Sargon of Akkad Is Ending, Long Live Benjamin Of The Lotus

Sargon of Akkad (aka Carl Benjamin) is dumping all his channels and recandling under a new name / presence.

So far, not so smoothly… He explains it here at bitchute:

For those not wanting to sit through the video, basically he says he’s closing all the Sargon tagged sites / videos / etc/ and going with a new name. Not a surprise as in one of his older videos he says Sargon was a name he used in gaming and never was something he expected to be his “identity” but things just growed… so he’s not really been thrilled with it. OK, so what’s he going to?

In Theory, he’s returned / returning as LotusEaters.com

For those not wishing to read Homer to get the insider joke, the “Island Of The Lotus Eaters” is an island where the food is lotus blossoms and the people are narcotically out of it.

However, for me, at this moment, that link give me an error message:

This page isn’t working http://www.lotuseaters.com redirected you too many times.
Try clearing your cookies.
ERR_TOO_MANY_REDIRECTS

Doing an nslookup tell me it’s a real entry, but with multiple IPs:

ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup lotuseaters.com
Server:		192.168.0.222
Address:	192.168.0.222#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:	lotuseaters.com
Address: 104.28.14.179
Name:	lotuseaters.com
Address: 172.67.150.114
Name:	lotuseaters.com
Address: 104.28.15.179
Name:	lotuseaters.com
Address: 2606:4700:3035::681c:fb3
Name:	lotuseaters.com
Address: 2606:4700:3030::ac43:9672
Name:	lotuseaters.com
Address: 2606:4700:3035::681c:eb3

but doing reverse lookups on those numbers, failed. I include a working example using Apple for what’s supposed to happen:

ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup 104.28.14.179
** server can't find 179.14.28.104.in-addr.arpa: NXDOMAIN

ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup 172.67.150.114
** server can't find 114.150.67.172.in-addr.arpa: NXDOMAIN

ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup 104.28.15.179
** server can't find 179.15.28.104.in-addr.arpa: NXDOMAIN

ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup apple.com
Server:		192.168.0.222
Address:	192.168.0.222#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:	apple.com
Address: 17.253.144.10

ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup 17.253.144.10
10.144.253.17.in-addr.arpa	name = www.icmoud.com.
10.144.253.17.in-addr.arpa	name = apple.com.
10.144.253.17.in-addr.arpa	name = icloud.com.
10.144.253.17.in-addr.arpa	name = icloud.com.cn.
10.144.253.17.in-addr.arpa	name = world-any.aaplimg.com.

So someone doesn’t have their DNS set up right and / or the propagation is set way too slow and it isn’t “out there” yet… (I think just broken DNS config.)

Attempting to connect directly to the number address yields a “go away kid, you bother me”:

 Error 1003 Ray ID: 5f138b14293a1c6d • 2020-11-12 22:03:29 UTC
Direct IP access not allowed
What happened?

You've requested an IP address that is part of the Cloudflare network. A valid Host header must be supplied to reach the desired website.
What can I do?

If you are interested in learning more about Cloudflare, please visit our website.

OK, another Cloudflare screwup, looks like… I’m increasingly un-fond of Cloudflare as they often seem to be the source of DNS scewups I’ve encountered. Maybe they will “fix it” whatever “it” is… someday…

Then, for me, having just completed getting all the Sargon Of Akkad links sorted on the various providers, I need to go back and look for lotuseaters videos. Sigh.

Oh Well.

But now you know. For a little while Sargon of Akkad and Akkad Daily will be up, but any moment they might go “POOF!” and you will have no clue why if you’ve not been following him regularly.

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About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
This entry was posted in Political Current Events, Tech Bits. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Sargon of Akkad Is Ending, Long Live Benjamin Of The Lotus

  1. E.M.Smith says:

    Well, a check of all the streaming sites yields zippo other than at YouTube:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7edjYPNhTm5LYJMT7UMt0Q

    So he has the new Youtube channel up, and it has some content already. Other services not so much. Web site with DNS / Cloudflare issues. Got it…

  2. E.M.Smith says:

    A very nice discussion between Carl and his guest about media bias and its ways…

  3. marcus.z1967 says:

    As Carl explains here… not enough hardware to start out, and too many followers for him.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/PR-vmVvwv6o/

  4. President Elect H.R. says:

    The New York Times disappoints.
    /understatement

  5. V.P. Elect Smith says:

    The NY Times has definitely become a “rag of last resort” DNC whore.

  6. jim2 says:

    The link works for me, but says under construction.

  7. President Elect H.R. says:

    🤣🤣🤣🤣

    V.P. Elect Smith…

    …still chuckling…..

    Take THAT, Heels-up Harris! You ain’t the only one. And Smith is the Neanderthal-American candidate. How’s that for a minority one-up?

    CAVEMEN FOR SMITH! Oogah! Ooogah! Oogah!

  8. President Elect H.R. says:

    BIDEN FOR BASEMENT INSPECTOR-IN-CHIEF!!!

    BIDEN! Basement Inspector-In-Chief ELECT!!

    Because…. every American deserves a FREE waterproof basement!

    Defund the mops!
    .
    .
    Meanwhile, those of you on a slab, well, prepare for a massive tax increase. Somebody has gotta pay for the free stuff.)

  9. Steve C says:

    @Jim2: “Under construction”? – I get “The site is currently down for maintenance”.
    But at least the link goes somewhere.

  10. V.P. Elect Smith says:

    Golly…

    So I try to watch Newsmax via the Odysee link I saved. It fails, but puts up a “helpful” diagnostic showing “me” as green check mark working, and Cloudflare as same, and Odysee.com as host not working…

    I’m left wondering if the real failure is inside Cloudflare again…

    ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup odysee.com
    Server: 192.168.0.222
    Address: 192.168.0.222#53

    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name: odysee.com
    Address: 104.27.141.180
    Name: odysee.com
    Address: 104.27.140.180
    Name: odysee.com
    Address: 172.67.179.72
    Name: odysee.com
    […]
    ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup 104.27.141.180
    ** server can’t find 180.141.27.104.in-addr.arpa: NXDOMAIN

    IMHO: Friends don’t let friends use Cloudflare…

  11. V.P. Elect Smith says:

    And now it is working…

  12. Russ Wood says:

    Oddly enough, my home router (LAN) is 192.168.xxx.xxx. I reprogrammed that from the default because no-one in their right mind is going to hack the SA Airforce’s network (who knows what they might catch? And anyway, I didn’t know it was Apple’s too!). My REAL IP is whatever my ISP allocates when I log on, just like every other home user. With so many thingumabobs on the home wireless LAN, I thought that using the router’s default was a baaaad idea!
    Way back in my dial-up days, my McAfee security was blocking attempts to access some port on my solo machine at a rate of about once every two seconds, so I hereby thank the designers of my firewalls!

  13. V.P. Elect Smith says:

    @Roos Wood:

    One of the “fun little bits” you can do to make it harder to ‘hack your stuff” is to use a real routed IP range on your inside network (and you need your own DNS server to assure your IP Lookups know to stay inside AND you need routing entries to keep them inside), So, for example, say you KNOW you will NEVER EVER hook up to the DNC, you could look up their IP Range:

    ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup dnc.org
    Server:		192.168.12.202
    Address:	192.168.12.202#53
    
    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name:	dnc.org
    Address: 13.35.121.32
    Name:	dnc.org
    Address: 13.35.121.89
    Name:	dnc.org
    Address: 13.35.121.9
    Name:	dnc.org
    Address: 13.35.121.11
    

    Now right off the top, it looks like they have multiple servers on a round robin redirector. You can make a pretty good guess that they have the whole range of 13.35.121.0/24 and just use that for your internal network numbering scheme.

    Now anyone who does see your internal network numbers and tries to get to them, will find themselves off at the DNC as ALL the routers from your boundary router on out to their Telco router will all KNOW that that range goes to the DNC.

    (To do this you either need complete control of your Telco Boundary Router or you need to use a “lab router” between your internal network and your Telco router).

    The only real downside is that if you use a range, then you can NOT ever connect to the actual owner of that range. So, for example, if you used the BofA range, you can’t ever get to the BofA as your router knows that those numbers are all only internal to your network. (There’s a minor downside that you need to know how to configure DNS to over ride the external DNS for your internal use and you need to know how to ‘hard route’ that range to your internal use. Not really very hard, but necessary.)

    There’s also a set of IP numbers that are supposedly NEVER routed over the public networks. Your addresses must translate to a routable number to go anywhere. That’s the 10.x.x.x and 192.168.1.x type.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

    24-bit block	10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255	16777216	10.0.0.0/8 (255.0.0.0)		single class A network
    20-bit block	172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255	1048576	172.16.0.0/12 (255.240.0.0)		16 contiguous class B networks
    16-bit block	192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255	65536	192.168.0.0/16 (255.255.0.0)	256 contiguous class C networks
    

    There’s also an IPv6 block, but I don’t care about them. Hit the link for them.

    So in theory these do not route over the internet. In reality, it is dependent on the configuration in the routers of the internet for that to happen (and, by and large, that’s how all of it IS configured, just know nothing prevents, say, a TLA changing that for a little while… it is just a router config.)

    So I use the non-routing blocks internally. BUT, I’ve seriously considered using a real routing network number and just configuring my router to keep it inside…

    OTOH, since I go through NAT to get to the internet, an outside hacker who tried to hit my machines would still hit a NAT translation, so I’m pretty sure they would face about the same hurdle in any case. BUT, in the unlikely case that NAT were bypassed “somehow”, any attempt to use my actual IP addresses would either “not route” if in the non-routing block, or would “go off to someone else” if I were using a routing address owned by “someone else”.

    Also note than ANY address in the range 192.168.x.x is a non-routing address…

    BTW. folks have sometimes chided me for using 10.x.x.x on some of my internal network as it is a whole class-A and can cover about 15.7 million devices. I do it just because it is unlikely. It also increased the difficulty of picking just what part of it I am actually using. I also have used 172.16-31.{something} for my lab WiFi and 192.168.[somethings} for various other little bits. Again, why? Just because I like it ;-) And it also means you must deal with all of them to get to some parts of my space. That will make it just a little more complex to work out ;-)

    Oh, and also: VERY FEW folks ever use the 172.16-31.x.x block as they tend to stay in the 192.168.x.x block. Using it is easily confused with all the other, legit, 172.x.x.x networks and causes a bit of confusion for some folks (a feature ;-) So numbers like 172.15.x.x or 172.33.x.x are actually routed and assigned to someone. Now, just for grins, you could use a number in those ranges to use a routable range assigned to someone else and yet some folks will think otherwise… or not.

    But be careful, some of them are a bit important:

    ems@OdroidN2:~$ nslookup 172.14.33.22
    22.33.14.172.in-addr.arpa	name = 172-14-33-22.lightspeed.sntcca.sbcglobal.net.
    

    So, yeah, lightspeed via sbcglobal.net… OTOH, if you never use them…

    Now even though the 192.168.x.x range is non-routing and in theory having it “leak” doesn’t matter; I still fudge my numbers in postings. Why give any private side info, eh? Even if it likely isn’t much benefit to an attacker.

  14. V.P. Elect Smith says:

    There’s another interesting point here:

    https://www.lifewire.com/what-is-a-private-ip-address-2625970

    The most famous reserved IP is 127.0.0.1. This address is called the loopback address and is used to test the network adapter or integrated chip. No traffic addressed to 127.0.0.1 is sent over the local network or public internet.

    Technically, the entire range from 127.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 is reserved for loopback purposes but you’ll almost never see anything but 127.0.0.1 used in the real world.

    Addresses in the range from 0.0.0.0 to 0.255.255.255 are also reserved but don’t do anything at all. If you’re even able to assign a device an IP address in this range, it will not function properly no matter where on the network it’s installed.

    So 2 Class A address ranges set aside for No Good Reason.

    In theory, you could get part of each of them to work internally. Either because your equipment already didn’t know that 0.143.285.x was not supposed to be binned, or because you hacked the OS to allow it to work. It would be a Very Neat Hack ;-)

    FWIW, there are some folks who have hacked the IP Stack software in their OS to support other numbering schemes. This kind of stuff is done for Dark Web type work. So you can add an octet (192.168.x.x.x ) or make it a longer number system (1923.1684.xxxx.xxxx) or similar. Yes, that HAS been done!

    Those folks are seriously interested in secure communications as you must hack your OS IO drivers to make it work… (There’s a slightly easier version that just puts those kinds of numbers inside a VPN inside regular traffic, then you can “onion route” those sites inside a regular network VPN wrapper. Then the hardware drivers are not involved, just the ‘inside the VPN” stuff).

    I know, far more than any non-hacker type ever wants to know. But that’s where the real security stuff happens. Beyond the awareness of most others… so they don’t even look at it…

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