    40 ft). He apparently used to run a shooting academy training business.

  94. philjourdan says:

    @Larry Ledwick – Re: Holding over impeachment.

    That would go to SCOTUS since there is no precedent. However, even if that is the case, and that IS Peousi’s plan, there is a fly in the ointment. The case is in the Senate now and it is up to McConnell to decide when to hold the trial. He does not have to wait for the House. And there is no law that says he has to. There is precedent (already violated by Pelousi) and protocol. But no law. I suspect he will give Pelousi about 1 month to get her ducks in a row and then just set the date and execute. That will give the dem senators running for president time to romp around the first 2 primaries/cauci, and then pull the rug out of their campaign as they must sit in judgement on the trial.

    We are in uncharted territory. But none of it is going to go well for the democrats.

  95. E.M.Smith says:

    @PhilJourdan:

    I’m pretty sure McConnell is is just going to wait until THE most painful moment for the Dems running for POTUS and then announce the trial.

    Personally, I’d announce it was started first thing in the morning when most of them were far far away. Let them figure out how to get back and screw them if they are late.

    Then again, I don’t like it when folks screw around with me and “be the mirror” philosophy says they are telling me what THEY want too, so “just doing what you told me to do”…

  96. H.R. says:

    The delay sending the Articles to the Senate is because the real prize is the Mueller Grand Jury material and President Trump’s tax returns. Those two cases are before the Supreme Court.

    The Dems are sure President Trump won’t be convicted by the Senate, so they want that material for the Presidential Election campaign to damage Trump.

    It’s a dicey play by the Dem lawyers. They are going to argue to the Supreme Court that they didn’t have the evidence to impeach President Trump so they need evidence to legitimize the Articles of Impeachment. It’s a circular argument but the real goal was to get dirt for the coming Presidential Campaign.

    The tax info is total overreach and the Mueller investigation is closed, so the Mueller Grand Jury material had no evidence then so how could it be evidence now?

    The current Articles are Constitutionally prohibited Bills of Attainder. You can’t impeach a President and then go looking for a crime, which is what is happening now.

    The Constitution and precedent are pretty clear that none of this should ever have happened. It’s a total Dem/Uniparty coup and power grab. But it’s the D.C. swamp and there’s no telling what anyone in particular will do, legal or not.

    ALL of the Senators except one or two are in on the Ukraine or similar corruption and cannot afford a real trial. They may just put the impeachment to a vote and convict and remove President Trump except Trump does have leverage of his own. So they also may do a quick acquittal. Conundrum there.

    And it’s near certain that the Members of the Supreme Court may have compromising information being held over them which is leveraged in dire times of need (can’t be too obvious about it and use it all the time, eh?).

    That’s the Reader’s Digest reason for the delay in sending over the Articles. We live in interesting times.

  97. p.g.sharrow says:

    Even the Supreme Court is no slam dunk, I wonder how many Justices are compromised by the C.I.A. and the Dark State. I my opinion, Chief Justice Roberts for sure. Senator Schumer said they had or would make up dirt and destroy anyone that got in their way. This game has a lot more play in it.

  98. philjourdan says:

    @HR – I agree it is about dirt on Trump for 2020. But I think the recent court ruling shows they are sunk about getting it (the dismissal of the subpoena). And SCOTUS is not stupid. Partisan yes, but not stupid. What you opined, they know.

    @EM – I agree about it being the most painful. That is why I was thinking a month. Just after the early primaries, but right before Super Tuesday.

  99. E.M.Smith says:

    @H.R.:

    Interesting points. Probably right…

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