Forbes – De-Spun & Edited To Truth

In a comment here:
https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2021/02/28/cpac-triggering-dems-for-sure/#comment-140374
Another Ian (h/t) pointed to an SDA article about more folks watching Trump at CPAC than the Golden Globes (or much of anything else on the ‘news’ really…)

http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/03/01/nothing-seems-to-be-working-6/

Mostly the comments there make it an ‘article’. The whole thing is really just a one liner with a one liner heading:

NOTHING SEEMS TO BE WORKING
March 1, 2021 Kate
31 million viewers for Donald Trump’s CPAC speech. And that was just online.

Not to mention all the folks like me who only watched it a while AFTER that and for that matter on an “off brand” video service (not CPAC nor CSPAN nor YouTube) so highly unlikely that they even saw my contribution to the numbers. Those of us who have as much as possible abandoned the banners are still here, just no longer in their advertising statistics…

In the article, “And that was just online” is a link to a Forbes article:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/petersuciu/2021/03/01/social-media-reactions-to-donald-trumps-cpac-speech/?sh=4df6158e4706

That has “the usual” Left-spin / snark in it. Well, FWIW, I’ve run out of patience for “Cancel Culture” and for the “Lies For Effect” they just love to sprinkle everywhere, AND for the “corruption of the language” they do. I’ve reached the point where such crap, if put “in my face” will be met with a reply of: “Bull Shit. That’s just a load of crap lies and spin. Here’s the truth.” and then some Truth Telling.

So in that spirit, I’m going to De-Spin the Forbes article and Truth-it-up. My additions will be in bold, deletions in strike out and I’ll think of something to do with italics if needed. Maybe I’ll use them for MY Snark. I’m not going to embed nor Truth-up the tweets they embedded, as those as just the usual snarky trash and you can work that out yourself.

Mar 1, 2021,03:12pm EST| 12,330 views
Social Media Snarky Twitter Mobs Of Leftists Reactions To Donald Trump’s CPAC Speech

Peter Suciu Contributor Spin Artist

Social Media
On Sunday night, the 78th Golden Globe Awards honored the best paraded around those who most wanted to show off in American television and film as chosen by they paid or sucked up to the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. However the real show, according to social media, had taken place hours earlier across the country in Orlando, Florida at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). It marked the first time former legitimate President Donald Trump spoke to followers since Usurper President in name only Joe Biden took office in January, and just weeks after Trump was acquitted in his second phony baloney fraud of an impeachment show trial.

Also quite notable was that it was a stark departure from protocol, in which former Republican presidents largely stay silent on matters related to the sitting president allowing former Democratic Presidents, like Obama, to have the stage. Instead Trump offered a strong criticism of Biden and suggested pointed out the fact that U.S. policy had gone from “America first to America last.”

CPAC is the largest meeting of conservative activists party members and politicians in the United States, and it generally serves as a portent to the direction the Republican Party is headed. Based on the reception Trump received at the event, and on social media – it is clear that Trump will remain a dominant force as those folks were crazy in love with him.

Moreover, Trump made it quite clear that he wasn’t interested in forming a new party, but instead would work to unite run RINOs out of town with the help of true Republicans and help absolutely take back control of Congress including the Senate and House of Representatives.

Based on social media the loudest voices on my Twitter Feed it seems clear that Trump’s supporters aren’t looking to move to (sic) past his era give up and play dead like in the past and instead could be are looking forward to the 2024 campaign and blood bath. While former Legitimate President Trump didn’t actually announce that he’ll be running again, his words could be inferred to suggest were pretty much a “Bring It!” that Trump shared with his supporters all of whom are is up for a rematch with Biden – and told his followers he’d be ready to win for “third time” – insisting again that voter fraud was the thing we all saw; with dead people voting, machines diddling votes to Biden, and truck loads of fake ballots being delivered in the dead of night after, BY LAW, vote counting was required to end; and were the method of the Big Steal by played a factor in his loss to Biden in November.

Social Media Support

Since the November election, Twitter and other platforms have largely been filled with garbage tweets and posts calling for Trump’s impeachment, conviction and arrest, while others have been hoping Trump would simply go away, which is what you get when you ban anyone right of Stalin and keep only the Bat Shit Crazy TDS sufferers . However, after the CPAC speech, it seemed that was clear his followers have been energized in ways not even seen during the run up to the election. Man are we screwed ’cause those folks are NOT taking the BS bait that it’s over and Biden “won”. I think maybe the Big Steal of the election really pissed them off.

Actor/comedian Terrence K. Williams (@W_terrence) was among Trump supporters who praised the legitimate former president’s speech.

Reporter Kyle Becker (@kylenabecker) noted the number of viewers who tuned in to watch Trump’s CPAC address.

There were also many who noted that CPAC scored higher ratings than Sunday evening’s preening session and strutting practice Golden Globes ceremony of ego stroking on NBC.

Critics Twitter Trolls, Bots, and TDS Sufferers Will Remain Vocal

There were a fair number of Twitter Trolls, Bots, and TDS Sufferers detractors on social media on Sunday and Monday, as well. Among them was Noah Bookbinder (@NoahBookbinder) (Who?), president of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics some left wing advocacy NGO you never heard of with a Sellers Puff Name, likely funded with dark money most likely sucked out of government indirectly in Washington, who tweeted, “Donald Trump is not only maintaining the lie that he won the 2020 election, but his supporters are using that lie to justify restricting voting and democracy. That makes passing HR1, the For the People Act, which protects voting and democracy, more urgent.” A really crap thing to Tweet,really, as there’s boat loads of actual evidence of The Big Steal and we all know it, we’ve seen the videos and the forensics reports, but hey if we can get the Permanent Steal Forever HR1 crammed through, who cares about honesty or a true vote. Right?

There was also no shortage of memes that poked fun at the former legitimate president, though they were all pretty lame. Why can’t we meme like those guys on the right? while others attempted with our usual GoTo Insult of “RACIST!!!” to compare CPAC to a white nationalist event but that’s really hard with so many Black and Hispanic conservatives now,so it came off really pathetic.

What is clear from the amazing and huge response on Sunday and Monday is that Trump remains largely firmly at the head of the U.S. conservative movement driving a bigger Trump Train than ever, and his supporters continue to stand by him, and they are really pissed and coming back hard. Given this support, it is unlikely that Biden’s calls for unity surrender to the Big Steal Usurper Fraud can come to anything fruition – half the country is standing by the other guy cheering loudly and saying “Hell NO!” to us, while Biden’s own supporters still seem unwilling to show up anywhere or recognize the truth of the situation and never were able to listen to any opinion but the one we fed them compromise with anything the GOP has to say.

The uncivil war we started, fueled, and fostered will likely continue to rage on, especially on social media where the only people left are the idiots we got all riled up and hooked on TDS, having driven all the sane people away.

There, that’s better.

Note: This is for purposes of expressing a political opinion and for the humor content. Don’t take this as an expression of any “facts” about anyone. Especially given the fact free nature of the original opinion piece this is spoofing.

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About E.M.Smith

A technical managerial sort interested in things from Stonehenge to computer science. My present "hot buttons' are the mythology of Climate Change and ancient metrology; but things change...
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41 Responses to Forbes – De-Spun & Edited To Truth

  1. rogercaiazza says:

    Jo Nova pointed this out recently: https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/a-modest-proposal-for-republicans

    I like the idea that the issue is the upper class disdain for everyone not in their clique

  2. Gail Combs says:

    “…I like the idea that the issue is the upper class disdain for everyone not in their clique.”

    Welcome to the club.

    America’s Ruling Class And the perils of revolution by ANGELO CODEVILLA July 16, 2010

    As over-leveraged investment houses began to fail in September 2008, the leaders of the Republican and Democratic parties, of major corporations, and opinion leaders… agreed that spending some $700 billion to buy the investors’ “toxic assets” was the only alternative to the U.S. economy’s “systemic collapse.”

    The public objected immediately, by margins of three or four to one.

    When this majority discovered that virtually no one in a position of power in either party or with a national voice would take their objections seriously, that decisions about their money were being made in bipartisan backroom deals with interested parties, and that the laws on these matters were being voted by people who had not read them, the term “political class” came into use. Then, after those in power changed their plans from buying toxic assets to buying up equity in banks and major industries but refused to explain why, when they reasserted their right to decide ad hoc on these and so many other matters, supposing them to be beyond the general public’s understanding, the American people started referring to those in and around government as the “ruling class.” And in fact Republican and Democratic office holders and their retinues show a similar presumption to dominate and fewer differences in tastes, habits, opinions, and sources of income among one another than between both and the rest of the country. They think, look, and act as a class.

    … Hence whether formally in government, out of it, or halfway, America’s ruling class speaks the language and has the tastes, habits, and tools of bureaucrats. It rules uneasily over the majority of Americans not oriented to government.

    The two classes have less in common culturally, dislike each other more, and embody ways of life more different from one another than did the 19th century’s Northerners and Southerners — nearly all of whom, as Lincoln reminded them, “prayed to the same God.” By contrast, while most Americans pray to the God “who created and doth sustain us,” our ruling class prays to itself as “saviors of the planet” and improvers of humanity. Our classes’ clash is over “whose country” America is, over what way of life will prevail, over who is to defer to whom about what….

    It is a long article but does a great characterizing our ‘Ruling Class’ and WHY the Tea Party formed and why so many are so enthusiastic about President Trump. We FINALLY had a NON-BUREAUCRAT RUN!

  3. philjourdan says:

    Suggested Edit:

    That makes passing HR1, the For the People Act, which protects voting and democracy, more urgent.”

    To:

    That makes passing HR1, the For the People Act, which protects voting and democracy incumbent democrats, more urgent.”

    Then send it (with the strikeouts removed and your bolds inserted) to Forbes.They are weenie dicks so will not print it. But you can post their refusal to be honest.

  4. philjourdan says:

    Sorry, not sure what strikeout is in html. But the portion that is supposed to be struck is”voting and democracy”

    [Reply: Fixed it for you. -E.M.S.]

  5. John Robertson says:

    Whenever you hear a bureaucrat or politician,talking of “Public Interest,Public Service’ or “National interest”,just remember George Carlin.
    Cause the club whose interests they are “protecting” does not include you.
    Or anyone you know.
    In Canada Emperor Justine the Idiot ,keeps lisping on about “Growing the new middle class”.
    Which means ?
    Government Employees.
    The cost of the Parasitic Overload in North America has bankrupted both Countries.
    We have run the “Big is Better” Government Experiment.
    The results/conclusions are impossible to deny.
    Civil society cannot survive being overrun with freeloaders and takers..
    By my calculation no society can afford to have more than 1 person in every 10 engaged in “Helper” status.
    Once you reach current levels of overload the productive,who foot the bill,can no longer be bothered to carry on feeding the useless and clueless who intently seek to sabotage and cripple those who feed them..
    Government controlled by Fools and Bandits is Kleptocracy,which only lasts until the mugs being fooled and robbed wise up.
    The Prison on The Potomac,is quite amusing.
    Funny how little media coverage that eyesore gets.
    Fences and Walls do not work?
    Except in Washington?

  6. E.M.Smith says:

    @Phil:

    I chose deliberately to NOT edit direct quotes of 3rd parties.

    Only critique / parody of the article.

    See: https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/urls-html-unicode-wordpress-antics/

    for guidance on html. The strikeout is done with either the <strike> or the <s> and corresponding </strike> and </s> markers.

  7. Nancy & John Hultquist says:

    Note to Phil – –

    I do two things when trying to find HTML codes.
    1. a regular search on Duck – Duck; or
    2. highlight the thing on another’s comment
    right-click on that, from the drop-down near the bottom,
    click on ‘ inspect ‘
    On the right side, a new window appears with the coding shown.
    In this case it shows the code as ‘s’ for strike through and the ‘/s ‘
    to end. Use regular angle brackets.

  8. Jim Masterson says:

    Amazon Prime was pushing a new show: “Radioactivity.” I thought it was about Madam Curie’s efforts to discover Polonium and Radium. It was somewhat, but then it would jump ahead to different times. One jump was to 1945 and Hiroshima. Have you noticed that the military target aspects of the Hiroshima attack have been removed? Japan’s 2nd Army headquarters in Hiroshima was essentially the Japanese Pentagon. It’s a violation of Geneva Convention to allow non-combatants around a military target as an attempt to prevent attacks.

    Jim

  9. philjourdan says:

    @N&J Hulquist (and EMS) – Advice taken. Although in my pathetic defense, I thought I remembered it. Alas, no trades back on posts.

    @EMS – Re: Direct quotes – then perhaps an ellipse would suffice to drive home the point?

  10. philjourdan says:

    @Jim Masterson – It does not really matter what was the “main target” of Hiroshima, the fact remains it was part of the military machine of the Japanese empire. Too much has been put on the 2 Atom Bombs. They were both justified and neither caused as many deaths as the bombing that was purely for show – to show the Russians the Allied power.

    That would be Dresden. Which served no military purpose other than a demonstration to the advancing Russians of what the British and Americans could do. The city was filled with thousands of refugees fleeing the advancing Soviet army. The firebombing took over 130k lives.

    Just to demonstrate – not to the enemy, but to a supposed ally, what we were capable of.

    Do not expect the ignorant woke to know about that.

  11. E.M.Smith says:

    More were killed in the firebombing of Tokyo than in either nuclear blast.

    My Wife’s Father is alive thanks to those bombs as he had received orders to prep for deployment for the Japan Invasion (Airborn…). Which means my wife exists. Which means my family exists.

    I’m 100% in favor or the rapid ending of the war via nuclear bombs instead of the 1/4 to 1/2 MILLION who would die in an invasion and saturation firebombing…

  12. The True Nolan says:

    @philjourdan “Do not expect the ignorant woke to know about that.”

    Nor do they know that Japan had not one but two programs attempting to develop their own nuclear weapons for use against the US. There are rumors (unconfirmed in my opinion) that Japan had even succeeded in testing a bomb (IIRC on a small island off the coast of Korea) just before the US forced their surrender. It has been a decade or two since I did any reading on it, but one of the programs was at the University of Tokyo. When Japan surrendered they quickly bulldozed their nuclear research equipment into Tokyo Bay before the Allies came ashore. “What? Nuclear research? Not us!”

  13. E.M.Smith says:

    @TTN:

    I’ve seen an interview with a Japanese Researcher from that program who stated it was true. Also had documents he’d saved, shown in the video, with some details. The N. Korean nuclear program likely was boosted by the fact that the Japanese test device was set off in what is now N. Korea about a week before we dropped ours.

    There’s lots of evidence that it was real, and they had a device that went BOOM.

    It also explains why they didn’t immediately surrender after the first one. The idea that we “only had one” was bolstered by their experience of how hard it was to build and their limited inventory. When the 2nd one went off, that turned to “What will 3 or 4 or.. do to Japan?” along with us saying “Tokyo is next, Dear Emperor” or something similar.

    Unlike spousal Dad, my Dad did not have “orders in hand” to ship out to the Pacific / Japan. However, he was told to plan on Pacific next. (Combat Engineers, so told to start planning needs for invasion supplies once landed. What trucks and equipment to load up from Europe, etc.)

    So yeah, I’m 100% happy with Japan deciding to end their war rather than having my Dad arrive on a beach somewhere just in time for their 2nd device to be tested…

  14. jim2 says:

    Has anyone been watching “The Pacific?” It’s awesome. John Basilone was a key element in holding off (killing) 3,000 Japanese soldiers who were nothing but relentless. Just a river of them getting mowed down by his two machine guns. His story was featured, but that’s not all to it.

    We (Allies) probably would have lost hundreds of thousands more men trying to dislodge the Japanese from their lairs. I’m grateful for the nuclear bombs dropped.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Basilone

  15. another ian says:

    There is a fair bit around invasion vs A bomb in

    James D. Hornfischer “America at total war in the Pacific 1944 – 1945: the fleet at flood tide”

    Including estimated casualties. Invasion wasn’t going to be trivial in allied troop losses. Nor were estimates of Japanese losses (military and civil) after the civilian experience of Saipan

  16. The True Nolan says:

    @E.M. ” my Dad (snip) was told to plan on Pacific next.”

    My uncle was already deployed to the Pacific and his group was readying for invasion. He told me that he did not expect to survive and was ecstatic when Japan surrendered. My guess? Invasion would have led to a million US casualties and 100,000 US deaths. The Japanese count (considering that the bulk of resistance would be civilian elderly, women, children) might have been five or ten times that. War is sometimes necessary, but never glorious; an invasion of Japan would have set new standards for horror, Stalingrad times a hundred.

  17. cdquarles says:

    One has to wonder what’s being taught these days. I don’t envy that generation’s considerations during war time. I am a military brat in a multi-generation military family. Army, Navy, Merchant Marine and Air Force. What I can say is that my generation, at least in my family, was told that all of the players in WW2 were working on nukes. We were fortunate that we got them and used them first. Yes, we were told that using them limited the number of casualties suffered on both sides, compared to the fire bombing of Japan and Germany or the invasions of them, given what had happened invading Germany had seen and was was being seen dislodging the Japanese from the Philippines and elsewhere.

  18. E.M.Smith says:

    @CDQuarles:

    Toward the end in Europe, Germany loaded up their Nuclear Program and what special materials they could into a submarine that they sent off to Japan. The Germans were a few months from a working nuclear device and would have had one first but for three things:
    1) Germany sent their best Jewish Physicists to America.
    2) The Norwegian heavy water plant was destroyed.
    3) Hitler didn’t think the program mattered that much so didn’t rebuild the heavy water facility, crippling their ability to make Special Nuclear Material.

    Had Hitler been just a little less harsh and egotistical, he could have fairly easily taken Europe, held it, and then had nukes in hand before proceeding to take Russia and the UK. Had Japan not bombed Pearl Harbor, and again played it just a little slower, they could have taken most of Micronesia and maybe even a bit more, then show the US Fleet what happens when a nuke is set off in an air burst overhead.

    We’re talking about 6 months delay, that’s all it would have taken to have both Germany and Japan armed with nuclear bombs. Then it would have been impossible for the Invasion of Normandy to happen (one bomb ends it all…) or to have stopped the Japanese from taking everything down to Australia; as we could never have a massed fleet in the Pacific.

    Had there been no purge of the Jews, and had there been a “kinder gentler” approach to absorbing the countries of Europe and the Pacific Islands, the Manhattan Project would have started later, probably too late, and likely with far less funding / effort. Kind of like the way China is slowly absorbing countries around the globe via Debt Traps and Purchase of Politicians… and nobody cares enough to take them seriously…

    We were both lucky and smart in W.W.II but now it looks like we are neither.

  19. philjourdan says:

    @TTN – Re: Japan and the Bomb – We use to have a regular poster that swore that was true and that is where the NK Nuclear program came from. OManuel I think?

    But the real truth is they were getting their data and supplies from Germany (which came damn close to getting their own – with rockets to boot). Japan had to import heavy water from Germany via subs. So no, I do not believe Japan was even on the door step. Germany sure was!

  20. philjourdan says:

    @EMS – Japan’s test device.

    I do not think so. But I do not know. However, after we dropped Fat Man and Little Boy, the Japanese general staff was arguing against surrender as they noticed the bombs exploded above ground, so they could hide underground. If they had any conception of nuclear weapons, they would not have been taking that tact. But that is just my opinion.

    But like you, and most Japanese (just not the woke idiots), all feel that they saved lives. The carnage on Okinawa (and the deaths among the Japanese outpaced allied deaths 10-1) showed that an assault on the Japanese main islands would have been very bloody and very costly to both sides.

  21. philjourdan says:

    @EMS – “We were both lucky and smart in W.W.II but now it looks like we are neither.”

    No, now it looks like we were both. We got Einstein. We got Oppenheimer. That was lucky. They made us smart.

  22. philjourdan says:

    @EMS – unless you meant the last clause to be present tense? IN which case you are correct,. Second reading is second sight.

  23. E.M.Smith says:

    “are” is present tense. We were smart. Now we are not being smart.

  24. E.M.Smith says:

    Found the early reference to a Japan program, documenting it here so I know where to find it again:
    http://www.reformation.org/atlanta-constitution.html

    Then there was the History Channel film that I saw. Not found a copy yet, but New Republic talked about it and folks commented here:
    https://freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1464754/posts
    Looks like a 2005 debut…

    Looking for the title on history.com and imdb didn’t find it, so maybe been black holed?

  25. E.M.Smith says:

    This looks like the source book for the History Channel show:
    http://www.robertkwilcox.com/japans-secret-war-blockbuster.html

    Has an interesting clue. Why keep it secret? I’ve pondered a back door to Special Nuclear Materials for about 35 years. Now I can talk about it since India did it. Chemical separation of U233 from a Thorium reactor. Got to keep up the story that only massive centrifuge farms can make SNM…

    Japan’s Secret War by Robert K. Wilcox
    By: Stephen Bryen

    December 27, 2019 – Robert Wilcox’s Third Edition of Japan’s Secret War has just been released and it is a blockbuster. The new edition explains how Japan’s World War II effort to build an atomic bomb formed the foundation for today’s North Korean nuclear program. Wilcox might have added that Japan was also a vital resource for the Soviet Union who took control over Korea down to the 38th parallel in 1945.

    The Russians knew exactly what they were looking for, and they got it. Korea, until the end of the war annexed by Japan since 1910 (a deal blessed by President Theodore Roosevelt) was the most important part of Japan’s atomic bomb program. The allies, especially the United States, did not know that. The Russians did.

    While it can’t be proven today, I believe that the Russian spy in Tokyo, Richard Sorge, hanged by the Japanese in November 1944, provided vital information on Japan’s atomic bomb program to his NKVD bosses. No doubt it was his information that gave Lavrentiy Beria, the NKVD head, the scientific information he needed to pursue the bomb, and Stalin put him in charge of the project (showing clearly that the Soviets depended on the flow of intelligence for their A-bomb effort). Stalin also took advantage of Truman’s invitation to intervene in Mongolia and Korea almost at the end of the war. As Wilcox points out, the toughest fighting was when the Russians took control of the Konan (Hungnam) area where Japan’s nuclear work was centered in Korea.

    Japan had (at least) two major atomic bomb programs, one run by the Japanese army and headed by Yoshio Nishina of Japan’s Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) and the other run by Bonsaku Arakatsu who ran the navy’s F-Go atomic bomb project. Both men were top physicists, and Nishina had strong connections to Albert Einstein, Ernest Lawrence at the University of California and Niels Bohr (whom Nishina again visited after the end of World War II).

    It was the navy project that used Korea for uranium enrichment and thorium processing. North Korea is rich in monazite, an excellent source for thorium. Thorium in a nuclear reactor can be changed to the element protactinium and then through chemical processing to uranium (U-233). (This appears to be what the Germans were doing, too. As Paul Frame points out, Auer Gesselshaft, “a German chemical company involved in securing and processing uranium,” had taken over the French thorium company Terres-Rares during the Nazi occupation.”

    The US only learned about the Korean thorium in 1946, and by that time Konan was under Russian control. But there were strong enough indications about the Konan area for the US Air Force to send a camera-equipped B-29 named Hog Wild to fly over Konan on August 29, 1945 – 14 days after Japan surrendered. Russian Yak fighters shot it down and it crash-landed.

    In 1950 at the time of the Korea War, the US Air Force bombed Konan and destroyed the thorium processing facilities there.

    As Wilcox explains, much of the most critical bomb-making in Korea was done in caves, just as North Korea is doing today (perhaps using some of the same caves). The US had no ability to destroy the caves, and in the fighting during the Korean War, some of the toughest battles took place around the Chosin Reservoir. There UN forces were thrown back and defeated and were finally rescued at the port of Konan (Hungnam) between December 15 and 24, 1950.

    Much of the evidence about Japan’s atomic bomb program is still classified, and those Japanese scientists and military men Wilcox interviewed were far from candid in their accounts of Japan’s atomic bomb program.

    If the US ever declassifies critical documents, the history of atomic bomb development, the looming crisis that was headed off by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, will finally be revealed.

    Wilcox’s new third edition should be required reading for policymakers today.

    Robert K. Wilcox: Japan’s Secret War: Third edition Revised and Updated (New York: Permuted Press, 2019)

    So IFF the Japanese found and used the chemical pathway through Thorium to a U-233 bomb, that information would be suppressed even today (Iran and centrifuges….).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pokhran-II

    Shakti V – A 0.2 kt Thorium/U-233 experimental device.

    In any discussion of a Th / U-233 based SNM Bomb cycle, folks come out of nowhere to say how impossible it is to get the U-232 low enough. Yet India tested one…. Which leads me to believe it is a deliberate FUD effort. Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt.

    So if Japan had done it too, that would of necessity require suppression.

  26. cdquarles says:

    Were I doing it, I’d be thinking about both processes. I won’t say more, having done ultracentrifugation on a small scale.

  27. The True Nolan says:

    And just for general information I would point out that deuterium oxide freezes at a slightly different temperature that regular hydrogen oxide. A similar process takes place for various isotopes crystalizing out of a saturated solution.

  28. cdquarles says:

    And gases … thermodynamic temperature is a kind of average, a weighted mean representative of the internal kinetic energy of a sample of matter. Hot gas moves faster. Lower mass gas constituents move faster, so you can use that principle to separate compounds containing different mass isotopes; but there are still limits. Example: 2DO16 has the same molecular weight as 2HO18. There are ways around that, too. Consider gas chromatography plus mass spectroscopy.

  29. DonM says:

    “… but that’s really hard with so many Black and Hispanic conservatives now.”

    You still don’t get it … they ain’t black unless they voted for biden.

    There were no blacks at CPAC.

  30. jim2 says:

    DonM says: 5 March 2021 at 8:28 pm

    Soooo … Black is the new White???

  31. philjourdan says:

    Still maintain that the Japanese “nuclear” program was just the German one. They were close. The Japanese had no clue (we can hide underground!). With the Nazi material and a couple of years, perhaps. But I am not an Omanuel (god rest his soul) believer.

  32. Jim Masterson says:

    @cdquarles

    “. . . thermodynamic temperature is a kind of average . . . .”

    I wish you wouldn’t use “thermodynamic temperature” and “average” in the same sentence. Thermodynamic temperature is an intensive property (our host uses intrinsic) in Thermodynamics–not an average. Temperature defined in kinetic theory of gases is a kind of average.

    Does Latex work on this site? Test:

    \displaystyle \sum\limits_{i=1}^{n}{i=\frac{n\cdot (n+1)}{2}}

    Jim

  33. cdquarles says:

    @Jim,
    A distinction without a difference, in my opinion. What is a defined sample of matter? Well, one mole of a pure one is 6.02 x 10^23 of particles of them. We can’t track that many individual atoms or molecules, whether solid, liquid, gas, or plasma. So yes, we can call that an intensive property of said sample. That still doesn’t mean that, under the hood, said intensive property isn’t a weighted mean of each atom or molecule’s kinetic energy, since each will vary from others and over time. Nor does what the thermometer measure happen to be anything other than one or more proxies for said internal kinetic energy; again, in my opinion, so I will say it as that is what I think.

    Come to think of it, atomic force microscopy comes closest to tracking individual atoms and can demonstrate the jiggling, sort of. X-ray crystallography can, too, to an extent.

    Latex test passed.

  34. E.M.Smith says:

    Intensive and intrinsic mean the same thing in this context and I use them interchangeably.

    It isn’t making a distinction between atoms of a “thing”, it is making the point that the number of them and their mass / specific heat matter.

    You must know the mass and specific heat for the temperature to say anything about the energy content of the substance. So count up your atoms and find the specific heat for that collection of them, then you can say temperature means anything about heat content. As for plain temperature: Yes, it’s just a proxy for average KE of the atoms of a sample as measured by some other sample doing something we can observe. But without knowing the Specific Heat and size of the sample you can’t say how large the total KE is of the atoms involved…

  35. Jim Masterson says:

    @cdquarles

    “A distinction without a difference, in my opinion.”

    Yes, you are 100% correct. It’s just that I tend to eschew any attempt to average temperatures–especially thermodynamic temperatures. First they average daily temperatures to get a monthly average. Those temperatures have a maximum precision of 1 degree, yet they generate a precision of a tenth of a degree. Then they average the monthly temperatures to get a yearly average and increase the precision to a hundredth of a degree. They violate the scientific rules of precision and the mathematical rules of averaging.

    Any temperature obtained from a thermometer is an intensive property. Averaging intensive properties is simple nonsense–IMO.

    Jim

  36. E.M.Smith says:

    @Jim:

    No “IMO” needed. Averaging of intensive / intrinsic properties is nonsense By Definition.

    The classic example is that a phone number is intrinsic to one person. What is the meaning of the average phone number for New York? NONE!

  37. cdquarles says:

    @Jim and our most gracious host,
    Yes, I agree there. I’ve made that point elsewhere; though the analogy I use is averaging numeric labels on lottery balls.

  38. H.R. says:

    @cdquarles – What?!? You mean I can’t win the lottery if I average all the numbers and then play the average?

    😜… 😁… 😎

    Wait up… If you average the labels on the lottery balls, eventually……

    …no… 26 – 26 – 26 – 26 – 26 – 26 is not possible. You’re right. It’s meaningless. 😜

    But rest assured, some jurinalist (Swedish pronunciation) is dumb enough to try it. Now I’d bet money on that.

  39. philjourdan says:

    @H.R. – averaging the numbers is white supremacy! That is the construct of the European slavers using Math created by Arabic scholars and Asian Scholars to to enslave Arabic and Asians.

  40. E.M.Smith says:

    Maybe we can get Climate Change Paranoia labeled as “racist”. It’s plot by White Northern Europeans to stop Europe from warming up and being more conducive to Dark Skinned people… Yeah, that’s the ticket… What’s wrong with those European Racists wanting to keep Europe cold and all to themselves!

    /sarc;

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